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THE MISSION HERALD 



FORWARD MOVEMENT PLANS 
ARE UNDER WAY 



General Convention Commission Meets in Chicago 
and Formulates and Launches Program 



CHICAGO — Plans for a Forward Movement of 
sweeping proportions, aimed to revitalize and 
invigorate the Church's mission throughout the 
world, were put in motion at a meeting here of the 
Joint Commission appointed by the recent General 
Convention. The commission, headed by Bishop 
Hobson of Southern Ohio, was in session two days 
and during that time launched what was termed one 
of the greatest and most important movements which 
the Church has experienced in recent years. 

The movement is to be based first of all upon th-3 
spiritual life of the Church and will aim to revive 
and revitalize such in every branch of the Church. 
Secondly, it wd'1 be concerned with the financial 
welfare of the Church looking toward a soundo- 
financial structure, in the parishes, in the dioceses, 
and in the National Church. 

Statement to Church 

"The Church at large must realize that to re- 
invigorate the life and to rehabilitate the work of 
each unit, we must use every existing force and the 
allegiance of every Church member in united and 
statement addressed to the entire Church. "So 
great is this task that there can be no point in sight 
at which the end may be said to have been attained. 
Admittedly, therefore, the program must proceed 
from stage to stage in progressive development." 

The first step in its effort, the commission believes, 
is to drive home to the consciousness of the whole 
Church an awareness of the present critical need 
and the unprecedented opportunity at hand. 

"The need ranges from a world situation down 
to the state of individuals," continues the commis- 
sion statement. "We dare not choose a more limited 
range by declaring that certain areas do not concern 
us. 

"Opportunity beckons us as never before in our 
centuiy. Widespread distress and bewilderment 
are making men more ready to consider the Gospel 
as an answer to their problems. In spite of all our 
difficulties, now is come a time when we lift up our 
hearts, thank God. and take courage. God has not 
deserted His people and His world. The blows of 
misfortune serve but to strengthen our assurance 
in Him." 

Discipleship Urged 

That each Church member live up to his full re- 
sponsibilities as a Christian disciple is the first in- 
junction of the commission. Such duties it sets forth 
as: sincere repentance, obedient following, growing 



knowledge and understanding, the habit of prayer 
and meditation, every member at his task, unfailing 
attendance at worship, and outpouring of money and 
life. 

The commission points out clearly that in its re- 
habilitation -job, it does not propose setting up any 
new organization for promoting its work. "Our 
purpose is to work with and through all existing 
departments and organizations which lead the 
Church to take up its whole adventure," it says. 
It continues : 

"The Forward Movement plan must transform 
every area of our common life, quicken every mem- 
ber, sustain the Christian home, attend to youth's 
appeal, set up standards in the parish and press to 
their attainment, promote community welfare, arid 
integrate the diocese. The plan must recognize and 
strive to satisfy the demand for social adjustments 
and the appeal of questions between nations." 
Large Fund Designated 

The movement is significant in view of the fact 
that the commission was created by joint resolution 
of General Convention and that General Convention 
allotted to the commission one-half of the income 
from undesignated legacies for the coming triennium. 
This sum is estimated to be nearly $100,000 a year. 

During the next three months, the commission will 
establish contacts with every bishop of the Church 
in order to evaluate the needs of each diocese and 
missionary district. A second meeting of the group 
to consider findings and work out more definite 
plans will be held in Cincinnati February 27th and 
28th. 

"The Church at large is trusted to understand 
that the commission recognizes no complete program 
or detailed form of procedure can or should be 
developed in a few days or a few weeks," said 
Bishop Hobson, commenting on the whole plan at 
the conclusion of the meeting. "The commission 
accepted its call to lead in the Forward Movement 
and not to impose it upon the Church. Its intention 
is to inspire in the Church's constituent units such 
confidence as will grant a true picture of the varied 
conditions each unit faces. It will seek to discover 
the Church's own spirit and will and to work through 
the Church's own forces as all together go forward. 
No Special Campaign 

"The commission is unanimous in the conviction 
that the Forward Movement must, not be a special 
campaign to meet an emergency, or to raise mouey. 
even though in a certain sense it was bom out of an 
emergency. The program is to be one of education 
and spiritual revival to continue indefinitely. 

"S ; nce the movement was decided upon many in 
the Church have interceded for it in their prayers. 
(Continued on Page 15) 



The Mission Herald 



VOLUME XLIX 



WILMINGTON, N. C, JANUARY, 1935 



NUMBER 1 



BISHOP'S LETTER 



I "thank God and take courage" as I enter upon 
another year of joyful service as Bishop of our be- 
loved diocese, and to you, my loyal friends and co- 
laborers, I extend my loving greetings and sincere 
good wishes for the coming year. 

Having celebrated the twentieth anniversary of 
my consecration as Bishop in an inspiring service in 
St. James' Church, Wilmington, on January 6th, I 
might well nmke this letter a review of those blessed 
years in which I have had the high privilege of serv- 
ing Christ and His Church in this corner of the Vine- 
yard, but I will refrain from doing so at this time 
in the hope that I may have the pleasure of telling 
you the story when we meet in Annual Convention 
in St. Paul's, Beaufort on May 15th. 

I must express my appreciation, however, for the 
many messages that have come to me from friends 
within and without the diocese and assure them of 
my hearty thanks for their gracious, helpful remem- 
brance of the day. 

As I enter upon my twenty-first year as your 
Bishop and servant, I call you, my people, to renewed 
dedication to the cause of Christ and His Church 
and to renewed allegiance to Him, without whom 
our labor is biit in vain. 

A great task has been committed to our hands. 
To us has been given a great responsibility. We 
must face the task with faith and courage. We 
must accept the responsibility as a real part >of our 
heritage as sons and daughters of God. 

The burden of debt incurred through the failure 
or inability of many of our people to meet their 
promises during the past few years must be lifted, 
for a debt burdened diocese is a crippled diocese. 

Our vacant fields must be filled in order that the 
little, necessarily neglected congregations here and 
there throughout the diocese may have the leader- 
ship for which they have patiently waited. 

We must make it possible for our beloved Church 
to go into new territory and win and hold for God 
fresh fields of opportunity and service. 
\Q We must catch up with our own ideals and do our 



full joyful part in extending the kingdom of the 
conquering Christ into all the world. 

In the words of King David, on a memorable 
occasion in the history of Israel, "who then is willing 
to dedicate himself this day unto the Lord"? 

God give us the strength to hear, heed and obey 
that call. 

Faithfully and affectionately, 

Your friend and Bishop, 

THOMAS C. DARST. 



A BISHOP HAS AN ANNIVERSARY 



Yesterday marked the twentieth anniversary of 
the consecration of the Right Reverend Thomas C. 
Darst as Bishop of East Carolina, an event celebrated 
by a special sermon by the prelate at Saint James' 
Church. 

The Star-News, often critical, sometimes cynical 
and occasionally accused of radical views, takes this 
occasion to felicitate the Bishop and to add its own 
humble appraisal of his two decades' work in the 
vineyard of the Lord, with particular emphasis on 
that part of his anniversary sermon which declared 
that his prayer at consecration was to be kept "sim- 
ple", in order that he might persuade and lead his; 
flock rather than drive it. 

We admire that expression, particularly when com- 
ing from a high ranking churchman, for it is our 
belief that such sentiment is indeed the fundamental 
of religion. Bishop Darst is outstanding as a leader 
of the Church, and one who is perhaps more loved 
than any clergyman in North Carolina. The reason 
is not hard to find. There is nothing of the driver 
or the potentate about him. In his ecclesiastical 
robes he is human and understanding. Without 
them he is a man of such lovable character as to 
command and hold the respect of all who come in 
his contact, and as such he does more to spread re- 
ligion than scores of lesser lights who may dwell for 
hours on the threatened end to a sinful life. 

So, on this occasion, Bishop, we congratulate you 
and commend you as a gentleman who almost per- 
fectly typifies what we consider an exemplification 
of a Christ-like life, and we wish for you many years 
more in the active service of a cause to which you 
have contributed so materially. 

— Wilmington Star-News 



THE MISSION HERALD 



BISHOP DARST REVIEWS TWENTY YEARS 
AS A BISHOP 



Speaks Sunday Morning At St. James ' Church After 
Two Decades in the Episcopacy 



Two decades of progress of the diocese of East 
Carolina were briefly reviewed by the Right Rever- 
end Thomas iC. Darst at the morning service at St. 
James' Episcopal Church yesterday morning as he 
celebrated the twentieth anniversary of his consecra- 
tion as bishop of the diocese. 

Using as his theme, "1 thank God and take courage 
to go forward," Bishop Darst pointed with pride to 
the record of the diocese and the support given him 
by its members, whom he added "have given the 
bishop that strength to go forward." 

Pays Tribute to the Rev. W. H. Milton 

Bishop Darst, who was consecrated in St. James' 
Church, Jannarfy 6, 1915, took occasion to pay tri- 
bute to Dr. W. H. Milton, rector of St. James', to 
whom he said a "large part of the splendid leader- 
ship of the diocese is due". He also paid tribute 
to the late Robert Strange, his immediate predeces- 
sor, and to Bishop Watson, who preceded Bishop 
Strange. 

"During the twenty year's of my ministry I have 
found it in my heart to thank (iod and take courage 
to go forward," said the Bishop. "Since 1915 the 
world has been tremendously changed. There have 
been new experiments in government and many 
other things, and yet through it all Clod has been 
the same and the memory of his Son has the same 
power." 

Brought 7,262 Into the Church 

He recalled that since his consecration he has tried 
to be simple and to be a friend to all. pointing out 
that he has brought 7.262 persons into the Church. 
and adding that it has given him "tremendous joy" 
because he has been "the connecting link between 
the Holy Chost and the seeking child." 

He also pointed out that he has ordained forty-two 
deacons and forty-two priests. Twenty-six new 
churches and parish houses have been built in the 
diocese in the last twenty years and included in these 
are twelve places in which there Avas no church be- 
fore, he said. There are more than seven thousand 
communicants in the diocese at the present time, 
whereas there were onlv something over five thou- 
sand then: last year the diocese contributed $112 000 
to all purposes against $70,000 in 1915. 

Good Record on Missions 
"During that time we have not for one moment 
taken counsel of our fears or decided to retreat," 



he said, adding significantly that the motto has been, 
"Ever onward, ever irpward." "We have sent our 
children to foreign countries so that today the dio- 
cese of East Carolina girdles the globe." 

"The diocese has a splendid record in missionary 
giving and leadership. 1 face a new day and its 
problems with hope. 1 do thank God and take 
courage for I know we will win through. 

"We cannot discuss material prosperity or carry 
out material plans unless back of it all are people 
consecrated to the task. My hope is that there may 
be more generous support of the cause for which 
Christ died. During my travels over the diocese 
daily I pass places that are crying out for leadership. 
My hope, please Cod, will become a reality some 
day." 

On National Committee 

Bishop Darst was born in Pulaski, Va. November 
10, 1S75. He attended Roanoke College at Salem, 
Va., and graduated from theological seminary in 
Virginia in 1902. He became a deacon the same 
year and was ordained priest in 1903 and served as 
assistant rector at Fairmont, W. Va. He served as 
rector of Meade and John's parishes from 1903 until 
1905; St. Mark's Church in Richmond. Va., from 
1905 until 1909; St. Paul's Church, Newport News, 
Va., from 1910 until 1914; St. James' Church m 
Richmond, from 1914 until 1915. when he was con- 
secrated bishop. He is a trustee of the Bishop Payne 
Divinity School in Petersburg, Va., trustee of the 
University of the South, Sewance. Tenn., and trustee 
of St. Mary's and St. Augustine Schools, Raleigh. 

For ten years he has been a member of the national 
committee on evangelism of which he is now chair- 
man and from 1916 to 1927 was director of the 
Bishop's Crusade. — Wilmington Star-News 



PRESIDING BISHOP CONGRATULATES BISHOP 
DARST ON TWENTIETH ANNIVERSARY 



Providence, R. I. 
January 3, 1935. 
My dear Bishop Darst: 

I am writing to join with your people and with 
the whole Church in thanksgivings for the twenty 
years of loving and fruitful service that you have 
given in the Eniscopate. Your Consecration on the 
Feast of the Epiphany will be remembered, I am 
sure, by many next Sunday morning as it will by me. 
May this next year, and the next score of years 
in your ministry be filled with Cod's continued 
blessing — and be crowned with the joy known only 
to him who serves. 

Affectionately yours 

JAMES DeWOLF PERRY 



JANUARY, 1935 

ANNUAL MEETING OF WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 

WILL BE HELD IN CHRIST CHURCH 

ELIZABETH CITY, JANUARY 23, 24, 1935 

If We Be His Disciples 
"Close to Christ And Forward With Him" 

PROGRAM 

January 23, 1935 
10:00 A. M.— -Celebration of the Holy Communion. 

Address Bishop Darst 

11:30 A. M. — Opening Session, 

CHRISTIAN CITIZENSHIP 
Greetings from Parish 
Response. 
Minutes. 

Appointment of Committees, f 
12 :00 Noon — Noonday Prayers. 

President's Report 

Mrs. Fred L. Outland 

Secretary's Report 

Mrs. J. L, Shackleford 

Treasurer's Report 

Mrs. John A. Guion 

Provincial Outlook 

Mrs. Henry J. MacMillan 
Christian Social Service Depart- 
ment Mrs. John Ei. F. Hicks 

Lake Phelps Mission 

Miss Lona Belle Weatherly 
1 :00 P. M.— Lunch 

2 :00 P. M.— DEVELOPMENT OF THE LIFE OF 
THE SPIRIT. 
Hymn 260: "O for a heart to praise 

my God" 
Prayers 
Roll Call 

Convocation of Edenton 

Mrs. W. S. Carawan 

Convocation of Wilmington 

.Mrs. J. Q. Beckwith 

Colored Convocation 

Mrs. R. T. Johnson 

TRIENNIAL MEETING (Five minute 

reports from Delegates and Visitors) 

Missions Mrs. J. Q. Beckwith 

Christian Citizenship 

Mrs. W. S. Carawan 
Development of the Life of the 

Spirit Miss Caroline K. Myers 

Resolutions — New Business — 

Mrs. S. P. Adams 

Young People 

. Mrs. W. N. Tillinghast 



3 :30 P. M.— Rev. Daniel A. McGregor, Ph. D. 

Educational Department 

Mrs. A. B. Houtz 

Thompson Orphanage 

Rev. W. H. Wheeler 

|. Supply Department 

. Mrs. P. T. Anthony 

Church Periodical Club 

Miss Jessie Peace 

8:00 P. M.- Mass Meeting 

Rev. Daniel A. McGregor, Ph. D. 
Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst, D. D. 
January 24, 1935 
7 :30 A. M.— Corporate Communion. 

Celebrant Bishop Darst 

Presentation of Bishop's Fund. 
9:00 A. M. — Conferences. 
9 :30 A. M.— MISSIONS IN THIS AGE 

Hymn 430 "Jesus shall reign " 

Prayers 

Minutes 

Field Department 

Mrs John B. Cranmer 

Publicity Department 

Mrs Henry J. MacMillan 

Y. P. S. L. and Camp Leach 

' r ~ y: '' "*■ __Bi'lly Daniels 

Report of Nominating Committee 
Elections 

12:00 Noon— Noonday Prayers Bishop Darst 

JAPAN Miss Clara Neely 

United Thank Offering 

Miss Caroline K. Myers 
Advance Work 
1:00 P. M.— Lunch 

2:00 P. M.— Hymn 502 "Lord speak to me" 
Prayers. 

Reports of Committees 
Announcement of Department Chair- 
men. 
Installation of Officers _ Bishop Darst 
■' . ; Hymn 236 "O Love that wilt" 

Minutes 
Adjournment 
Benediction. 
There will be an Executive Board Meeting, Tues- 
day evening at 8 o'clock. 



ST. JOHN'S, PITT COUNTY 



At St. John's Church below Grifton the Woman's 
Auxiliary by work and soliciting aid from members 
and friends of the parish has raised the money to 
buy a new chancel carpet. The carpet has been 
placed in position and is very beautiful. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



GALILEE MISSION, LAKE PHELPS 



On Friday evening, January 4th we had our annual 
'Christmas program and tree at the "Lake". 

For about one month before the "great event" 
took place we met twice a week at the Mission Chape", 
for practice. Through snow, rain, and cold the peo- 
ple were very faithful in attending practice. Never 
did we have more than three absent for practice, out 
of a group of over fifty people, despite the fact that 
not a single one of them rode and many of them 
came at least three miles. 

On Thursday and Friday several of the older peo- 
ple and a few of the children helped us decorate the 
chapel. The ehapel was transformed into a cathe- 
dral by the generous use of evergreens combined 
with the artistic eye of Miss Lona Belle Weatherly, 
who teaches at the mission. The tree was one of the 
most beautifully decorated that I ever saw. 

The doors were opened at six-thirty and soon the 
house was full of people eager for the program to 
begin. At 7:15 the program began. 

The program consisting of four parts was directed 
by Miss Weatherly assisted by me. 

The program was as follows: 

1. An opening chorus — "Merry Christmas to You" 
in which the choir and those participating in the 
program took part. 

2. A tableau — "The Nativity", in which ten people 
and a choir of twelve voices took part. The tableau 
began with "Zacharias in the Temple" and ended 
with the "Flight into Egypt". 

3. A pageant— "The Shepherd's Trail". The pa- 
geant was +he story of six youm* people who set o r 
on Christmas Eve to find the "Golden Key" — the 
key that would unlock life's worth-while treasures. 
This key was found by the sixth youth who served 
and helped "a st7*anger" instead of thinking of self. 

4. A Christmas play — "The Last Reindeer". This 
added a note of joy to the p7'o<rram for it told how 
Santa, who had decided not to visit the earth children 
this year because they had never thanked him, was 
finally persuaded by a note from a little boy thank- 
ing Santa for letting two of his reindeer stay with 
him for a whole year. 

Then came the most thrilling part of the whole 
evening — "the Tree". T wish that each one of yon 
could have been with us and enjoyed the Christmas 
spirit that existed. Each member of the Sunday 
School who had attended enough to become a full- 
fledged member received a useful gift, a joyful gift, 
and coufeetionaries. 

This year onr joyful gifts came from the Diocese 
of Pennsylvania, and the useful nifts from the Dio- 



ceses of New Jersey and Western North Carolina. 
We were sorry that none of our friends who made 
this part of our program a success could be with us. 
The joyful hearts and smiling faces of the people as 
they received their gifts reflected the true spirit of 
Christmas and their thanks to those who had sent 
the gifts. 

We were very glad to welcome our dear friend 
and former rector, the Rev. C. E. Williams. He 
told a very amusing and interesting incident which 
happened at the first Christmas entertainment at 
the mission. He also traced the growth and develop- 
ment of the mission since that time, and lauded our 
program. Mr. Williams will always have a place 
in the hearts of those people for it was he who has 
made the mission what it is. 

There were around one hundred and fifty members 
of the Sunday School this year. Of this number 
ten people attended every Sunday -and four missed 
only one Sunday during the year. 

JOHN W. HARDY 



ST. PAULS, BEAUFORT 



At a meeting of the Vestry of St. Paul's Church, 
Beaufort, shortly after the arrival of the new Rector, 
Rev. Lawrence M. Fenwiek, the Rev. Walter R. Noe, 
Executive Secretary of the Diocese, presented the 
Diocesan and General Church ' Program for 1935 
in a most clear, concise, and inspiring manner. It 
was decided to have a Parish Supper Meeting. 

Invitations were sent out and the supper was held 
in the American Legion Hut, December 19th, 6:30 
P. M. The Hut was decorated with long leaf pine 
and Christmas decorations. Several members of the 
choir led in the singing of some Christmas carols. 
Mr C. H. Bushall was Master of Ceremonies. The 
Rector presented Bishop Darst, our honor guest 
who contributed his usual ready wit and good humor, 
following this with a stirring, informing, and in- 
spiring message. An opportunity to make pledges 
for the coming year was given at the close of the 
mectingr. The Parish was divided into three zones 
by streets for the completion of the Canvass. A 
number of the Woman's Auxiliary volunteered to 
complete the Canvass. 

Mrs. Carrie Norcum is our Bishop's Pence Director 
and President of the Woman's Auxiliary.. Mrs. W. K. 
Hiimant was elected Leader of St. Catherine's Circle 
and Mrs. C. E. Hancock was elected Leader of St. 
Mary's Circle. 

We feel that the Parish Sunper Meethig meant 
much toward the enrichment of the life of cur Parish. 



JANUARY, 1935 



CHRIST CHURCH, NEW BERN 



Church School Growing 

Under the leadership of our new Rector, the Rev. 
Charles E. Williams, Christ Church is moving for- 
ward with renewed consecration and vigor to the 
prosecution of its tasks in every department. 

A new Parish House is out of the question at this 
time, but the Church School, under the superintend- 
ency of Mr. Frank N. Challen is growing and is be- 
coming sadly crowded, many classes having to meet 
in the Church. A Bible class for men and women 
has been started with Mr. Williams as teacher. 
Three new teachers have been added to the main 
school and decided improvements have been made 
to the Primary Department. The small tables have 
been painted, the windows at the end of the main 
room have been covered with windowphanie, giving 
the room a very churchly appearance. A fully 
equipped altar has been added for the use of the 
little children and large screens have been made 
and can be placed wherever necessary to separate 
the various classes and give the necessary privacy 
of individual class rooms. 

Woman's Auxiliary Had Successful Year 

The Woman's Auxiliary has just closed a most 
successful year under the leadership of Mrs. Frank 
S. Duffy. At the election last week. Mrs. R. A. Nunn 
was elected president for the year 1935, and the work 
will continue to progress under her able leadership. 
Good Work Being Done By Young People's 
Service League 

The Young People's Service League is as busy 
as ever. During Christmas week they held a most 
enjoyable party for a large group of underprivileged 
children. They had a specially decorated tree in 
the Parish House, and after the playing of games and 
telling of stories, the pile of presents under the tree 
was presented to the tiny strangers present. Re- 
freshments of cookies and cocoa were served, after 
which each child was presented with a stocking of 
candy, and an orange and apple to take home with 
him. A special motor corps called for the children 
and took them back home. 

The Bishop's Study Course, Valiant Christians 
We, is being discussed now and is being very much 
enjoyed. 

On Friday night, January 11th, the Y. P. S. L. 
xinder the chairmanship of James Bledsoe staged a 
novel and unique party. They opened a new night 
club entitled "Ye Okie Hoot Owle", with a very 
clever floor show composed entirely of League tal- 
ent, the pretty waitresses took orders for sandwiches 
and drinks and general dancing was indulged in 
between different acts in the show. A grand time 



was had by all. By way of further activities the 
League is selling tickets for an oyster roast and is 
planning to put on three one act plays. 

Miss Annie Lane Active Leader of League 

Mrs. Frank N. Challen, who is the senior coun- 
sellor of the League has been partially inactive since 
last Thanksgiving, due to ill health. Since that- 
time Miss Annie Lane, who is the Junior counsellor 
has been the active leader. The work has progressed 
splendidly under her leadership. "Miss Annie" as 
she is affectionately known to those in the League is 
making an imprint in the activities of our League 
that will live in the lives of our group. She has 
always arranged the supper meetings .of the League 
and has the art of making a dollar buy more than 
anyone we know. 

Feast of Lights 

On Epiphany Sunday night Christ Church held 
the Feast of Lights. There was a large congregation 
present and an augmented choir, rendered beautiful 
music. We had the shortened form of Evening 
Prayer and a short sermon, by the Rector. At the 
conclusion of this part of the service, the lights in 
the Church were darkened, the only lights being the 
candles on the altar. After the blessing of the can- 
dles, four servers approached the altar and the Rec- 
tor liahted their candles from a central candle on 
the altar. These servers then passed down the 
aisles and lighted the candle of each person sitting 
on the end of the pew, who in turn, lighted the others 
in the pew. In just a few minutes, the church was 
aglow with the flickering lights, symbolic of the 
manifestation of Christ to the C4entiles. After all 
the candles were lighted, the recessional Avas sung 
and the people went out into the street carrying 
lighted tapers with them. 

Every Member Canvass 

Our Every Member Canvass, while not entirely 
completed, has so far been satisfactory, and we look 
forward to a successful year in all lines, hoping to 
meet our obligations in full. 

A. H. C. 



ST. MARK'S, GRIFTON 



At St. Mark's Grift on the Auxiliary has raised 
funds and had the church repaired and painted on 
the outside. In addition to this they have made 
and used for local and diocesan purposes some seven- 
ty-five dollars. 

The Church School at St. Mark's has been reor- 
ganized and has a greatly increased number of mem- 
bers. Robert Mewborn is Superintendent of thr> 
Church School and indications are that they are 
poing to have a good year in their work. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



The Mission Herald 

ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 
Published Monthly except July and August at 

507 Southern Building 
WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor 

REV. WALTER R. NOE 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 

RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 

MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 
Advertising rates furnished on application. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to receive 
their papers, should promptly notify the Business Man- 
ager, giving when necessary, both the old and new ad- 
dress. 



TWENTIETH ANNIVERSARY 



On the sixth of this month, the Feast of the Epiph- 
any, our Bishop celebrated the twentieth Anniver- 
sary of his consecration as Bishop of East Carolina. 
He has rendered the finest service to the Diocese 
and the whole Church during these years. He has 
taught his people through love, not only to love him, 
but to love the whole work of the Church. We 
appreciate all that he has done for us, and wish for 
him many more years of useful service as our Bishop 
and friend. 



ANNIVERSARY TO BE CELEBRATED AT 
BEAUFORT 



At the meeting of the Annual Convention of 1934, 
a Committee was appointed to make the necessary 
arrangements for the celebration by the whole Dio- 
cese of the twentieth Anniversary of Bishop Darst's 
consecration. The Committee has decided that the 
best time for the celebration will be during the meet- 
ing of the Annual Convention, to be held in St. Paul's' 
Church, Beaufort. May 15 and 16, 1935. 



PROGRESS 



One sign of progress in the work of the Diocese 
of East Carolina is the increase in the number of 
self-supporting parishes. A few years ago, we re- 
ported eleven self-supporting parishes and the num- 



ber is now fifteen. Four parishes have assumed 
self support since the inauguration of the Nation- 
wide Campaign, and we have every reason to be- 
lieve that quite a number are almost ready to take 
this step. A part of our plan is to encourage as 
many fields as possible to support themselves so 
that the funds they are now receiving may be re- 
leased for important missionary work, and we feel 
that many of them are trying to cooperate with us 
in every way. 



1934 



While we did not collect enough money on the 
apportionments to meet our needs for 1934, many 
of the parishes and missions paid in full and a large 
number made substantial payments. 

The Treasurer's report will show that we paid 
the General Church Quota; the General Convention 
and Provincial Synod assessments and all of the 
items for the Diocese, with the exception of a note 
for $3,000 00. This means an increase of $3,000.00 
in our indebtedness. 



1935 



We have not received all of the Every Member 
Canvass reports from the parishes and missions, but 
those that have ■ come in show an increase in the 
amount that we might reasonably expect for the 
work of the Diocese and General Church in 1935. 
If the parishes and missions will help us with our 
debt by adopting the Bishop's Pence Plan, the 
amounts reported should be sufficient for other 
budget requirements during the year. The Every 
Member Canvass reports show that our people are 
deeply interested in the larger work of the Church 
and that they are willing to give it a full measure of 
their support. 



ANOTHER FIELD ASSUMES SELF SUPPORT 



Beginning this month, the Church of the Advent, 
Williamston and St. Martin's, Hamilton, the Rev. 
E. F. Moseley, Rector, will be self sustaining. 

This field has received aid from the Diocese for a 
number of years and the money will now be released 
for other missionary work in the Diocese. 

It is quite an accomplishment in these years for 
an aided field to raise sufficient funds for its own 
support and to continue to give to the work of the 
Diocese and General Church. We want to congratu- 
late Mr. Moseley and his people and to wish them 
much success. 



JANUARY, 1935 



REV. ISAAC E. BROOKS ELECTED PRESIDENT 

OF CLERICUC CLUB OF DIOCESE OF 

PENNSYLVANIA 



ST. PAUL'S, EDENTON 



Rev. Isaac E Brooks, a former /clergyman of this 
Diocese, now rector of Emmanuel Church, Holmes- 
burg, Philadelphia, has recently been elected Presi- 
dent of the Clericus Club of the Diocese of Penn- 
sylvania. 



REV. WALTER R. NOE TO HOLD CONFERENCES 
IN FLORIDA 



The Rev. Walter R. Noe has been asked by the 
Rectors of the Churches at Daytona Beach, Stuart, 
Fort Pierce, Vero Beach and West Palm Beach, in 
the Diocese of South Florida, to visit their parishes 
in the interest of the Church's Program. He will 
preach at Fort Pierce on Sunday, January 20th. 
and hold conferences in the other places, beginning 
Monday, the 21st. 



BISHOP DARST PREACHES AT DUKE 
UNIVERSITY 



On Sunday morning, January 13th, Bishop Darst 
preached in the new Chapel of Duke University. 

He will visit Chapel Hill, where we have a number 
of students at the University of North Carolina, and 
preach in the Church of the Holy Cross on Sunday, 
January 20th. 



FEAST OF LIGHTS 



Sunday evening, January 6th, in St. John's Church, 
Wilmington, the Rev. E. W. Halleck, rector, a most 
impressive service was held. It was the Epiphany 
service of the Feast of Lights. 

The Bishop of the Diocese was present and made 
an address. As it was the twentieth Anniversary 
of his consecration as Bishop of East Carolina, he 
spoke of the work of the Diocese during that period. 

The special service was said by the rector, assisted 
by the choir and the Three Wise Men. 

From the light on the altar, light was carried to 
all members of the congregation. 

During the recessional, the clergy marched down 
the center aisle, and the choir down the side aisles 
They were followed by the congregation, all bearing 
their light, which was carried by many of them to 
their homes. 

The service was attended by a large number of 
people. 



Mrs. Anna Rose Outland made a capital address 
to our Auxiliary at its meeting January 11th, giving 
both the plans of the Auxiliary for the year and 
suggestions as to programs and organization. Our 
Madam President is one of the very best speakers we 
have, and is always a welcomed visitor. 

We are especially pleased that our Every Member 
Canvass was a success. It was one of the most 
thorough we have had, and the response was grati- 
fying. 

John Washington Graham, Joseph H. Conger and 
Dr. M. P. Whichard are new vestrymen for 1935. 

Plans are under way for Lent. We will have 
daily services at 6:15 P. M. with special preachers 
on Thursday nights. 



ST. PAUL'S, GREENVILLE 



St. Paul's Parish observed the Feast of the Epiph- 
any by celebrating the Twentieth Anniversary of 
the Consecration of our beloved Bishop. Both at 
the early Celebration and at the Eleven o'clock 
Service the office was said with special intention 
for our great leader, and special thanksgivings for 
the blessing of having known his consecrated leader- 
ship for twenty years, and prayers were offered that 
God may spare him to us for many years to come. 
The rector delivered an address on the Historic Epis- 
copate, bringing to our attention the great blessing 
that we have in that the Church has so carefully 
preserved the Three Orders of the Sacred Ministry, 
and especially the blessing that we know in having 
as our leader and guide one so worthy of this blessed 

office. 

HOLY CROSS, AURORA 



A meeting of the congregation was held at the 
Parish House on the night of January the second. 

The meeting opened with the singing of a hymn, 
and the repeating of the Nicene Creed. Then our 
rector led in prayer. After which, our rector who 
presided, introduced the Rev. Charles E. Williams, 
rector of Christ Church, New Bern, who in turn in- 
troduced Mr. Frank N. Challen, an active and en- 
thusiastic layman of Christ Church. Mr. Challen 
gave a very interesting and enlightening talk on 
the financial condition of the Church. 

The Rev. Mr. Williams then gave the principal 
address of the evening, using as the basis of his; 
challenging-, helpful, and inspiring talk, these words 
"Is it well with thee?"? 

Both messages were sincerely appreciated and 
w 11 received by the congregation. 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD 



RETREAT. 

THE NATIONAL COUNCIL has been directed 
to reduce the Church's budget for 1935 by 
$386,885. The account of what it is being forced 
to do to carry out its instructions makes neither 
encouraging nor pleasant reading. The administra- 
tive costs of the work of the National Council have 
been reduced by $110,630, necessitating the resig- 
nation of several officers and the discharge of many 
office workers. And yet we demand an able and 
efficient central organization to govern and develop 
the worthy enterprises to which the whole Church 
is committed. All help has been withdrawn from 
the Seamen's Institute and from our churches in 
Europe. Appropriations for other objects such as 
the work among Negroes, the Girls' Friendly Society, 
the Church Periodical Club, and the World Confer- 
ence on Faith and Order have been severely reduced. 

Especially serious is the cut applied to the work 
of domestic and foreign missions, being $90,074 and 
$136,553 respectively. We have never at any time 
distinguished ourselves in supporting missionary 
enterprise, taking the Church as a whole, and now 
our record is remarkable only for what we are not 
doing, considering our potential strength and re- 
sources. The Church is alive or dead to the extent 
that she is or is not missionary, for the degree and 
quality of the Church's dedication to the cause of 
missions is one vital test of her love for her Lord. 
The time has come for us t(> ask ourselves whether 
or not our retreat on the missionary front is symp- 
tomatic of some spiritual illness which threatens to 
produce paralysis throughout the whole body. 

Applying this test, can we rest assured that the 
Church is fundamentally sound when we discover 
that last year out of every dollar given for all 
Church purposes 95£ cents were spent for parish 
and diocesan work and 4| cents for the work of the 
general Church at home and abroad? Can we re- 
main complacent when we learn that Bishop Bowe's 
■work in Alaska must sustain a $14,000 cut; that 
almost the entire appropriation for Bromley Hall 
in Liberia is wiped out and that the rest of the work 
is cut $4,200; that the Philippine field must get 
along- on $15,000 less and that Bishop Mosher is 
asked to postpone any work of expansion? 

"Retrenchment" is just a euphenism for "retreat" 
and there is no such thing as "a retreat to victory". 
There is not only much ground to be regained but 
olso we cannot continue to allow to so unheeded the 
appeals to open up new work which overwhelm our 
missionaries in all fields. It is a challenge which 
we must face with prayer and a determination that 
Cod's work shall not fail because we shall no longer 
fail Him. — Virginia Churchman. 



EPISCOPAL CHURCHMEN DONATE $30,417,501 



United Stewardship Council Reports This Amount 
Contributed During 1933 For All Church Purposes 



New York — The sum of $30,417,501 was given 
by Episcopal Church members in the United 
States for all Church purposes, parochial, diocesan, 
and general, in 1933, according to the annual report 
of the United Stewardship Council, which summar- 
izes the giving of twenty or more communions. 

The distribution of this thirty million between the 
local parish, the diocese, and the general Church 
(i. e., its national and missionary work) may be 
considered from three points of view: 

1. Totals. Of the thirty million, there was given: 

For parish work $26,835,133 

For diocesan work 1,830,777 

For the general Church 1,751,591 

(The third item is exclusive of trust funds and 
legacies.) 

2. On a per capita basis. The average per capita 

was $15.52. Each person gave: 

For the local parish $13.69 

For the diocese .93 

For the general Church .89 

(Support of the Episcopate is included in the 

first, item.) 

3. Each dollar given was divided as follows : 

For the parish . 88 cents 

For diocese and general Church, the dio- 
cese receiving a little over half 12 cents 

— Living' Church 



LETTER FROM CAPTAIN MOUNTFORD OF THE 
CHURCH ARMY 

January 7, 1935 

To the Editor 
Dear Sir : 

Church Army will be deeply grateful if, in an 
early issue of your diocesan periodical, you can 
make brief announcement of three or four items. 

1. Church Army Training Center and Headquar- 
ters, now located at 411 E. 14th Street, New York. 

2. Candidates for home missionary work are need- 
ed, men and women, ages 20-28: unmarried ; con- 
vinced Episcopalians, with keen love for souls; de- 
sirous of bringing the worst to the. Best. 

3. Money-help needed for training missionaries. 
Church Army training is almost without cost to 
candidates. 

Enquiries or checks should be addressed to the 
General Secretary, Captain B. Frank Mountford. 
414 E. 14th Street, New York. I am, 
Faithfully vours, 

B. FRANK MOUNTFORD Secretary 



JANUARY. 1935 



11 



WORLDLY TROUBLES 



THE TROUBLE with the world is not fundamen- 
tally economic but religious. There is an 
economic difficulty; we live in a world abounding 
in food and in material for clothing and shelter, yet 
millions are underfed, poorly .clothed, and abomi- 
nably housed. This should not be. The earth is the 
Lord's and the fu'llness thereof; as sons of God we 
have the right to God's gifts of food, clothing, and 
shelter. The distribution of these essentials is the 
present problem. 

But this problem will never be solved by political 
parties or by economic theories. It will only be 
solved by the acceptance of the Catholic Faith, which 
affirms that God is the Father of us all and that 
men are brethren. We are the children of God; we 
were created to enjoy companionship with our Fath- 
er. But only true companionship can exist where 
theve is unity of purpose and will. God's will for 
the world is more abundant life for all his children, 
not merely for a chosen few. God plays no favorites. 
We are so constituted by our Creator that we can 
only get the best results from our lives when we use 
them to accomplish this end. 

But people do not use their lives to this end; they 
therefore misuse them. The energy and ability of 
millions of people is used to gain what is intended 
but a means to an end. The world has confused 
the means with the end. The riches of the world — 
its metals, oils, grains and fruits — are but instru- 
ments with which we are to carve out our destiny. 
But the world has blindly considered the acquisition 
of these means as an end in itself. 

Life does not consist in the multiplicity of material 
possessions . Life is fundamentally a spiritual thing 
and therefore only the spiritual can bring lasting 
peace and satisfaction. There is no reality to ma- 
terial possessions because there is no permanency; 
they depreciate in value, decay, rust, and eventually 
crumble to nothingness. The personality which in- 
habits the body can never be satisfied with physical 
possessions, material pleasures. He demands, con- 
sciously or unconsciously, permanent and spiritual 
riches to satisfy the infinite desires. 

The world demands a New Deal. But only God 
can make all things New. Through union with the 
Incarnate Son we gain newness of life which was 
the purpose of the Incarnation. 

The riches of the world are but instruments by 
which we are enabled to serve God and man to the 
limit of our several abilities. Heaven, with perfect 
union with God, is the goal toward which wo nil 
iourney. But heaven is not a reward for a good life, 
r^t n p.rvnrli+inTi whore service will be untrammeled 
bv man's disobedience. The reward of life lies in 



the consciousness of work well done, of service ren- 
dered. The rake may gain social, political, or finan- 
cial supremacy; he may have a grand funeral with 
three cars of flowers ; but he missed the whole joy 
of living, of spending himself for God and humanity 
in an effort to fulfil his true destiny and make the 
world a better place for his living. The saint will 
spend most of his life unnoted by the world — in ser- 
vice and sacrifice, in kindness and gentleness, in 
self-control and discipline, in poverty and loneliness, 
in pain and misunderstanding; his death will never 
make the front pages of the newspaper, his Requiem 
Mass will be attended by a handful whose gratitude 
is deeper than words. But he lived gloriously, deep- 
ly- joyously, and abundantly. He used his life for 
the purpose for which it was created. 

The future of the rake and the saint are with God. 
fBut no thinking person can doubt that the rewards 
of the saint were more worth while than those of 
the rake. The life of the Incarnate Son is the yard- 
stick by which we measure life. Was the joy of 
his life greater than that of the millionaire whose 
strength was spent in amassing and holding his 
wealth? The answer to that question gives the 
reason for the Catholic Church. The Church exists 
to enable us, through sacraments and discipline, to 
approach that life of joyful service which was per- 
fected in the Incarnate Son. 

—REV. CARL I. SHOEMAKER, in The Angelus. 



FORWARD! 



This is the theme of a nationwide broadcast Sun- 
day, February 3, at 10 A. M., E. S. T., in the Episco- 
pal Church of the Air of the Columbia Broadcasting 
System, when the spirit and purpose of our Church- 
wide Forward Movement will be defined by The 
Right Reverend Henry Wise Hobson. D. D., Bishop 
of Southern Ohio, Chairman of the Joint commission 
on a Forward Movement. 

Hear this message over Station WKRO, Cincinnati : 
WABC, New York, and others of the Columbia 
Broadcasting Svstem. 



CHILDREN'S OFFERING WILL BE USED TO 
BUILD SHANGHAI HOSPITAL WARD 



Shanghai — A children's ward in the new building 
for St. Luke's Hospital, Shanghai, is the objective of 
the Birthday Thank Offering for the coming three 
years. St. Luke's Hospital for men and St. Elizr 
beth's for women, both in Shanghai, have long beeiv 
in need of new and better quarters. The plan is to 
combine the two hospitals, selling the present proper- 
ty and erecting the new building in a better location. 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD 



NOTES FROM FRIENDLY HALL 



THE NEW WORLD 



Although the time was short between the Thanks- 
giving holidays and the closing of the College for 
the Christmas vacation, we had time for much at 
Friendly Hall. Quite the most important thing, 
and an event which we had looked forward to with 
great interest, was Mrs. Outland 's visit on December 
3rd, when we had our regular .Auxiliary meeting. 
She gave us a wonderful account of the Convention 
at Atlantic City, and her talk proved an inspiration 
to us; she made us see the great work that lies 
before us if we truly "Be His Disciples", and we 
feel now that we are really a part of the very big 
organization which is working to carry out the com- 
mand of the Master. More clearly than ever do we 
realize the great benefit derived from these conven- 
tions every three years. 

It was a great disappointment to its that Mrs. 
Outland could not stay for our business meeting 
and the social hour which followed. The officers 
who were elected for 1935, and who will be installed 
at the January meeting, are : Margaret Fulton, 
President ; Sara Caraway. Vice President ; Vivian 
Carolus. Secretary; Camille Swindell, Treasurer; 
Maywood Wagner, Educational Secretary; Ellen 
Jenkins, Chairman Social Service; Catherine Thomp- 
son. Chairman Supply Work; Mary Tarry, Chairman 
Publicity: Elizabeth Wagner. U. T. 0. Custodian; 
Mary Williams, Field Secretary. 

At this season we wish to extend our thanks and 
appreciation to the many friends throughout the 
diocese who are sending us magazines and other 
publications from time to time. We are especially 
happy to know that the Spirit of Missions will come 
to Friendly Hall throughout 1935 as a Christmas 
gift from Mrs. Outland — a lovely thing she has been 
doing for several years. 

This year we decided not to have a Christmas tree 
at Friendly Hall, but to give everything we could 
toward social service work in the community — to 
help bring Christmas cheer to some needy family. 
This was handled largely through our Bible Class, 
with Mrs. Wicker in charge of the project. 

On the 'last Saturday night before the holidays 
Friendlv Hall looked very festive as Mrs. Williams, 
of the Woman's Auxiliary, had had the room beauti- 
fully decorated with evergreens and berries, to 
which we added red candles in brass holders. And 
we had a errand surprise for supper — Mrs. Malloy 
sent Friendly Hall, through Minnie, a most beautiful 
and delicious cocoanut cake. The occasion Avas an 
especially happy one as we had as our guests our 
Rector and Mrs. Wicker. 

MARY TALLY. Chairman Publicity 



On Sunday afternoon, February 10th, at 3:30, in 
the Masonic Theatre in New Bern, the Young Peo- 
ple's Service League of Christ Church, sponsored the 
Motion Picture "The New World", so successfully 
shown in Atlantic City, during the General Con- 
vention. 

This was the first showing of this remarkable eight 
reel film in this section of East Carolina. 

This picture is one of great interest, made at great 
expense by the Diocese of New Jersey for the Con- 
vention, and portrays in thrilling fashion the begin- 
nings of the American Episcopal Church and her 
history down throughout the years, showing many 
interesting scenes, among them the christening of 
Virginia Dare on Roanoke Island. The phonographic 
records which were played throughout the picture 
in Atlantic City were used. Special music will be 
furnished by the Community -choir of New Bern. 



THE CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD 
WELCOMES NEW RECTOR 



On Wednesday night. January 16, in the Parish 
Hall of the Church of the Cood Shepherd, Wilming- 
ton, the Parishoners assembled to welcome their new 
Rector, Rev. Edward C. McConnell and his young- 
wife. 

The main address was made by Rev. W. H. Milton, 
followed by short talks by Rev. Walter R. Noe, Ex- 
ecutive Secretaiy of the Diocese. Rev. John Benners 
Cibble, retired Rector of the Good Shepherd, Mr. 
Ashley T. St Amand, Layman in charge of De'lgado 
Mission: Mrs. Nora Hewlett, President Woman's 
Auxiliary ; Miss Ruth Zellars, for Senior Young Peo- 
ples ' Service League: Miss Helen Savage for Junior 
Y. P. S. L. 

These addresses were responded to by Rev. Mr. Mc- 
Connell in a few well chosen and feeling remarks. 
Mr. C. H Huband, Senior Warden, acted as Toast- 
master. 

The entire program Avas interspersed Avith A^ocal 
and instrumental music. 

At the end of the program the Avomen of the con- 
gregation served ice cream and cake. All agree 
they had an eA^ening of joy and good will. 



ST. JAMES', AYDEN 



The Woman's Auxiliary of St. James', Ayden, is 
preparing to put a neAV roof on the Church. Most 
of the money has been raised and it is hoped the 
work will be completed before Lent. 



JANUARY, 1935 



13 



REPORT ON THE BISHOP'S PENCE PLAN 



In spite of the Sales Tax which put so many pen- 
nies in circulation, pennies were running short in 
Washington, North Carolina before the middle of 
November. The Bank of Washington had to send 
to Richmond, Virginia for more pennies because the 
stores in Washington needed pennies to make change. 
They had to send again during December. 

The secret of this scarcity of pennies was dis- 
covered when the rector of St. Peter's and the Senior 
Warden called on the Cashier of the Bank, who hap- 
pened to be one of the Vestrymen, to help count the 
money from the Bishop's Pence Cans on the last 
Sunday in December. 

In order to see how well the Bishop's Pence move- 
ment would go over in the Diocese of East Carolina 
the Rector of St. Peter's Church got the Parish pre- 
pared for it by the first day of November 1934. By 
that day every family in the Parish was given a 
Pence Can. In order that every family might know 
just what to do with the Can, Message No.l, was 
sent to them. Message No. 2 informed them that 
Sunday, December 30th would be Pence Sunday and 
that all Pence Cans should be brought to the Church 
on that day and exchanged for new cans. The con- 
gregation responded so well that the attendance on 
Pence Sunday was almost double the average atten- 
dance. It took two strong Vestrymen to carry the 
Pence Cans up to the altar at the Offertory. 

When the cans were opened Sunday afternoon, 
the Cashier of the Bank of Washington remarked: 
''Now I know why we had to send to Richmond for 
pennies during the past two months. Moi*e than 
eight thousand pennies. — and there were many other- 
larger pieces of money also, — were taken from those 
Pence Cans. 

It is estimated that when all of the Pence Cans 
have been exchanged more than $200.00 will be the 
result. The movement has become so popular that 
the rector firmly believes that the money given to 
the Church by the people through the Pence Cans 
will increase every Pence Sunday. 

What is the result? Many families are asking 
the blessing at the table. Many families are becom 
ing more interested in the Church because of this 
little bit of religion. Many families are giving to the 
Church who formerly gave nothing. No one misses 
the penny. But three pennies a day from two hun- 
dred families, amounts to a goodly sum in two 
months. Figure it up for yourself. And that is 
money no one misses ; and that is money the Church 
would not get if it were not for the Bishop's Pence 
Cans. Here's hoping every Church family in the 
Diocese will use the Bishop's Pence Can so that the 



Diocesan deficit may be diminished and the financial 
burden of local Parishes and Missions might be 
lightened ! 



ST. STEPHEN'S, GOLDSBORO 



Successful Year 

The year 1934 has been a very successful one 
for St. Stephen's Church. The Services have been 
well attended. The choir has been enlarged and 
show the effect of regular rehearsals and much 
training. The various organizations have had their 
regular meetings and the members of each have at- 
tended well, 

Debt Paid in Full 

A small debt has been completely wiped out and 
the Church is now free from debt. Some repairs 
have been made and the property is now in good 
condition. 

Class of Nine Confirmed By The Bishop 

A class of nine was confirmed by Bishop Darst 
when he visited the parish on December 16th. Several 
new people have come to the city and some are al- 
ready taking an active part in the work of the 
Church. 

Rector Did Good Work as Director 
of Community Chest 

Our rector has been very active in the work of 
the city as well as in the parish. He was director 
of the Community Chest Drive and although the full 
amount of the objective was not raised, yet those in 
charge feel that the drive was very successful. He 
has also been a leader in trying to rid our city of 
slot machines and has succeeded in stirring up pub- 
lic opinion to the extent that the Board of Aldermen 
has promised to drive them out of the city. 

Rector Elected President of Raleigh Clericus 

Recently our rector has been elected President of 
the Raleigh Clericus, although he is not a resident 
of the diocese in which the Clericus is situated. 

Every Member Visitation by Women of The Parish 

The Women of the parish have also been active 
in arousing and maintaining interest in the work of 
the Church. Some of the outstanding features of 
which are : Every Member Visitation early in the 
year, calls upon new people who have come to the 
city, visiting the sick and aged, special invitations 
to attend the meetings of the various organizations 
and cooperating with the rector and vestry in every 
wav to the betterment of the parish. 

MRS. WM. H. SMITH 
President of Auxiliary 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD 



ST. PETERS, WASHINGTON 



John and Julia Dickinson chose to belong to St. 
Peter's Parish in Washington rather than to the 
colored Parish of St. Paul's. They occupied the 
front pew in the gallery. On Communion Sundays 
they waited until everyone else had communed and 
then came reverently and received their communion. 

Ten years ago John died and was buried from St. 
Peter's Church, white and colored friends attending 
the service. After that Julia had to come to Church 
alone. As long as her health permitted she was the 
lone occupant of the gallery in the same pew where 
she and John sat for so many years. On the night, 
of the Epiphany Julia died. She was between eighty 
and eighty-five years old. Prom her own Prayer 
Book the rector of St. Peter's commended her soul to 
God. She was reverently buried beside her husband 
John, the rector of St. Peter's reading the burial 
service. The pallbearers were members of the white 
family she had served so faithfully and friends of 
her own race. The next day in the daily column 
"Now and Then" written by John Bragaw in the 
Washington Daily News the following tribute was 
paid this faithful servant of Jesus Christ : 

We laid Loulie in her last earthly resting place 
yesterday. 

Almost sixty years ago she came to work for my 
mother, to nurse Little Sister, "to stay an' wash 
the cups and saucers up, an' brush the crumbs away, 
an' shoo the chickens off the porch, an' dust the 
hearth an' sweep." 

Then she stayed and nursed me when I came along 
and then Richard, and then the baby. And when 
we had all grown beyond babyhood she was still a 
member of the family, though she had long since 
married and moved to her own house. That strange 
tie that binds in devotion the faithful colored servant 
to her "white folks" is rarely broken save by death. 
Loulie and John, her husband, were our people, we 
were theirs. Nothing that concerned us was foreign 
to them. If we needed them we had but to call. If 
they needed us they came and were not turnd back. 

Her skin was not white, but her soul was. Faith- 
ful, loyal, honest, true, may light perpetual shine 
upon her. 

IN MEMORIAM 

THOMAS WHITMEL THOMPSON GRIFFIN 



Grace €hureh, Woodville, North Carolina, its Par- 
ish and Church School have suffered an irreparable 
loss in the death of its beloved member and vestry- 
man, Thomas Whitmel Thompson Griffin, December 
3. 1934. 



He was one of the most faithful of the 
members of our Bible Class, and we teachers wish 
to put on record our appreciation of his many good 
qualities, as a friend and neighbor, which he was to 
the two communities of Woodville and Lewiston. 

He will be greatly missed by us all, but we must 
bow to our heavenly Father's will and know that 
our loss is his gain. 

We extend our love and sympathy to his bereaved 
family and commend them to a loving Heavenly 
Father for comfort and peace. 

Rev. A. J. Mackie was assisted in the service by a 
dear friend and former rector of the deceased, Rev. 
Morrison Bethea who repeated the lovely hymn 
"Father in thy gracious keeping- 
Leave we now thy servant sleeping." 
as we left him under a blanket of beautiful flowers. 
Signed : MRS. T. I. PHELPS, Teacher 
STELLA PHELPS, Teacher 
BURGESS UBQUHART ^yHITEHEAD, 

Superintendent 



MRS. J. R. ASBY 



The Woman's .Auxiliary of Zion Parish desire to 
put on record their sense of sorrow and of loss by 
the death of Mrs. J. R. Ashy. 

She was unselfish and untiring in her services 
for her Church and community. Her love and de- 
votion for her family could not be surpassed and 
one of her noble characteristics was her sympathy 
and loyalty to her friends in sorrow. 

A precious friend from us has gone 
A voice we loved is still, 
A place is vacant in our hearts 
W^hich never can be filled. 
Signed : MRS. SAM SANDERSON 

MRS. F. G. JORDAN 
MRS. A. N. CUTLER 



MRS. LLOYD M. CROMARTIE 

On October 19, 1934 at her home in Elizabethtown, 
N. C, Eliza Beatty Robinson Oromartie entered into 
Life Eternal. 

Born in Fayetteville, N. C. she was baptized, con- 
firmed, and married in St. John's Church. Always 
a loyal daughter of the Church, and though for many 
years she has lived too far away to take an active 
part in parish work she faithfully remembered to 
send her United Thank Offering There is no Epis- 
copal Church in Elizabethtown, but, far and near, 
she was truly a Christian missionary. "Blessed are 
they which die in the Lord * * * that they may rest 
from their labors and their works do follow them". 



JANUARY, 1935 



15 



MISS FANNIE GREEN CAMPBELL 



The Woman's Auxiliary of St. John's Church 
records with sorrow the death, on October '30, 1934, 
of Miss Fanny Green Campbell. Through all the 
years, she was one of our most faithful and devoted 
members, and never, until she was too infirm to at- 
tend, did she fail to be at the meetings and to do 
tier part in every good work. 

We think of her always as being so sweet and 
gentle and kind in every way. Of her it may be 
recorded that she was "kept by the power of God", 
and was "found faithful" and hers is the crown. 

We know for her "at evening time it shall be 
light". 



(Continued from page 2.) 
The commission here and now asks all who will to 
pray for the Forward Movement. As soon as pos- 
sible the commission will issue forms of prayer suited 
for this purpose and will seek the permission of the 



bishops to authorize and commend such to all in 
their dioceses. The commission plans to issue a 
Lenten program of prayer, meditation, and reading 
upon the subject of discipleship." 

The commission as constituted under authority of 
General Convention includes: the Bishop of New 
York, the Bishop of Southern Ohio, the Bishop of 
Texas, the Bishop of Spokane, the Bishop Coadjutor 
of Newark; the Rev. Drs. Arthur Lee Kinsolving of 
Boston, Karl Block of St. Louis, Walter F. Tunks of 
Akron, Ohio, and Wilfred R, Hodgkin of Berkeley, 
California, and Messrs. Ralph Tlollenbeck of Ohio, 
Clifford P. Morehouse of Milwaukee, L. C. Williams 
of Richmond, Joseph A. Rushton of Chicago, Howard 
Seaman of Baltimore, John Hartman of Harrisburg, 
Harvey Firestone, Jr., of Akron, John Nicholas 
Brown of Providence, Carl Johnson of Colorado, 
and Albert Crosby of Minneapolis. Bishop Maxon, 
Coadjutor of Tennessee, also attended the initial 
meeting, and was asked to serve as an associate 
member. — Living Church 



FINAL, STATEMENT OF AMOUNTS PAID BY THE PARISHES AND MISSIONS FOR DIOCESAN A 

WORK FOR EIGHT MONTHS. MAY 1. 1»34. TO DECEMBER 31. 1034. 
CONVOCATION OF WILMINGTON ! 



Parishes 

Beaufort. St. Paul's 

Jlinton. St. Paul's 

Fayetteville. St. John's 

ioldsboro, St. Stephen's 

Hope Milf-s. Christ Church 

Kinston. St. Mary's 

New Bern. Christ Church 

Red Springs, St. Stephen's 
Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' 

Southport. St. Philip's 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd ... 

Wilmington. St. James* 

Wilming'ton. St. John's 

Wilmington. St. Paul's 

Oreiinlicd Missions 

Rurgaw. St. Mary's 

Faison, St. Gabriel's 



Expeo- 

•UStJC-Slf* 

140.00 
150.00 
1 000.00 
500.00 
45.00 
700.00 

ajwjo.ow 

50.00 

140.00 

140.00 

200.00 

6, 70O.00 

1,600.00 

700. oa 



35.00 



CONVOCATIION OF EDENTON 

Parishes 



Aurora, Holy Cross 

Ayden St James' 

Rath. St. Thomas' 

Relhnven, St. James' 

Rnnnerton. St. John's 

.""hooowinity. Trinity 

Columbia, St. Andrew's 

Creswell, St. David's 

Fd^nton St. Paul's 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church 

Fnrmvnie. Emmanuel 

3atesville St. Mary's 

Gr^pnvillo St. Paul's 

Grifton St. John's 

Hamilton. St. Martin's 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 

Tessama. ?.'ion 

Lake Landing. St. George's . . 
Plymouth, Grace Church .... 

Roper. St. Luke's 

Vanceboro. St. Paul's 



Parishes 

Favetteville, St. Joseph's 
Vew BeT-n. St. Cyprian's . . 
Wilmington, St. Mark's . . 



150.00 

200.00 

30.no 

250.00 

70.00 

80.00 

150.00 

200.00 

.1 000.00 

700.00 

150.00 

so oo 

700.00 

150.00 

30.00 

Son in 

80.00 

80.00 

140.00 

50 nn 

25.00 

CONVOCATION 



140.00 
200 00 
140 00 



Paid 

100.00 

9 65. 00 

343.51 
36.00 

660 00 

514.70 
33.00 

140.00 
66. 85 

167.04 
4 984.12 
1,111 98 

400.00 



19.07 
20.50 



15 

200. 

30 
130 

7S 

14 
110 
113 
1,000 
2'63 
150 

80 
433. 
150. 

30. 
187 

60. 

80 
1*0 

50 

25 



,00 

00 
00 
75 
.20 
.50 
.00 
96 
00 
«0 
00 
00 
57 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 

or 
oo 



Lumberton, Trinity 

North West, All Souls 

Pikeville 

Trenton. Grace Church 

Whiteville, Grace Church , 

Wrightsville. St. Andrew's 

Unorganized Missions 

Jasper, St. Thomas' 

Poliocksville, Mission 

Wilmington. Delgado Mission . 

Parochial Missions 

Campjjellton, St. Philip's , 

Kinston. Christ Church 

Tolar-Hart. Good Shepherd . . . 



Total 



Washington. St. Peter's 

Williams-ton. Advent 

Windsor, St. Thomas' 

Winton. St. John's 

Woodvllle. Grace Church 

Organized Missions 

Ahoskie, St. Thomas' 

Fairfield All Saints' 

Murfreesboro St Barnabas' . . . 

Roxobel St. Mark's 

?ladesville. St. John's , 

Snow Hill. St. Barnabas' 

fcnnburv. St. Peter's 

Swan Quarter Calvary 

Winterville, St. Luke's 

Veatesville. St. Mathews 

Unorganized Missions 

Avooa, Holy Innocents' 

Jamden, St. Joseph's 



Organized Missions 



Roihaven. St. Mary's 

Fdonton St. John's- Evangelist 

Fli^abrth City. St. Philip's 

Toldshoro. St. Andrew's 

Kinston, St. Augustine's 

Washington St. Paul's 



75 00 
80.00 
20 00 
45.00 
60.00 
80.00 



Total 

OF COLORED CHURCH WORKERS 

Unorganized Missions 

Aurora, St J'ide's 

Peaufort. St. Clement's 

.Greenville St. Andrew's 

Haddock'* Cross Rds.. S*. Stephen's 

Roper. St. Ann's 

Williamston, St. Ignatius' 

Wilmington "Brooklyn" Mission . . 

Wrightsvllie St. Augustine's 



5 

200. 

40 



28 
80 
14 
25 
60 
20. 



Total 

Grand Total 



<D GENERAL 


CHURCH 


Expec- 
tations 


Paid 


70.00 
20.00 


52.20 
20.07 
20.00 


20.00 
70.00 
70.00 


20.00 

70.00 

6.50 


20.00 

20.00 

5.00 


8.66 
5.00 

5.00 


15.00 
40.00 
50.00 


5.60 

40 00 
39.25 


$13,520.00 


9,854.35 


1 000.00 

200.00 

250.00 

40.00 

150.00 


1,000.00 

200.00 

148.74 

32.65 

150.00 


40.00 
10.00 
20 00 
80.00 
10.00 
80.00 
30.00 
20.no 
100. 00 
30.00 


40 00 

8.00 

14.31 

80 00 
5.00 
80 00 
30.00 
20.00 
100 00 
30.00 


40.00 

lo.no 


40.00 
10.00 


$ 6.705.00 


5,329.6 8 


40 on 




40 on 

gK 00 

25.00 
10.00 
10. 00 


36.40 

25 00 

15 00 

6.70 


in no 
10.00 


10 no 
10.00 


$ 1.010.00 


57o.m 


$21,235.00 


15,759.13 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD 



VIRGINIA EPISCOPAL 
SCHOOL 

LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 

Prepares boys for College and University. Splen- 
did environment and excellent corps of teachers. 
High standard in scholarship and athletics. Healthy 
and beautiful location in the mountains of Virginia. 
Charges exceptionally low. For catalog apply to: 

REV. OSCAR deWOLF RANDOLPH 

RECTOR 



ia,_, — „„_„„ — „_„„_„_„„_,„ — „,_,„ — „_,, „, — , „„_.j, 

I McCONNELL & CAUSEY 

FOR SERVICE 
Good-Year Tires Exide Batteries 

Quaker State Lubrication 

Telephone 827 12th and Market Sts. 

Wilmington, N. C. 



1, , „ m , i|.., l |iii„„ii n ut | ,ni i J,, ■ __ __ 

! 

Form of Bequest 



I I hereby, give, devise, and bequeath to 
| the Trustees of the Protestant Episcopal 
f Church in the Diocese of East Carolina 



I to be held by them in trust for. 






* — »•— 

*« — ■ — 



* 



ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Conducted for Negro Youth under the auspices of the Epis- 
copal Church. 

A four year accredited College Course is offered, leading to 
degrees of B. A. and B. S., including Pre-Medical work and 
Teacher Training for State High School Teachers' certificates. 

A College Preparatory Department, Training School for Nurses 
and School for Religious and Social Workers are connected with 
the College. 

Thorough training, healthy environment. Christian influences. 
For Catalog and information write — 

The Registrar 
ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE, RALEIGH, N. C. 



FOP. ALL COLDS USE 

VAPOR SALVE - - 25c 
NOSE AND THROAT DROPS 35c 



* 

i 



FLURENE 



MANUFACTURED BY 

FLURENE CHEMICALS, Ltd. 

Washington, North Carolina 



m ... »n in m, .... .... ...„• 



4-PLY CROCHET YARN 
50c PER POUND 

WRITE US FOR SPECIAL CLUB 
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TOLAR, HART & HOLT MILLS 

FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 

* ; , 4 

+. „ ,,, 



Meares Insurance Agency 

108 Princess Street 
Wilmington, N. C. 

. , + 

SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 
JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

An Episcopal School for girls — Have your daughter 
receive her education in a church school. 

Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, B. S., 
Principal 

Saint Mary's offers 4 years'. High School and 2 
years' College work all fully accredited by the South- 
ern Association. Also courses in Music, Art, Ex- 
pression, Home Economics, and Business. 

20-Acre Campus. Gym and Field Sports. Tennis. 
Indoor Tiled Swimming Pool. Horseback 



K'dinjr. Golf 



A. W. TUCKER, Business Manager. 



t 



<2*3.frb 



Library, 13. K. C. Jan. <f>6 
Chapel Hilli H. C. 



CA^- 




VOLUME XLIX 






mm 

Strain 



TLft^ini-tt|at- 1) tarrtf) • $ay • co mr -IRm 22= 1 7 



TO REV. THEODORE PARTRICK, JR 



We place your body in the tomb, 

To wait a distant day ; 

But down the years we'll often meet 

The things you gave away : 

Good fellowship, a helping hand — 

Encouragement and prayer — 

A firmer faith in God and man — 

And eagerness to share — 

Friendship and unselfish love, 

The best you had to give ; 

And on the hills and down the years 

This part of you will live. 

ALEX C. D. NOE 



FEBRUARY, 1935 





THE MISSION HEEALD 



DEPARTMENT OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 
YOUNG PEOPLE'S SERVICE LEAGUE 

Some of the Activities Reported in Their Paper 
"The Searchlight" 



"The Searchlight" Selected as Name of New 
Diocesan Monthly Paper 

From the list of more than sixty names suggested 
by leaguers of the diocese. "The Searchlight", con- 
tributed by Lib Ammons, diocesan secretary, was 
selected as the name of the diocesan paper which to 
date has borne a question mark as its only nomen- 
clature. 

Taking their lead from the name of the paper 
published at Camp Leach the staff of the organ felt 
"The Searchlight" to be most appropriate as a 
name for the serious publication of the Diocesan 

y. p. s. l. 

"Of course, the majority of the staff being of 
the so-called stronger sex, Miss Ammons' success is 
easily explained", says Billy Daniels, Exchange Ed- 
itor of the publication, "for the old saying that 
'love is blonde' still holds true." 

(Editor's note : Billy has been forgiven, upon his 
promise to repeat such a performance.) 
Kenneth S. Harley, Leaguer of St. John's Fayette- 
ville, Becomes Member of Church Army 

Kenneth S. Harley, former active member of St. 
John's League. Fayetteville, and winner of the cup 
for the best boy camper at Camp Leach in 1932 has 
recently become a member of the Church Army and 
is now stationed in the mountains of Virginia doing 
mission work. 

Kenneth, who is widely known throughout the 
Diocese because of his league work, received his early 
Chucrh Army training under Captain Earle Esta- 
brook, who was formerly stationed in East Carolina. 

In speaking of his work in Virginia, Kenneth say^ : 
"I am enjoying the work of Church Army just fine. 
At present. I am doing mountain mission work in the 
mountains of Virginia. I am stationed 26 miles from 
Charlottesville, on one side and about a mile and a 
quarter from the dropping off place on the other 
I have four missions to look after within a radius of 
about 12 miles, in which distance there are about 100 
families We have to visit these families on foot, as 
it is impossible to get near them in an automobile 
This makes visiting very difficult, not to count the 
wear and tear on my pedis (feet, to you.). 

"We have a lot of bootleggers up here, but are 
gradually winning them to Christ, and they are 
promising to quit making liquor. After T preached 
a sermon telling the people that it wasn't right to 
make a living bv bootlegging, one man came up to 



me and asked me if I would go with him and help 
him destroy his still. Well, certainly I said 'yes' 
Avith pleasure. (Feature me walking up the moun- 
tain-side with an axe in one hand and a Prayer Book 
in the other.) And after a hard walk through the 
swamps, water and bushes, we reached the place, and 
was the still well hidden? I can't figure out how the 
man found it himself. Well, you can bet your life 
I made a good job of destroying it. It was a 500 
gallon still, but after an hour's work it wasn't worth 
a dime. 

"This week I am trying to work up a confirmation 
class. Already we have S3 confirmed members in 
the community, so you can see the Church is grow- 
ing." 

The prayers and best wishes of the leaguers of the 
Diocese gc out to Kenneth in his work, and his ex- 
ample in taking so active a part in the work of 
spreading the Gospel is an inspiration to those of us 
who still hold the fort at home. 

St. Paul's and St. John's Teams Lead in 
Wilmington Basketball Set 

Basketball playing members of the Church Schools 
of St. Paul's and St. John's Churches of Wilmington 
are holding honors as high teams in the Senior 
Church School Basketball League of that city, which 
is sponsored by the Y. M. C. A. Competing against 
the four other teams of the league, made up of mem- 
bers of churches of other denominations, these two 
teams are fighting for first place, with St. Paul's at 
present being one game ahead. 

Here and There Around the Diocese 

Christ Church, New Bern, reports great success 
in a joint <lebate between the two teams each from 
the New Bern and the Washingon Young People's 
Service Leagues, on the query: "Besolved. That the 
name of the Protestant Episcopal Church of America 
should be changed to the Episcopal Church of 
America. 

11 is interesting to note that the newspaper account 
of the debate stales that both negative teams won. 

St. John's Fayettevillo, reports a most successful 
month, some of the activities being: payment of ap- 
portionment, (Congratulations) services at County 
Home, distributing Mission Herald to each home in 
parish, selling Christmas cards, mailing packages of 
Ofn-islmas cards to ea^h of East Carolina's mission- 
aries, that they might have some to send their friends, 
sending gifts in Ch?-istmas box to a mission in South 
Carolina, sponsoring Midnight Candle Service 
Christmas Eve. 

St. Paul's. Wilmington, has begun an innovation 
which might well be copied bv other leagues. Hold- 
(Continued on Page 15) 



The Mission Herald 



VOLUME XLIX 



WILMINGTON, N. C, FEBRUARY, 1935 



NUMBER 2 



BISHOP'S LETTER 



^ye have every reason for encouragement as we 
face the opportunities of another year and if we will 
only face those opportunities with faith and courage 
and determination, I am satisfied that we can make 
1935 one of the most glorious years in the history 
of our diocese. 

At the recent meeting of our Executive Council 
it was reported that the parishes and missions of 
the diocese, with practically no exceptions, had in- 
creased their pledges over those of last year thus 
making it possible, not only to hold the line, but 
to move forward hopefully with our plans for a 
further extension of the work committed to our 
hands. 

As one of the means for the reinvigorating and 
rehabilitation of our work, I earnestly commend the 
plans and purposes of the "Forward Movement" 
inaugurated at the General Convention last fall. 

This initial message of the movement is contained 
in the little manual "Discipleship" and I trust that 
you will make it your manual and guide during the 
coming Lenten Season. 

For the first time, perhaps, the whole Church has 
been called to a corporate Communion on Sunday, 
March 10th, and I pray that all of our people may 
respond to that call with earnestness of heart and 
seriousness of purpose on that day. 

On Sunday, January 13th, at 11 A. M., I had the 
privilege of preaching to a large congregation in the 
beautiful Chapel of Duke University. 

On the same day at 7 P. M. I visited St. Mary's 
House, the Student Center of the Woman's College 
in Greensboro, and addressed our Episcopal Group. 

On Sunday, the 20th, I preached in the Chapel of 
the Cross, Chapel Hill at 11 A. M. and led the dis- 
cussion at a Student Forum in the Parish House 
that evening. 

On Monday, the 21st, at noon, I met with the 
Committee on the Restoration of St. Thomas' Church. 
Bath, in Raleigh. On the evening of the same dav. 
I presided at the Annual Banquet of the North 
Carolina Alumni of the Virginia Theological Semi- 
nary in the Parish House of the Church of the Good 
Shepherd, Raleigh. 

On the 23rd and 24th, I attended the Annual 
Meeting of the Woman's Auxiliary of the Dioeeso 
in Christ Church, Elizabeth City, celebrating Holy 
Communion and making an address at 10 A. M. on 



the 23rd, and celebrating the Corporate Communion 
on the morning of the 24th. 

Owing to the cold, rainy weather, the attendance 
at the Convention was not as large as usual, but the 
program was of an unusually high order, the spirit 
of the Convention was marvelous and the feeling of 
oneness with our Lard and His purposes was abun- 
dantly manifested. 

Following the Auxiliary meeting I spent a few 
days with my old friend and classmate, the Rev. Dr. 
J. M. Robeson in his attractive little home on Lake 
Apopka in central. Florida. 

While in Florida I received the sad news of the 
death of my dear friend, Theodore Partrick, and 
the message brought genuine sorrow to my heart 
as he was in a very real sense, one 'of my own boys. 
I received him as a Candidate for the ministry, 
ordained him as Deacon and Priest and assigned 
him to his first work in East Carolina. 

I have kept in close and loving touch with him 
during his brief, but blessed ministry and have 
rejoiced in his fruitful work, as a faithful loving 
pastor, who followed humbly and joyfully in the 
footsteps of his Master, Christ, 

May he rest in peace and may light perpetual 
shine upon him. 

Faithfully and affectionately, 

Your friend and Bishop, 

THOMAS C. DARST 



BISHOP'S APPOINTMENTS 



February 24th — March 31st 
February 24— St. Barnabas', Snow Hill A. M. 
Emmanuel, Farmville P. M. 
28 — Regional Conference, Charlotte 
March 3 — Holy Cross, Aurora A. M. 

St. John's, Bonnerton Afternoon 
St. Jude's, Aurora P. M. 
4 & 5 — Possible ordinations 

9 — Executive Committee, Y. P. S. L. — ■ 

New Bern 
10— St. Paul's Beaufort A. M. 

St. Clement's, Beaufort Afternoon 
12— St. Andrew's, Mt. Pleasant, S. C. P. M. 
13— Grace Church, Charleston, S. C. P. M. 

18-22 St. Bartholomew's, New York 

2-1 St. Paul's, Wilmington A. M. 

St. John's, Wilmington P. M. 

31 Christ Church, New Bern A. M. 

St. Cyprian's. New Bern P. M. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



REPORT OF ANNUAL MEETING OF WOMAN'S 
AUXILIARY 



The theme of the Triennial Meeting of the Wo- 
man's Auxiliary to The National Council in Atlan- 
tic City was, "IF WE BE HIS DISCIPLES". "Close 
to Christ and Forward with Him" was added to 
this theme at the 48th Annual Meeting of the Wo- 
man's Auxiliary to The National Council, Diocese of 
East Carolina, held in Christ Church, Elizabeth City, 
January 23, 24, 1935. 

Bishop Darst Speaks on Discipleship 

The meeting opened with the celebration of the 
Holy Communion with Bishop Darst as celebrant. 
After Communion the Bishop gave an informal talk 
on Discipleship. He discussed Christ as a compan- 
ion, and taking Peter as an example of a person 
wandering from Christ, he brought the scene of the 
trial of the Master vividly before the women; then 
Peter's denial, saying, "If he had held the hand of 
the Christ that night, he Avould not have denied 
Him." 

Welcome and Response 

Mrs. W. D. (Hover, President of the hostess Aux- 
iliary graciously welcomed the delegates and visitors 
to the meeting. Mrs. A. T. St.Amand of St. Paul's, 
Wilmington, responded. 

President's Annual Report 

Mrs. Outland began by asking "Have we grown in 
1934?" She explained that the program was divi- 
ded in three main headings, Christian Citizenship. 
Development of the Life of the Spirit, and Missions 
in this Age. 

The following is a list of some of the activities 
she had a part in last year. Lake Kanuga, Auxiliary 
Day at Camp Leach, Clergy Conference, the fail 
canvass and preparations for the Triennial Meeting 
in Atlantic City. 

Mrs Outland expressed her appreciation of the 
privilege of attending the Triennial as a delegate 
from the Auxiliary. One of her deepest impressions 
was the realization of the intimate share all of us 
have in the Church's program. She discussed thr 
value of the intimate contact with the leaders in the 
Church. "Our Greatest need is the awakening of a 
sense of responsibility." 

The recommendations for the coming year are 
the study of last year's program, study of Triennial 
address, every woman attend a retreat or conference, 
and last, but not least, emphasize the Life of the 
Spirit. 

Provincial President 

"If we would go forward, we must e:o deeper" 
said Mrs. MacMillan. There are three principles in 



the development of the life of Discipleship, the su- 
premacy of God, .the importance of each person, 
God's child and mutual self sacrifice. The highest 
endeavor of the Woman's Auxiliary is sharing Him 
with others. A plea was made to the women to 
keep the work of the Auxiliary on the highest plan< T 
possible. 

Lake Phelps Mission 
In the absence of Miss Lona Belle Weatherly, 
Bishop Darst gave a glowing report of the Mission 
at Lake Phelps, saying it is one of the finest pieces 
of missionary work in the United States in the last 
ten years. 

Principal of St. Mary's Talks 
Mrs. Cruikshank reported a thirty percent in- 
crease in enrollment this year. There are twenty 
seven girls from the Diocese of East Carolina 
She also reported a scholarship available in this 
Diocese, the examination for which will be held in 
April. 

Reports From Delegates to Triennial Meeting- 
Five minute reports were given by the following 
delegates and visitors to the Triennial Meeting: 

Mrs. J. Q. Beckwith, Missions; Mrs W. S. Cara- 
wan. Christian Citizenship; Miss Caroline K. Myers, 
Development of the Life of the Spirit; Mrs. S. P. 
Adams, Resolutions, and New Business; Mrs. W. N. 
TilHnghast, Young People. 

They thanked the Auxiliary for the privilege of 
representing the Diocese of East Carolina. Each one 
ably presented her subject and showed so much en- 
thusiasm, the audience regretted there was only five 
minutes allotted to each person. 

Executive Secretary of the Department of 
Religious Education 
Rev. Daniel A. McGregor talked to the women 
about Religious Education. He said he was not in- 
terested primarily in the machineiy of his depart- 
ment but in the products; compared workers in the 
department with the mechanics who keep the ma- 
chinery oiled. He declared the ethical and spiritual 
life most important in the development of children 
"If the State cannot guarantee this in its school 
system the Church must." "Religious Education 
is like the barb of the shaft of an arrow. " The 
present public school educational system is without 
facilities to give children the kind of edxtcation they 
should have. The Church of Christ is much 'Con- 
cerned about this and rightly should be. He stressed 
the importance of developing the right attitude Ir> 
the child. The most powerful influence is in t^e 
home, because the children observe and imitate ih" 
unconscious attitude of the parents. Other powerful 
influences are the street, the movie and the Funnies 



FEBRUARY, 1935 



Reports of Convocations 

The reports from "the three convocations were 
splendid, showing improvement along each line ol: 
endeavor. Each president gave as the greatest 
problem, non-attendance at the meetings of the 
various branches. 

■ The Auxiliary of St. Paul's, Wilmington, St. 
James', Ayden. St. Luke's, Winterville, attained a 
place on the honor roll for the year 1934. 

Delegates Brave the Weather to Attend 
Mass Meeting- 
All day Wednesday the rain came down in torrents 
■ — well maybe it wasn't torrents, but all the way to 
Elizabeth City when one was trying to steer clear 
of that painted line around curves, one thought it was 
torrents. Toward night the North Wind came to 
the center of the state and played his part, sending 
the mercury down, down. The rain froze on the 
windshields; icicles hung from the ice covered run- 
ning board. Many hot applications were requirec" 1 
to remove the sheet of ice from the wind shield. A 
few Avere late getting to the mass meeting. In spite 
of the rain and north wind there was a goodly at- 
tendance. 

Evening Service 
Dr. McGregor in his sermon said the women hav<* 
made a tremendous contribution to the Church of 
Christ. The keynote of the sermon was fellowship. 
He discussed the condition of the world today, show- 
in? Iioav closely we are associated with our far away 
neighbors through modern inventions, the telephone, 
radio, wireless and the quick means of transportation 
from one country to another. He followed this 
discussion with the idea that we who belong to the 
family of God are the messengers of Christ, and we 
must realize our responsibility in helping to preserve 
a world wide fellowship. 

Corporate Communion Service 
The second day of the Annual Meeting of the 
Woman's Auxiliary began with its regular corporate 
communion at 7:30 A. M. with Bishop Darst cele- 
brant. 

The Bishop's Fund was placed on the alms basin, 
and at this time the names of the Auxiliary members 
who have nassed on during the year were read anrl 
prayers offered for them. 

Messages From Department Chairmen 
Forward looking messages were given Wednesday 
and Thnrsdav by the following: 

Mrs. John E. F. Hicks, Christian Social Service De- 
portment; Mrs. P. T. Anthony, Surrnly Department: 
Mi«!R Jessie TVaee. Church Periodical Club: Mrs. 
John B. Cranmer. Field Department; Mrs. Henrv 
J. MacMillan, Publicity Chairman ; Mrs. A. B. Houtz 
Educational Department. 



Camp Leach 

Rev. George S. Gresham, Director of Camp Leach 
during the past summer, spoke of several changes to 
be made at Camp Leach and asked the general in- 
terest and support of the women in this work. 
Report of Nominating Committee 

Mrs. E. B Ficklen, Chairman; Mrs. S. P. Adams. 

The nominating committee recommended the re- 
election of Mrs. Fred Outland as President of the 
Auxiliary and Miss Caroline K. Myers, U. T. 0'. Cus- 
todian, theii^terms of office having expired at this 
time, and nominated Mrs. Bessie Stuart of Elizabeth 
City, Supply Secretary. Mrs. W. A. Darden of Green- 
ville, Publicity Chairman. 

Delegates to Synod 

The Nominating committee recommended the fol- 
lowing delegates to the Synod to be held at Lexing- 
ton, Kentucky : 

Mrs. Fred Outland, Mrs. W. S. Carawan. Mrs. J. Q. 
Beckwith, Mrs. J. L. Shackleford, Mrs. W. N. Ti'l- 
linghast. 

Alternates : Mrs. John Bonner, Mrs. J. E. F. Hicks, 
Mrs. Donald MacRae, Mrs. W. D. Glover. 

The report of the nominating committee was adopt- 
ed as read. In accepting her office for another 
term of three years, Mrs Outland said, "If you want 
m'e to go forward with you, I shall do so." She 
spoke very feelingly of the pleasure and help she 
had received in working with the women of the 
Auxiliary. 

Mrs. Charles R. Grandy of Norfolk, Va. was intro- 
duced by the president and spoke briefly of her visit 
to the East, and particularly her visit to the Chapel 
at Tokyo, which was built by the gold and silver 
offerings presented by the women. 
Japan 

Miss Clara Neely was introduced by Bishop Darst 
as the first woman missionary sent out by the United 
Thank Offering to Japan. 

Miss Neely expressed her pleasure in having the 
privilege of speakinsr to the women of the Auxiliary. 
She spoke briefly of the trials and discouragements 
and also the joys of being a missionary. "The 
pronhecv that Christ should rule the world is being 
fulfilled in Japan today." Miss Neely told some of 
the interesting experiences and incidents which hap- 
pened duriner her work as an evangelist. She de- 
clared the pioneer period of missionary work is over 
and that the Church is well organized. We were 
told that Japan is the greatest reading nation in the 
world. She recommended to the women the mis- 
sionary study of Japan. 

Installation Service 
The Installation Service was introduced into the 
meeting, following Miss Grace Lindley's suggestion. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



at which time the officers came forward, knelt at 
the Altar rail, and Bishop Darst laying his hands 
upon each candidate, installed her in the office to 
which she had been elected in the Woman's Auxili- 
ary. Regarding this service there were few com- 
ments, chiefly because everyone had been too deeply 
touched; words seemed inadequate to express what 
one felt. 

MRS. W. A. DARDEN, 

Publicity Chairman. 



GALILEE MISSION, LAKE PHELPS 



TO THE SOCIETIES IN THE CONVOCATION OF 
WILMINGTON 



Dear Co-Workers : 

We are entering upon another year of our Auxili- 
ary work. Let us make it the best and finest yet. 
May we answer the challenge "If ye be My Disci- 
ples" by making "His Kingdom our Vision" and 
"Progress our Watchword". May we evaluate our- 
selves and our work on the basis of putting first 
things first, and go forward as never before. May 
Ave say from our hearts : 

"Help me, God, this year to crown with beauty 

Within my thoughts to write thine own best will. 

To thee anew I give myself for duty 

Take me dear Lord, and all thy plans fulfill." 

I deeply regret that on account of the unusually 
cold weather so few of our women could attend the 
Annual Meeting in Elizabeth City. It was a most 
informing meeting and you would have gained much 
to help you in carrying on your work. When you 
receive the Auxiliary Annual, study it carefully. 

The World Day of Prayer will be observed on 
March 8th, this year. In unity there is strength. 
Plan to observe this day and let us remember in our 
prayers all of the Workers in His Vineyard. 

Enclosed you will find your Apportionment for 
1935. Send all money for your Apportionment to 
Mrs. John A. Onion, Box 713, New Bern, N. C. Those 
of you who could not attend the Animal Meeting and 
have an offerine: for the Bishop's Fund, send it also 
to Mrs. John A. Cuion our Diocesan Treasurer. 

May I suggest that at one of your meetings you 
study the different Projects in the Apportionment. 
You will find that through it you are working in 
three of the Five Fields of Service, and that it is a 
real privilege rather than an obligation. 

If I can be of service, T shall be happy to visit 
any Auxiliary that wishes me, just let me know a 
week or two before your meeting. With love and 
best wishes to you and for you in your work for 
Him. I am. 

Faithfully yours, 

ANN P. BECK WITH 



Miss Lona Belle Weatherly, our U. T. O. worker 
at Galilee Mission, Lake Phelps, is spending her vaca- 
tion in Norfolk, Va. On account of the condition of 
the roads our school at Lake Phelps is closed during 
the winter months and is open during the summer. 
While in Norfolk, Miss Weatherly is taking a short 
course in filing and typewriting. 



REV. GEORGE S. GRESHAM TO SPEAK TO 
YOUNG PEOPLE'S SERVICE LEAGUES 



The Rev. George S. Gresham, who is chairman of 
the Department of Religious Education of the Dio- 
cese and Director of two of our Camps has accepted 
invitations to address a number of the Young Peo- 
ple 's Service Leagues. He expects to be at Fayette- 
ville and other points in the near future. It is hope r 
that he will be able to visit all the Leagues before the 
time for the summer camps. 



ST. THOMAS', ATKINSON 



At a recent visitation of the Bishop, the members 
of St. Thomas', Atkinson, asked for the services of 
a clergyman for at least the fifth Sundays. There 
are only a few members of our Church at Atkinson, 
but the services are attended by many people of the 
community. Several people are now interested in 
confirmation. The church building was practically 
filled for the Bishop's service. 



ST. PHILIP'S, SOUTHPORT 



The Rev. and Mrs. A. H. Marshall are now at 
Southport. Mr. Marshall began his work there and 
at Whiteville on the first Sunday in February. The 
rectory is being repaired but will be ready for them 
in a few days Mr. Marshall will give two Sunda^ 
afternoon services each month to All Souls', North 
West. 



A PERFECT LIFE 



A perfect life is not attained in a day. Men can 
not take short cuts, or take a bee-line for the King- 
dom of Heaven. If we had our way, we should have 
the bud, the blossom, and the ripened fruit at the 
same time. But this is not God's method. He gives 
us "first the blade, then the ear, afterward the full 
corn in the ear." Character is a growth and it re- 
quires time to perfect the full rounded Christian.— 
I). 0. Tomlinson. 



FEBRUARY, 1935 



THEODORE PARTRICK, JR. 



MANY ATTEND FUNERAL FOR MISS COLLIES 



Never a quieter gentleman came to Raleigh as a 
minister than Theodore l'artriek, Jr., who took not 
the world for his parish but his parish for his whole 
world. The city would never have known him if it 
had waited to feel his presence in any lash of words 
from his pulpit. But the city — a city that extended 
from Hayes Barton to the penitentiary, from the 
proudest Episcopalians, born to the pews as to the 
purple, to the most churchless boy lost in crime — ■ 
did know him and love him, not as a man in a pulpit 
but as a man close at hand in trouble, gentle and 
simple and kind, who made it his ministry to bless 
men in their suffering and not to terrify them in 
their sins. 

He was not a great scholar though he had a schol- 
ar's love for the tradition of his Church and of his 
country and of the English past which lay behind 
them both. Last summer in a belated vacation from 
a crowded ministry he found at last the time and the 
money to indulge his old enthusiasm and his intelli- 
gent curiosity about the past of the traditions in 
which he stood. He came back content and 
strengthened to the work of his heart. 

He was not a great preacher. He often said so 
himself, sometimes unduly depreciating his ability. 
He had no ambition to be a great preacher. He 
wished rather to speak in direct helpfuness to indi- 
vidual men and women who needed to be helped. 
His distinction and Raleigh's loss is to be found in 
the fact that he had, as few men Raleigh has known 
have had, that genius for goodness which is the 
greatest art of all. 

Raw-boned in his clericals and almost laconic in 
his language, he was a man without the least pre- 
tentions to priestliness. There was no oil of unction 
on his tongue. There was not the least solemnity 
about him. He laughed briefly but heartily and 
often. He saw life with both sympathy and humor. 
There was about him a shyness based in true humil- 
ity which both taught him against intrusion and 
gave wisdom to his sympathy. 

His dying somehow makes heaven simpler, more 
certain, more credible. Beyond his death nothing 
else is conceivable. In the obviousness of his good- 
ness and his faith immortality is no more than a 
man opening a door, certain of welcome. So as we 
m^ss him in his death, also from his death we may 
take heart. As he followed in so much gentleness 
and humility and faith One greater than himself, so 
we may follow him and hope for welcome, too. 

Editorial — News and Observer. 



Simple Episcopal Ritual Is Used At Service At 
St. Stephen's 



Funeral service for Miss Sue Collier, 87, who died 
at her home on North James Street, was held Wed- 
nesday afternoon at 4- o'clock at St. Stephen's Epis- 
copal Church, the church in which she labored with a 
labor of love for more than three score years. 

Rev. George S. Grehsam, rector of the church was 
in charge of the service. Burial was in Willow Dale 
cemetery. 

A large crowd of friends and relatives attended 
the service and followed the body to the cemetery for 
the final rites. Rev. Mr. Gresham used the Episcopal 
burial service. 

Honorary pallbearers included the members of the 
St. Stephen's vestry: G. C. Royall, John Roberts, 
F. F. Fagan, James N. Smith, B. L. Meade, H F. Lee, 
Easley Pace, E. E. Eustler, K. C. Royall and D. W. 
Davis. Two members of the vestry — Hugh Dortch 
and J. E. F. Hicks — were among the active pall- 
bearers. Other active ones : James Southeralncl 
H. L. Bizzell, H. B. Parker and F. P. Parker, Sr. 

Miss Collier, one of the pioneer women of Golds- 
boro. is survived by a number of nephews and nieces 
Misses Susan and Elise Fulghum, Susan and Cora 
Fuller Collier, with whom she made her home, Mrs. 
W. B. Cobb, George D. Collier of Omaha, Neb, John 
Collier and Alex Fulghum of Chicago. 

Miss Collier had been ill for a number of months 
but even as late as December continued to visit hev 
church for worship. 

A daughter of the late George W. and Caroline 
Oliver Collier, she was born at old Everettesville 
which stood near Crescent Lake. While she was yet 
a girl her parents moved to Goldsboro and here she 
had resided, loved and respected by all. 

Two Gioldsboro Woman's organizations saw their 
birth in the interest of Miss Collier. She established 
the Thomas Ruffin Chapter of the United Daughters 
of the Confederacy and the local committee of Co- 
lonial Dames and later held several honorary offices 
in the local and state organization. At the time of her 
death she was the oldest member of the Colonia' 
Dames in North Carolina. 



ORDERS FOR PALMS 



Send your Palm orders to Woman's Auxiliary, 

$4.00 per hundred F. 0. B, Aurora, N. C. 

Write MRS. PAUL T. SPARROW 



THE MISSION HERAI.il 



The Mission Herald 

ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 
Published Monthly except July and Augruat at 

607 Southern Building 
WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor 

REV. WALTER R. NOE 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 

RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 

MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 
Advertising rates furnished on application. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to receive 
their papers, should promptly notify the Business Man- 
ager, giving when necessary, both the old and new ad- 
dress. 



LENT 



Like Bart'imaeus, the world sits in blindness by 
the wayside, begging. The blindness is that of des- 
pair, born of a materialism that has failed; the beg- 
ging is for a way out, a restoration of the vision of 
the true spiritual values by which alone a world, 
like an individual, can set a straight and certain 
course. 

To the world, and to each individual in the world, 
as to blind Bartimaeus, comes the message, "Jesus 
of Nazareth passeth by." Lent brings us in a 
peculiar way, the opportunity to touch the hem of 
•the Lord as He passes by on His divine mission, and 
pauses a moment to ask, "What wilt thou that I 
shall do unto thee?" Will ye have the faith of 
that beggar? Can anyone doubt that, if we ask in 
that faith, He will grant us that spiritual vision 
that is so greatly needed in the world today? 

But we must ask IN FAITH. Not one of the 
miracles recorded in the Gospels was performed 
without an act of faith and cooperation on the part 
of some human being. The water was not changed 
into wine at Cana until the servants obeyed the 
apparently absurd injunction to fill up the water 
pots with water. The leper was not cleansed until 
he expressed his faith: "Lord, if Thou wilt, Thou 
canst make me clean." The centurion, asking that 
his servant be healed, had such faith that he did 
not oven ask our Lord to turn aside from His mission 



in order to perform the miracle: "Lord, I am not 
worthy that Thou shouldest come under my roof, 
but speak the word only, and my servant shall be 
healed." And in the greatest of all miracles, when 
the angel appeared unto Mary with the message of 
the Incarnation, it was her faith that made possible 
the clothing of the Divine Word in human flesh: 
"Behold the handmaid of the Lord; be it unto me 
according to thy word." 

And so this Lent Jesus of Nazareth passeth by. 
The troubles of the world, the sorrows and cares of 
each individual in the world, are matters of vital 
concern to Him. Best of all, He can transmute them 
into means whereby Ave achieve that greatest of all 
blessings, the Vision of God. But He has' endowed 
us with freedom of will and the power to choose 
between good and evil. With the freedom of will 
comes the capacity for faith; with the power to 
choose comes the responsibility for a right choice. 

The Church has set apart the season of Lent for 
an intensive cultivation of our faith. As the athlete 
strengthens his body by training, by diet, and by 
exercise, so must we strengthen our souls and in- 
crease our faith by prayer, by fasting, and by alms- 
giving. Lent gives us the opportunity to do these 
things. 

— Living Church 



THE RIGHT ATTITUDE TO LENT 



One does not need to advocate a program for 
Lent so much as to urge a disposition towards it. 
If Ave look at our spiritual privileges aright we 
shall be glad to get away from the noisy clatter of 
society, the hard machinery of business, and the 
cold search for knowledge, just as a booklover who 
has been compelled to do other things is grateful 
for a book and a nook in which to enjoy it. 

Devote a certain time each day to talking Avith 
God. teliing Him eA r erything and seeking His divine 
help in your problems. 

Bead or, better, study your Bible daily. Give up 
light reading in order to make this possible. For 
example, take one Gospel and make yourself familiar 
with Christ's earthly life and hoAV He went about 
doing good. 

Try to make Lent a spiritual adventure, like a 
trip into the woods or a Adsit to some place of beauty. 

It is only as Ave search for the deeper truths in 
religion that we are able to comprehend the won- 
derful sunrise of Easter Day. Beligion like other 
pursuits gives her rewards to those Avho seek. 

— Selected 



FEBRUARY, 1935 



LETTER FROM CHAIRMAN OF DEPARTMENT 
OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 



Dear Boys and Girls : 

One day a little Chinese girl was brought to Saint 
Mary's School in Shanghai, China, to be entered as 
a pupil. The principal told her father that she could 
not get in because she had bound feet. This terrible 
custom still goes on in China. One way to stop it 
is for Mission Schools not to take girls with bound 
feet. It is very hard for little girls whose feet are 
already bound but it helps many other girls because 
parents want their children to go to Mission Schools. 

This year I would like every Church School in the 
Diocese of East Carolina to have as its aim, at least 
one dollar in every Mite Box. This will help Mis- 
sion Schools in China where they are so much needed 
and our missionaries, wherever they are, to take the 
light of the Gospel into all the dark corners of the 
earth. 

I know that the children of the Diocese of East 
Carolina will do their part. 

Sincerely yours, 

GEORGE S. GRESHAM, 
Chairman, Department Religious Education 
Goldsbora, N. C, February 15, 19'35. 



MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 



The Executive Council of the Diocese met in St. 
James' Parish House, Wilmington, on Tuesday Feb- 
ruary 12, 1935, at 11:00 A. M. 

Those attending were Bishop Darst, Rev. Worth 
Wicker, Rev. Alexander Miller, Rev. E. W. Halleck, 
Rev. George S. Gresham, Rev. C. E. Williams, Rev. 
Walter R. Noe, Mr. W. B. Campbelll, Mr. W. G. Gai- 
ther, Mrs. J. Q. Beckwith and Mi's. Fred Outland. 

The Forward Movement was endorsed and the 
secretary was instructed to notify Bishop Hobson, 
Chairman of the Committee. 

The Bishop stated that the Lord's Acre Plan would 
be presented to the Annual Convention by a special 
speaker. 

The report of the Finance Department was adop- 
ted, as follows : 

Report of Finance Department 

In the opinion of the Department of Finance, the 
Diocese has cause to feel greatly encouraged, not' 
•only because of the splendid efforts of the Parishes 
and Missions during the last month of 1934, which 
enabled us to eome within Three Thousand Dollars 



of balancing our budget, but, also, because of the 
splendid evidence of renewed responsibility for the 
Diocese and General Church work as reflected in 
the result of the Every Member Canvass throughout 
the Diocese. 

In 1934, more parishes and missions paid their full 
quota than at any time in recent years and the report 
of Expectations of parishes and missions for 1935 is 
the largest we have had in some time. Because of 
these facts, the Department for the first time in four 
or five years is able to present a budget which not 
only sets up a necessary reserve, but will provide, 
if Eixpectancies are realized, something for a For- 
ward Movement. 

We recommend the following budget for 1935 : 

Expectancies 1935 

From General 'Church $ 2,775.00 

Investments and specials 4,000.00 

Pence Plan 3,840.00 

Parishes and Missions 33,139.69 

TOTAL $ 43,754.69 

To be appropriated as follows : 

General Church and Provincial 

Synod $ 7,150.00 

Diocesan Administration, General 

and Convention Expense 13,315.00 

Missionary Expense 17,170.00 

Reduction Diocesan Debt 2,600.00 

Margin of Safety 3,200.00 

Contingent Fund 1,319.69 

TOTAL $ 43,754.69 

The Treasurer feels that the income from the Pence 
Plan will be in the neighborhood of $8,000.00 for the 
year 1935, instead of $3,800.00 as outlined in the 
budget. After the application of all receipts from 
the Pence Plan in 1935 upon diocesan debts, if the 
same are sufficient to pay, or exceed the 1935 debt 
curtailments, as shown in the budget, and receipts 
of the Diocese from other sources, are in amounts 
in excess of other budgeted expenditures, the De- 
partment would recommend 

THAT such excess may be used to increase, in 
amounts not exceeding ten per centum, the stipends 
of the missionary clergy and lay workers of the 
diocese, this amount to be payable in December 1935. 

THAT the General Church quota be raised to 
$8,000.00. 

THAT should there be any unappropriated bal- 
ance, this balance to be used for a Forward Move- 
ment in 1936. 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD 



The Forward Mouement 

BY THE RT. REV. HENRY W. HOBSON D. D. 



FORWARD MARCH is 
the command which 
has sounded to the mem- 
bers of the Episcopal 
Church. It is a command 1 
which has ever stirred the 
minds and hearts of loyal 

soldiers who are eager to go into action in behalf of a 
cause which they hold dear. We are called to share 
in a Forward Movement in our Church. That "we" 
includes not only those members of the Episcopal 
Church who are sharing in this broadcast, but all of 
the clergy,, laymen and women, young people, and 
boys and girls, who are included in the two million 
who make up our Church's baptized membership. 

A resohition was adopted by unanimous action of 
the House of Bishops and the House of Deputies at 
the General Convention meeting in October which 
provided for the appointment of a commission of 
five bishops, five presbyters, and ten laymen who 
should "prepare and carry out definite plans in 
collaboration with the National Council, for an or- 
ganized effort to reinvigorate the life of the Church 
and to rehabilitate its general, diocesan and paro- 
chial work." Those appointed as members of this 
commission are fully conscious of the magnitude of 
our commission and of our own inadequacy to meet 
it. Yet we have begun our work with faith and cour- 
age. Our spirit is not the result of any confidence 
in self, but is based first upon the firm conviction 
that it is God's purpose that in our day the Episcopal 
Church, as well as others of the great communion 
of Christendom, shall exert a new pow^r in the life 
of the world; and second upon the knowledge that 
we can depend upon the loyalty and cooperation of 
Ihe bishops, other clergy, and many devoted members 
of the Church. In other words, we have faith in 
God's eagerness to perform the miracle which our 
times demand; and in the readiness of the leaders 
and yjeople of the Episcopal Church to unite in pre- 
paring and carrying out plans for a Forward Move- 
ment. We have no expectation of telling the Church 
what this program must be or how it is to be fulfilled, 
but we know that there are many who stand ready 
to give to the Church their vision, their courage, their 
service, and their faith as we unite in facing the 
present emergency. 

For this is an emergency — and a serious one. 
This call to a Forward Movement, which found ex- 
pression in the resolution of Genei\al Convention, is 



Bishop of Southern Ohio 
A SUMMARY of the purpose of the Forward 
Movement is here presented by the chairman 
of this General Convention Commission. 

This address was broadcast in the Episcopal 
"Church of the Air" series, February 3rd. 



really a cry from the ago- 
nized hearts of those 
who are deeply concerned 
about the fact that our 
Church has not simply 
been standing still, but ac- 
tually in retreat. There is 
no use trying to fool ourselves with any blind opti- 
mism about certain conditions which are amply 
proven by every honest investigation. 

It is not my intention to be a prophet of gloom 
by spending much time painting the dark side of 
our picture. But there are still too many ostriches 
in the Church who refuse to look truth in the face. 
Let us be honest and admit that the work of our 
Church which made steady progress in many parts 
of the world through a century of missionary ad- 
vance, is today crippled for want of adequate sup- 
port. Work which heroes have established through 
years of struggle and sacrifice is threatened and, if 
the present retreat continues, will have to be aban- 
doned. Honesty not only forces us to see what is 
happening in the advance posts of the Church's 
work, but also reveals that the shrinkage of material 
support, Avhich has caused such a financial emer- 
gency, is really a symptom of a far more deep seated 
sickness in the life of the Church. 

Other symptoms are evident when we open our 
eyes. We see, for instance, that the great majority 
of our Church members are woefully ignorant so far 
as any real knowledge of the Christian religion or 
the Church is concerned. They know little about 
the life or teaching of Him whom they have prom- 
ised to follow. They have only the 'haziest under- 
standing of the history or fundamental teachings of 
the Church. They have little or no understanding 
of how Christian principles might be brought to bear 
on the solution of the problems of our day. . . . 

We can see further that considerably less than 
half of our Church members are awake to the fact 
that regular attendance at corporate worship is an 
essential for spiritual well-being. That in spite of 
the fact that many thousands of men, Avomen, and 
young people stand before the altar each year and 
solemnly say "I do" in answer to the question "Do 
you promise to follow Jesus Christ as your Lord 
and Saviour?" they also slip away by the thousands 
and join the "lost communicant" army of slackers. 

We must admit also that the Church has not been 
successful in the enlistment of the youth of our day. 



FEBRUARY, 1935 



11 



They deserve a program which will arouse their en- 
thusiasm and offer them a way of life appealing to 
their spirit of adventure and their readiness to make 
heroic sacrifice in a great cause. 

While admitting that frequently the Church re- 
ceives no credit for what it has done and is doing, 
we must face the fact that the Church is not exert- 
ing any very great influence on social, economic, po- 
litical; national, or international life today. It was 
said of the first disciples when they came to Thessa- 
lonica: "These that have turned the world upside 
down are come hither also." Millions of those who 
call themselves disciples today are not doing much 
to turn upside down those conditions and situations 
in modern life which are contrary to the Gospel as 
taught and I'evealed by Jesus. We have compro- 
mised again and again and again until the average 
Church member is a complacent individual who has 
pretty well accepted the standards of the world. 
You look at him and see no difference between him 
and a person without Church affiliation, and as a 
rule it is a surprising thought to him that he ought 
to be different. 

THESE, and other symptoms, can all be traced 
back to one fundamental sickness in the Church— - 
a failure on the part of the majority of our members 
to live up to the demands of discipleship. Jesus of 
Nazareth called certain men to be His followers. He 
made great demands of them. He had no use for 
them unless they were ready to meet these demands. 
That same Jesus — the living Christ — calls us today 
to be His followers. He is making just as great 
demands of us as He made of those first disciples. 
He has no use for us unless we are ready to meet 
these demands. And the Church is in retreat be- 
cause in its ranks are a vast number of people who 
call themselves followers of the Master who have 
never faced the question of what it means to be a fol- 
lower of Jesus, or have found the demands too 
strenuous and have thought it possible to water 
them down and still hold their places in the ranks 
of the disciples of Christ. It couldn't be done nine- 
teen hundred years ago and it cannot be done now. 
The Church will stop its retreat and begin an ad- 
vance when its members seriously face the demands 
which Christ makes of them and become His loyal 
disciples. 

What does the Forward Movement expect to do 
in this situation? In answering this question it 
should first of all be made clear that the Forward 
Movement is not to be a whirlwind campaign to raise 
money. God knows how great the need is for more 
adequate support of the Church 's work. The tragic 
condition in many parishes and dioceses as well as 
in the mission fields, cries out, "Help or we perish !" 



In the very near future, more money must be given 
to the Church or irreparable harm will be done to 
its work. It must not be said that the Forward 
Movement is a "spiritual" effort not concerned with 
the problem of finance. Such a statement assumes 
a dualism which is a lie. Vital spiritual life ex- 
presses itself in an eagerness to give of all that we 
have, money included, for the fulfilment of Christ's 
demand that His Gospel be made known to all the 
world. Therefore, the Forward Movement must 
have as part of its objective the development of a 
truer sense of responsibility on the part of every 
member of the Church for the support of the whole 
program of the Church. 

However, the financial emergency must not blind 
its to the fact that no adequate solution of our prob- 
lems will come from the mere use of campaign meth- 
ods to raise money. It might be possible, through a 
well organized approach, to extract a million or 
more additional dollars from the pockets of Church 
members during the coming year, but unless those 
who give are changed in spirit the relief would be 
but temporary, and financial stringency would soon 
set in again. The Forward Movement therefore 
must go deeper, and intends to go deeper. It will 
present a long time program of education and en- 
listment. 

THE EDUCATIONAL PHASE of the program in- 
cludes first of all a thorough study and understand- 
ing of the present needs and opportunities of the 
Church. To this end members of the commission 
have been going throughout the Church holding con- 
ferences with bishops and other leaders, meeting 
with clergy and lay people, and seeking in every pos- 
sible way to gather the true picture of the present 
situation. The primary purpose of these confer- 
ences is not to enlist the support of those to whom 
we have gone, for we are confident that their back- 
ing is already assured. We have gone to them be- 
cause we depend so fully upon their counsel, and 
realize That the Forward Movement program must 
be built not by us, but out of the minds and hearts 
of many who are so richly equipped to lead in this 
venture. Tlu-se visits have given us both a unique 
opportunity to gather suggestions for our program, 
and the privilege of entering into a closer fellowship 
with many loyal members throughout the Church 
who are ready to share in the advance which must 
be made. 

Second, the educational program will present to 
the Church, through every possible channel, vivid 
and arousing information pertaining to the needs 
and opportunities which confront us. The commis- 
sion is convinced that an ignorant Church is always 
a retreating Church, and that an informed member- 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD 



ship must be one of the first steps in any advance. 

The enlistment program makes no new appeal. It 
is not concerned with the organization of any special 
groups. It will not use any unique formula. It 
presents a call which is as old as the Gospel itself — 
the same call which Jesus gave to Peter and James 
and John — "Follow Me." It will issue this call 
not through a new organization but through the 
Church as already organized. The goal is the en- 
listment of men and women, young people, boys and 
girls, in a program which will demand of them that 
they live as true disciples of Christ and loyal mem- 
bers of His Church. In other words, they shall do 
the essential things which our Lord and the Church 
has always demanded of those who dare to call them- 
selves Christians. 

WHAT are some of these things? 

First of all, there must be an honest recognition 
of our individual failures, and of the fact that be- 
cause we have failed this retreat of which I have 
spoken has set in. We must face our frequent lapses, 
our disloyalty, our hypocrisy, and have a sincere 
feeling of sorrow for our past neglect. It is the 
first and necessary step of repentance — an about 
face. The disciple must turn — turn from his present 
state to God. Turn not once, but as he begins each 
day, and again and again during the day, as some 
temptation would lead him astray, or some selfish- 
ness would cause him to wander. A Forward Move- 
ment requires that men today shall face anew the 
demands of John the Baptist. 

Second, we members of the Church, or those who 
would become members, must make a definite de- 
cision that our pledge to follow Christ" shall be the 
supreme end and purpose of our lives. Half-way 
following must cease; compromise must end; spas- 
modic loyalty must go. The disciple must realize 
that to take the Master's way means to follow Him 
in all things; to be ready to have Him order and 
control every area of his life. For He asks us, as 
He asked James and John, "Can ye drink of the cup 
that I drink of?" The disciple who does not fol- 
low is a deserter. 

The third step essential to a Forward Movement is 
one which I have touched on already — the develop- 
ment of an informed and intelligent Church member- 
ship. It is fairly easy to stir up enthusiasm by the 
use of various well-known" methods, but we mus+ 
keep constantly in mind that enthusiasm which has 
no foundation in knowledge is a dangerous state. 
The disciple must learn — learn about Christ, His 
life, His teachings; learn about the Church, its his- 
tory and its work ; learn about his fellows, their 
problems, their suffering and their rights; lenrr> 
about the world, and how the relations of races and 



nations can advance or impede the fulfilment of 
God's purpose. The Church has been trying to edu- 
cate its members, but we have done a poor job of it. 
We must face the task anew and through special 
literature, the Church press, classes, conferences, 
sermons, addresses, individual study, seek to shed 
an ever fuller light to dispel the darkness of our 
minds. 

Fourth, we must learn to pray. I dare not start 
on this subject in this address except to say that we 
have done much talking about the importance of 
prayer but have taught very few how to pray. It is 
a hard but essential task. Without prayer the indi- 
vidual and the Church are helpless. When the first 
disciples saw the results of prayer in the Master's 
life, they asked "Teach us to pray." He had a 
hard time doing it, but at last when they had learned 
the secret they received the power of the Holy Spirit. 
It is this power that the Church needs today, and 
it will come only as its members learn to pray. 

The fifth requirement which the Forward Move- 
ment presents as essential for the disciple can be 
well expressed in Jesus' words to His followers : "He 
who would be first among you shall be servant of 
all." The Christian must make service the motive 
of all life. The Davenport Pastoral of the House of 
Bishops called us to place the service motive in busi- 
ness and industry ahead of the profit motive. I have 
heard people say "That is just foolish idealism." 
Not unless Christ was a fool. He rejected the idea 
of broken up compartments. Life was all one to 
Him. When He demanded that His followers be ser- 
vants of all, He meant all. It must be made clear 
today that we cannot be Christians unless our first 
motive is service — service in the Church; service in 
our communities; service in professional life, in 
business and industry; service in politics; service 
in nation and the world. The disciple must learn to 
serve— yes, to be servant of ALL. 

A sixth point in our program for Discipleship must 
be the reestablishment of regular corporate worship 
as an essential for those who count themselves mem- 
bers of the Church. I have already spoken of the 
neglect which surrounds us. It is not going to be 
easy to overcome this habit of neglect, but overcome 
it we can. The Church always moved forward when 
there Avas present in the hearts of its members a love 
for God which made them eager to join each other 
in the corporate acts of praise, thanksgiving, prayer, 
and fellowship combined in common worship. 

Seventh, it must be made clear that there is a vast 
difference between the giving that most Church 
members indulge in and the sharing that Christ 
demands of His disciples. Most of us have given o<-' 
our left-overs while 'the Master calls its to share our 



FEBRUARY, 1935 



13 



all. It Avill hurt. It hurt Him. It will cost. It 
cost Him His life. Only as we learn to share our time, 
our money, our minds, our strength, our love, shall 
we open our lives so that God's power can flow 
through us to bring about a Forward Movement in 
the life of the Church. 

You may say that these several phases of the en- 
listment program are just vague ideals. Ideals, yes, 
but the Forward Movement must see to it that the 
demands of Discipleship are no longer vague. They 
must be presented without compromise or watering 
down. We must not be afraid of making great de- 
mands. Christ called men to an adventurous life 
of daring in which misunderstanding, persecution, 
sacrifice; and even death took their toll. It is time 
that the Church called in the same spirit. It means 
we are launched on a long-time program to convert 
and enlist, to educate the clergy and people of our 
Church. Among the first definite steps in this pro- 
gram is the publication of a Lenten pamphlet on 
Discipleship which will be distributed throughout 
the Church. Already 400,000 copies of these pamph- 
lets have been ordered and it is hoped that the great 
majority of the individuals and the families in the 
Church will make use of it for daily Bible reading 
and prayer during Lent. They will probably be 
distributed in your parish. When you receive your 
copy I ask that you use it faithfully. I also ask 
that you pray for the Forward Movement, and that 
you take your full part in the fulfillment of its pro- 

■:im. You^are not asked to do something new or 
different, but to do better the very things that we 
as Christians have already promised to do. We ar 
called to take our religion just as seriously as the 
first disciples took the religion which Christ called 
on them to accept. He proclaimed a Gospel not as 
something we can take or leave — or something we 
can dabble with — but as an essential for every one 
of us. And being an essential for us, it is essential 
for all men, and we must give it to others. Thai 
missionary spirit is the very life blood of the Gospel 
and unless we share in that spirit we arc not fol- 
lowers of the Master. 

Jesus says to us again today: "Ho who would 
come after Me let him deny himself and take up his 
cross daily, and follow Me." He calls us to be His 
companions and to travel His way — an adventurous 
way counting no cost too heavy and no sacrifice 
too great. 

Thank God for those who through the centuries 
of the Church's life have dared to answer His call 
and for the many loyal followers of the Master wh" 
are members of the Church today. It is because we 
know that there are many who are daily following 
the way of Christ that we dare to go forth on this 



venture. We are certain that the spirit which is 
in them can become contagious ; that what 'we see 
in them can be caught by others; that through the 
loyalty and devotion of faithful Christians through- 
out the Church a new spirit can be fanned into flame 
and pass from man to man, from parish to parish, 
from diocese to diocese, until the Church is united in 
a victorious body which will march forward as dis- 
ciples of Christ proclaiming to a struggling, yearn- 
ing, suffering world the healing power of His Gospel. 

—The Living Church 



NOTES FROM FRIENDLY HALL 




January found us all back at college after the 
Christmas vacation, and as we gathered about the 
fire at Friendly Hall we had many interesting ex- 
periences to exchange. We are so happy to welcome 
back Nora Stephenson who had to drop out of college 
early last fall on account of illness ; we feel sure she 
is goin to be a helpful member of our group. This 
month we have had a visit from Florence Eagles, one 
of the most active members of our Auxiliary last 
year, who still seems to be keenly interested in what 
we are doing at Friendly Hall. Florence could tell 
us what it is like to be teaching for the first time, 
and we are "all ears" because next year some of us 
will probably be having similar experiences. 

At the regular montly meeting of our Auxiliary, 
held on the 7th, our rector installed the newly elected 
officers with a most impressive service. Following 
this, we had the privilege of hearing an address by 
the Reverend David Yates, of Tarboro, who presented 
very interestingly the objectives for the life of the 
Woman's Auxiliary For this triennium. Mr. Yates 
presented us with copies of the five addresses made 
at the sessions of the Auxiliary in Atlantic City; w 
are much pleased to have these for reference and 
reading at Friendly Hall. 

The mid-monthly meeting of our Executive Coun- 
cil (composed of the officers of our Auxiliary) proved 
to be rather stimulating as we had some lively dis- 
cussions before arriving at conclusions. Afterwards 
our adviser, Miss Bowon. joined us and expressed he^ 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD 



approval of the really workable plans we had to 
present to the whole group at our February meeting. 

Our study of the Teachings and History of the 
Church, under the leadership of Mrs. Wicker, is prov- 
ing more and more interesting each Sunday, and the 
attendance is steadily increasing. 

With the new year came a pleasing innovation at 
Friendly Hall — every Saturday evening some of the 
young women of the parish are there, offering us 
various forms of entertainment and supplementing 
our routine "bag supper" with delicious home-made 
sandwiches, cake. etc. Much to our delight, Mr. and 
Mrs. Wicker are also with us quite often now, and 
on a recent Saturday they gave us a great and glo- 
rious surprise by bringing a freezer of ice cream with 
which to "top off" supper. We are appreciative of 
so much interest on the part of our friends of St 
Paul's parish. 

MARY TARRY, 
Chairman of Publicity, 
Student Branch Woman's Auxiliary 



ST. PAUL'S WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 
GREENVILLE. 



The personnel of our official group for 1935 re- 
mains unchanged with one exception — a tribute to 
the efficiency of their work and the esteem and con- 
fidence in which they are held by their co-workers. 
At the request of Mrs. Frank Wooten. our Education- 
al Chairman, Mrs Bonner who formerly held this 
position and who has recently returned to the parish 
after a year's absence was reinstated. Mrs. Wooten 
has kindly consented to serve with Mrs. Bonner. 

In January a large and interested group met in the 
Parish House for the first business meeting of the 
new year. Mrs. Richard Wiliams our beloved new- 
old president in a gracious speech of acceptance, said 
that she wished to emphasize more earnestly than 
ever the aim of the Auxiliary to strengthen the siprit 
and aspect of our work. She appealed with great 
earnestness to each individual member to face with 
hope and courage the responsibilities and opportuni- 
ties of the New Year and prayerfidly to seek Cod's 
guidance in her attempt to meet them and use them 
to further His work. 

The Treasurer's report for nineteen hundred and 
thirty-four was most gratifying showing as it did 
that our Auxiliary had paid all of its apportionments 
and met all of its obligations leaving us with a bal- 
ance to our credit. 

The reports from the chairmen of the varioiis de- 
partments showed how faithfully each had endeavor- 
ed to do her work. 
• At the close of the business session a very beautifu 1 



service of installation was conducted by our rector, 
Mr. Wicker. As we promised to serve in the differ- 
ent offices to which we were elected or appointed we 
felt keenly conscious of our solemn duty to give time 
and thought to the tasks assigned us. 

Our devotional meeting was held on January 
twenty-second. The program, "Missionary Facts 
from the Church's Foreign and Domestic Fields" in 
which a number of members took part, proved very 
interesting as items of news from China, Japan, the 
Phillipine Islands, Mexico, Alaska and from the rural 
and isolated districts of our own country were re- 
lated, we realized more fully than ever before the 
extent and character of the work being caried out 
by our beloved Church. This meeting, too, was well 
attended. We hope that programs of this kind will 
inspire us to redouble our efforts in behalf of mis- 
sions so that no one of the loyal, consecrated men and 
women who has heeded the Master's call, "Go ye in- 
to all the world and preach my gospel" will be de- 
nied the privilege of obeying because of our failure 
to help provide the necessary means. 

NELLIE BOND ASKEW 



CONFERENCE ON FORWARD MOVEMENT 



Mr. Lewis C. Williams of Richmond, Virginia, a 
member of the Forward Movement Commission, cre- 
ated at the last Ceneral Convention, held a con- 
ference with Bishop Darst in Wilmington on Febru- 
ary 21st. Plans wero made at that time for present- 
ing the Movement in East Carolina. 



INTERIOR OF OLDEST CHURCH IN NORTH 

CAROLINA IS BEING RESTORED BY 

COMMITTEE 



Raleigh, N. C. — The committee on the preservation 
of the oldest church in North Carolina, St. Thomas', 
Bath, met in Ralei»h January 21st. In recent years 
this committee has been very active, and the fabric 
of the old church is now in excellent condition. 
Further funds have recently been received, and now 
steps are to be taken to restore the interior, especial- 
ly the chancel, to approximately, what it was in co- 
lonial days. . 



The men whom I have seen succeed best in life 
have always been cheerful and hopeful men. who 
went about their business with a smile on their faces, 
and took the changes and chances of this mortal life 
like men, facing rough and smooth alike as it camre. 

— Charles Kinaslev. 



FEBRUARY, 1935 



15 



(Continued from Page 2) 
ing their Corporate Communion at the early morning- 
service, it was found difficult for members to attend, 
return home and then be on time for Church School. 
The new innovation is for the league to hold their 
Communion, and then join in a breakfast served in 
the Parish House by ladies of the parish. 

The idea is an excellent one, blending the League 
Ideals of Worship and Fellowship. 

First Sunday in Epiphany Observed as Personal 
Evangelism Sunday 

Throughout the Province of Sewanee, the First 
Sunday in Epiphany was observed by leaguers as 
Personal Evangelism Sunday. 

Billy Da'niels, provincial chairman of personal 
evangelism, designed a program for the Sunday, 
which was distributed by the various diocesan chair- 
men. 

Containing questions formulated for discussion on 



the subject of the nature and importance of personal 
evangelism, the program was found interesting and 
helpful, according to impressions expressed by 
leaguers. 

Further work along this line will be continued 
from time to time throughout the year. 

Billie Tillinghast, Fayetteville, is diocesan chair- 
man of personal evangelism, and leagues are urged 
to communicate with her for aid along this line. 
Rev. Malcolm S. Taylor Holds Meet on 
Evangelism in Wilmington 

Rev. Malcolm S. Taylor, director of the National 
Commission of Evangelism, meeting with members of 
the vyilmington leagues, recently discussed a pro- 
gram to be undertaken in this diocese in the near 
future. 

The meeting was held in the Great Hall of St. 
James' Parish House following a delightful 'silver 
tea'. 



STATEMENT OF THE AMOUNTS PAID BY THE PARISHES AVD MISSIO>S FOR DIOCESAN WD GENERAL 

CHURCH WORK, JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1935. 



Parishes 

Beaufort, St. Paul's 

Clinton, St. Paul's 

Fayetteville, St. John's 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 

Hope Mills, Christ Church 

Kinston, St. Mary's 

New Bern, Christ Church 

Red Springs, St. Stephen's ...... 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' 

Southport, St. Philip's 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd . . 

Wilmington, St. James' 

Wilmington St. John's 

Wilmington, St. Paul's 



Organized Missions. 



Burgaw, St. Mary's . 
Faison, St. Gabriel's 
Lumberton, Trinity . 



Parishes 

Aurora, Holy Cross 

Ayden, St. James' 

Bath, St. Thomas' 

Belha-ven, St. James' 

Bonnerton, St. John's 

Chocowimty. Trinity 

Columbia, St. Andrew's 

Creswell, St. David' Q 

Edenton, St. Paul's 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church 

Farmville, Emmanuel 

Gatesville, St. Mary's ........ 

Greenville,. St. Paul's 

Grifton, St. John's 

Hamilton, St. Martin's 

Hertford, Holy Trinity ...... 

Jessama, Zion 

Lake Landing, St. George's .. 
Plymouth, Grace Church 

Roper, St. Luke's 

Washington, St Peter's 

Williaimston, Advent 

Windsor, St Thomas' 



CONVOCATION OF WILMINGTON. 



Expec- 


Paid to 


tations. 


Feb. 19th 


f 365.20 


$ 29.45 


50.00 




2,150.00 




1 000.00 




60.00 




1,000.00 


100.00 


2,125.00 


85.14 


55.00 




200.00 




169.60 




371.40 




9.781.50 


677.51 


2,031.60 


112.45 


1,200.00 




35.00 


3.20 


65.00 




174.00 




250.00 




300.00 




35.00 




350.00 




100 00 


4.15 


100.00 




442.40 




700.15 




1,559 80 


200.00 


1,008.76 


38.23 


238.20 


25.00 


128.00 




1.356 20 


167.90 


200.00 




05.00 




400.00 




100.00 




200.00 




200.00 




75.00 


12.40 


1,500.00 


146.93 


ion. oo 


25.0H 


225.00 





North West, All Soul's. . . . 
Pikeville. St. George's . . . 
Trenton, Grace Church . . . 

Vanceboro, St. Paul's 

Whiteville, Grace Church . , 
Wrightsville, St. Andrews 

Unorganized Missions. 



Jasper, St. Thomas' 

Pollocksville, Mission 

Wilmington, Delgado Mission 



Parochial Missions. 

Campbellton. St. Philip's . . 
Tolar-Hart, Good Shepherd 



Total 



OF EDENTON 



Winton. St. John's 

Woodviile, Grace Church 

Organized Missions 



Ahoskie. St. Thomas' 

Fairfield. All Saints' 

Murfreesboro, St. Barnabas' 

Roxobel. St. Mark's 

Sladesviile, St. John's 
Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' . . 
Sunbury. St. Peter's ...... 

Swan Quarter, Calvary . . . . 

Vinterville, St. Luke's . . . . 

Yeatesville, St. Matthew's 

Unorganized Missions. 



Avoca, Holy Innocents' 
Camden, St. Joseph's . . 



Pnri.shes 

Favetteville, St. Joseph's 
New Bern, St. Cyprian's . . 
Wilmington, St. Mark's .. 

Organized Missions 



Belhaven. St. Mary's 

Edenton, St. John-Evangelist 
Elizabeth City, St. Phi'ip's .. 

Goldsboro. St. Andrew's 

Kinston, St. Augustine's 
Washington, St.. Paul's 



CONVOCATION OF COLORED CHURCH WORKERS 



Unorganized Missions. 
a urora, St. Jude's 

Beaufort. St. Clement's 

Greenville, St. Andrew's 

Haddock's Cros? Roads, St. Stephen's 

P'Tfr St. Ann's 

Wilmington, "Brooklyn" Mission... 
Wrightsville, St. Augustine's 



104.00 


420 00 


140.00 


175 00 


mi.no 


20.15 


60.00 


75.00 


195.00 



Total 

Grand Total 



Expec- 


Paid 


tations 


to Feb 19 


io. on 


1.01 


20.00 




15 00 




30.00 




100.00 




6.00 






i i 


20.00 




20.00 




10.00 




25.00 


•i 


70.00 




21,159.30 


$ 1,00S,76 



Total $ 10,477.59 



100.00 




150.00 


i 


55.no 


i 


10.00 




30.00 




92.08 




10.00 




100. on 




42.no 


11.71 


20.00 




125.00 


20.00 


20.00 




so. no 




10.00 




% 10,477.59 


$ 651.32 



79.00 

40.no 

30.00 
30.00 
56.00 
20.00 
20.00 



% 1,565.15 $ 



2.00 



2. Oft 



$ 33,202.04 $ 1,662.08 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD 









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BUILDING A LIFE 





You often hear it said — ''A man must 
make a living." Perhaps — but building 
a life comes ahead of making a Hying. 

These are the principles Jesus set forth as 
those on which to build a life. Many of 
the world's greatest men could have been 
fabulously rich if they had devoted them- 
selves to accumulating material wealth, — 
bui instead, they preferred to build a life 
that stands immortal. On which of these 
are you spending most of your time? 

—The Witness 



MARCH, 1935 







THE MISSION HERALD 



MEETING OF THE BOARD OF MANAGERS OF 
THOMPSON ORPHANAGE 



The 48th Annual Meeting of the Board of Mana- 
gers of the Thompson Orphanage, was held at the 
Orphanage, Tuesday, February 19th, with the fol- 
lowing members present : 

From the Diocese of North Carolina — The Rt. Rev. 
Edwin A. Penick, D. D., Rev. Robert Bruce Owens, 
Rev. Milton A. Barber, S. T. D., Mr. Fred W. Glover, 
Mr. Erwin A. Holt, Mr. Francis J. Murdoch, Mrs. 
Ashby Lee Baker. 

From the Diocese of East Carolina — Rt. Rev. Thos. 
Darst, D. D., Rev. E. W. Halleck. 

From the Diocese of Western North Carolina — Rt. 
Rev. Robert E. Gribbin, D. D., Rev. Samuel B. Stroup, 
Mr. William L. Balthis. 

From the Executive Committee — Mr. J. Q. Beck- 
! with, Mr. Francis 0. Clarkson, Dr. W. Myers Hunter. 
!;Rev. John L. Jackson, Rev. Willis G. Clark, Mrs. 
\ Sam Maxwell. 

Reports were given by the Superintendent and 
; Treasurer, the treasurer of the Endowment Fund, 
3 Mr. Francis 0. Clarkson; the treasurer of the Build- 
ing Fund. Rev. John L Jackson; the Orphanage Phy- 
. sician, Dr. Myers Hunter; the chairman of the Build- 
ing and Grounds Committee, the Rev. R, B. Owens ; 
the chairman of the committee on the Admission of 
Children, the Rev. John L. Jackson; the chairman of 
the committee on Dismissals. Rev. Willis G. Clark; 
: and the Budget for 1935 as prepared by the Finance 
Committee was passed. The following Memorial 
Resolution for 'the Ven. William H. Hardin, prepared 
i and presented by Rev. Robert B. Owens was adopted : 
Whereas ; since the last meeting of the Board of 
Managers of the Thompson Orphanage, our friend 
and fellow member, William Hill Hardin, Priest, has 
been called into the rest of the Paradise of God, now 
be it resolved; 

1. That we wish to place on record our deep ap- 
preciation of the long and faithful services rendered 
by him to this Institution. As a member, and Secre- 
tary, for many years of the Board of Managers, the 
Institution its staff, and its children were dear to 
his heart; and his time, his interest and his best 
thought were always at their service. 

2. That while we shall miss his gen : al person- 
ality and his wise counsels in our deliberations, 
yet we bow in humble submission to the wise Provi- 
dence that has called him from our midst, confident 
in the faith that all things work together for good. 

3. That we extend to his beloved wife and familv 
our sincerest sympathy in their loss, which is our 
loss also, and remiv 1 them of the goodness of God 



who has told us that "He shall wipe away all tears 
from their eyes." 

4. That a copy of these resolutions be spread 
upon our Minutes and a copy sent to the family of 
our friend and brother. 

Mr. William H. Williamson, Jr. and Mrs. Owen 
Fitzsimons were elected to membership in the Execu- 
tive Committee. 

Mr. Francis J. Murdoch was elected Secretary to 
the Board of Managers. The Rev. Milton A. Barber, 
S. T. D. and Mr. J. Porter Stedman were elected to 
present the Report of the Board of Managers to the 
Convention of the Diocese of East Carolina. 

Bishop Darst announced a bequest of $1,000 from 
Mrs. Julia K. Woolvin, contingent upon settlement 
of the estate and suggested that it be used as a 
Student Loan Fund. 

Mr. Ba'lthis moved that Bishop Darst 's suggestion 
be accepted with appreciation, and that this Fund 
be set up as the "Julia K. Woolvin Memorial Fund" 
the income to be used at the discretion of the Execu- 
tive Committee. 

Bishop Gribbin moved that the heirs, Sam Wool- 
vin and Mrs. Charles Broun be sent a letter of appre- 
ciation from the Board of Managers. 



ON THE WITNESS STAND 



"What Think Ye Of Christ?" 



Pilate: "I find no fault in him at all." 

Judas: "I have sinned in that I have betrayed 

innocent blood." 

Simeon : " A light to lighten the Gentiles." 
Centurian : "Truly this was the Son of God." 
Police: "Never man spake like this man." 
Demons: "Thou art the Holy One of God." 
John the Baptist: "Behold the Lamb of God that 

taketh away the sin of the world." 

John : "Ho is the bright and morning star." 
Peter: "Thou art the Christ, the Son of the living 

God." 

Thomas: "My Lord and my God." 

Paul: "T count all things loss for the excellency 

of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord." 

Angels : Unto you is born a Saviour which is Christ 

the Lord." 

God in Heaven : This is my beloved Son in whom 

I am well pleased." 

— Selected 
The only thing- that matters is the Gospel of Christ, 

that those who have it shall live it, and those who 

have it not, shall receive it. 

— Archbishop of York. 



The Mission Herald 



VOLUME XLIX 



WILMINGTON, N. C., MARCH, 1935 



NUMBER 3 



BISHOP'S LETTER 



On Sunday, February the tenth at 11 A. M. I 
preached to a large congregation in St. Mary's 
Church, Burgaw. 

On the afternoon of the same day I preached in 
All Souls', North West, where I was greeted by. a 
large number of people of that community, also by 
a goodly company of our friends and members from 
Grace Church, Whiteville, including the new rector, 
Rev. A. H. Marshall and the excellent Junior Choir 
from Grace Church. 

On Tuesday, the twelfth, I presided at a hopeful 
and encouraging meeting of the Diocesan Executive 
Council in St. James ' Parish House, Wilmington. 

On Sunday, the seventeenth I preached in St. 
Thomas' Church, Atkinson, at 11 A. M.. 

On Tuesday, the nineteenth I attended a meeting 
of the Board of Managers of the Thompson Orphan- 
age in Charlotte. 

On Sunday, the twenty-fourth at 11 A. M., I 
preached and celebrated Holy Communion in St. 
Barnabas' Church. Snow Hill. 

On the evening of the same day I preached and 
confirmed one person in Emmanuel Church, Farm- 
ville. 

On February the twenty-eighth and March the 
first, I attended a Regional Conference of the Nation- 
al Field Department in Charlotte. Other represen- 
tatives present from East Carolina were Rev. W. R. 
Noe, Rev. Alexander Miller and Mr. John R. T'olar. 

On Sunday, March the third at 11 A. M. I preached 
and celebrated Holy Communion in the Church of 
the Holy Cross, Aurora. 

In the afternoon, I preached and confirmed one 
person presented by the Rev. W. H. R, Jackson in 
St. John's Church, Bonnerton. 

At night I preached and confirmed seven persons, 
presented by the Rev. J. B. Brown, in St. Jude's 
Church, Aurora. 

On Monday, the fourth at 11 A. M. in St, Andrew's 
€hurch, Columbia, T ordained the Rev. John W. 
Hardy to the priesthood and celebrated Holy Com- 
munion. 

The sermon was preached by he Rev. Charles E. 
Williams. 

On Tuesday, the fifth, at 10 A. M. in the Church 
of the Good Shepherd, Wilmington, I ordained the 
Rev. Edward C. McConnell to the priesthood and 
celebrated Holy Communion. 

The sermon was preached by the Rev. Wm. 1L 
Milton D. I). 



On Sunday, the tenth at 11 A. M. I preached, 
confirmed three persons presented by the Rev. L. 
M. Fenwick and celebrated Holy Communion in St. 
Paul's Church, Beaufort. 

In the afternoon, I preached and confirmed three 
persons presented by Mr. Fenwick in St Clement's 
Church, Beaufort. 

On Tuesday night, the twelfth, I preached at a 
Special Lenten Service in Christ Church, Mt. Pleas- 
ant, S. C. 

On Wednesday night, the thirteenth I preached at 
the Lenten Community Service in Grace Church, 
Charleston, S. C. 

On the night of Sunday, the seventeenth, I 
preached in Grace Church, New York. 

From Monday the eighteenth through Friday the 
twenty-second, I preached at the Lenten Noon-day 
Service in St. Bartholomew's Church, New York. 
While in New York I also had the privilege of speak- 
ing to the students of the General Theological Semi- 
nary and of preaching at a special Lenten Service 
in the Cathedral of the Incarnation, Garden City, 
Long Island. 

On Sunday, the twenty-fourth, at 8 A. M. in St. 
Paul's Church, Wilmington, I confirmed three per- 
sons presented by the Rev. Alexander Miller, and 
at 11 A. M. in the same Church, I preached and con- 
firmed eight persons, pi^esented by Mr. Miller. 

On the evening of the twenty-fourth I preached, 
and confirmed ten persons presented by the Rev. 
E. W. Halleck in St. John's Church, Wilmington. 

With the earnest hope that we may learn with joy, 
the meaning and power of Discipleship during this 
blessed Lenten Season, I am 

Faithfully and affectionately, 

Your Friend and Bishop 
THOMAS C. DARST 



BISHOP'S PENCE PLAN TAKING ON PERMA- 
NENT ASPECT IN CHICAGO 



Chicago — The Bishop's Pence Plan is taking on 
a permanent aspect with the announcement that the 
Order of Episcopal Pencemen of the Diocese of Chi- 
cago was effected at a meeting >of the group on 
March 9th. " For some,. time an order embracing pa- 
roHiial renresentativ^' of the pence plan has been 
under considerations It is expected that the charter 
members in th-e diocese 'will number nearly 500. 

The Pence Plan in the diocese has brought in 
approximately $37,000. 

— Living Church 



THE MISSION HERALD 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT TO BOARD 
OF MANAGERS— 1934 



I wish to welcome you all to this 48th Annual 
Meeting. To our new members, the Rev. Milton A. 
Barber, S. T. D., Mr. Erwin A. Holt, and Mr. Fran- 
cis J. Murdoch, from the Diocese of North Carolina, 
and the Rev. Worth Wicker from the Diocese of 
East Carolina, on behalf of the Board of Managers, 
I extend most cordial greetings and invite you to 
have fellowship with us in the greatest of all tasks, 
and the happiest of all privileges, namely that of 
giving a chance to some underprivileged children 
to find a home and education and loving sympathy, 
and to help upbuild lives that shall be useful and 
worth while. 

We are most happy, also, to welcome here today, 
as an honorary member with full rights and privi- 
leges, one who has a long and distinguished record of 
personal service for the Orphanage, and who has 
bestowed upon it many generous gifts, our good 
friend, Mrs. S. Westray Battle. 

It is a pleasure to have so many members of the 
Executive Committee with us in joint session. We 
owe much of whatever success has been achieved 
in the conduct of the Institution during these many 
years, to their faithful attendance and wise coun- 
seling. 

We further wish to extend our heartiest congratu- 
lations to Bishop Darst on his twenty years of illus- 
trious service as Bishop of the Diocese of East 
Carolina. 

Since the last meeting of the Board of Managers. 
the Ven. Win. H. Hardin, FOR TWENTY-FIVE 
YEARS the faithful and efficient secretary, has been 
called to his reward. He was truly. Cod's faithful 
soldier and servant unto his life's end. Great in 
1ho simplicity of his life and in his whole hearted 
consecration to his Lord and Master. Pie will be 
sorely missed in the counsels and deliberations of 
this body to which he gave the full measure of his 
love and devotion. His genial personality and warm 
friendliness drew all men unto him, and the children 
of this home felt a real affection for him. We have 
lost a cherished co-worker, but we know that some- 
where in the Great Beyond, he is bidding us "close 
up the ranks and go forward." 

During- the past year 121 children have been cared 
for, 66 girls and 55 boys. 93 spent the full year or 
33,945 days. 28 spent 4.399 days making a total 
number of davs of care 38 344. Total number of 
meals served 115.032. 14 children were placed: 9 
with relatives. 1 in I T . S. Navy, 1 in Hosiery Mill. 1 



in Samarcand, 1 in a private home, 1 in Hospital 
Training Class. 

14 children were admitted, 11 girls and 3 boys. 
The present number of children is 107; 61 girls and 
46 boys. 23 are Full Orphans, 69 are Half Orphans ; 
15 have both parents living. 72 are from the Diocese 
of North Carolina, 24 from the Diocese of East Caro- 
lina and 11 from the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina. 

In June Mrs. M. L. Wooldridge, Dean of Workers 
at the Thompson Orphanage, resigned her position as 
matron of Walter J. Smith Cottage, because of ad- 
vancing years, and has gone to live with her sister 
in Richmond, Va. Miss Jane Darwin, who has 
taught several years at Valle Crusis School has been 
in charge of this cottage since Mrs. Wooldridge left 
and has been filling the position very acceptably. 

In midsummer, Miss Lucretia Wilson, for nearly 
nine years matron of the Osborne Cottage, was mar- 
ried and relinquished her position. 

Miss Annie Deal, a former Orphanage girl and a 
graduate of St. Peter's Training School for Nurses, 
with the assistance of Miss Sadie Reeder, has been 
capably caring for the younger children in this 
cottage. 

Our Kindergartner, Miss Elsie Nail was very id 
during the summer and was advised by her phy- 
sician to rest for several months. The Executive 
Committee very kindly granted her a years' leave 
of absence. 

We were fortunate in being able to secure from 
the Oxford Orphanage, a Kindergartner, highly 
recommended by Mr. Proctor the Superintendent, 
Miss Helen Cood, who has ably carried on the Kin- 
dergarten and school contact work and the study 
hall. 

To all the members of the staff I am sincerely 
grateful for their faithful and conscientious dis- 
charge of the duties assigned to them. Their loyal 
and whole hearted cooperation has greatly lightened 
the burden of responsibiliy resting upon the Execu- 
tive heads. 

Our school attendance is divided among several 
schools as follows: Central High School, 17; Tech- 
nical High School, 2; Piedmont Junior High School, 
31 ; Elizabeth School. 40; First Ward School. 8; Kin- 
dergarten, 7. 

Possibly 4 boys and 4 girls will graduate from 
High School this May. Three of these have been 
honor students and all have made above the average 
grades. One of the boys is Chief Marshall and 
President of the Dramatic Club. The children enter 
into all the school activities both athletic and social, 
and a number of them have been benefitted by the 



MARCH, 1935 



splendid musical training given by Mr. It R. Sides. 

Most of those graduating would benefit by college 
education, but our Student Loan Fund is tied up in 
one of Charlotte's closed Banks. However one of 
the boys who has displayed marked athletic ability 
has been offered assistance in getting to College by 
a certain College Alumni Association. 

Two of the graduates will receive some financial 
help from the Guilds which have been providing 
clothing for them through a number of years. St. 
Paul's, Wilmington^ has a lump sum of $100 for 
their adopted son, and Christ Church, Elizabeth City 
has a paid up share of Building and Loan for their 
adopted daughter. 

In the Chapel Services, the Superintendent is as- 
sisted by one of the older boys and I am happy to 
note that some of those boys who have thus helped 
in former years, are now engaged in assisting in 
similar manner in some of our Parishes and Missions. 

A Chapel Vestry of older boys helps care for the 
Church and Grounds and an Altar Guild of older 
girls looks after the Communion Vessels and linen. 
14 were confirmed and 5 baptized during the year. 

The health of the children has been splendidly 
looked after by Dr. W. Myers Hunter and by our 
Nurse, Miss Lena Robison. I do not know how many 
pounds stouter we are this year than last, possibly 
Dr. Hunter will allude to that as he did last year in 
his report. This, however. I wish to include, that 
we are deeply grateful to Dr. Hunter for all atten- 
tion and care so freely and generously given. 

To all the doctors and dentists who seem so ready 
and willing to be of service to the Institution. To 
the Auxiliaries and Service Leagues of the three 
Dioceses for clothing the children. To Mrs. Russell 
and the Sewing Guild for much mending and gar- 
ment making. 

To St. Peter's Service League and Mrs. Wm, H. 
Williamson, Jr. in particular for Christmas and 
Easter good times. To the Moving Picture Mana- 
gers. To the Civic and Fraternal orders of the city. 
To the Barber College. To the Water Department 
and the Standard Ice and Fuel Co. To the Y. M. 
and the Y. W. C. A. To all our loyal and devoted 
friends and benefactors we return unfeigned thanks 
and most grateful appreciation. - 

In my annual report of 1928 I made the sugges- 
tion that "By reason of our location in the center 
of a large and rapidly growing city, it seems to me 
that the Thompson Orphanage is well fitted to un- 
dertake a wider field of service, probably in the near 
future. That is to establish a central bureau staffed 
with trained workers, both salaried and volunteer, 
consisting of physicians, social and case workers 



and a psychiatrist, who would be able, thoroughly 
and expertly, to diagnose each case presented and 
to prescribe the special care and treatment needed 
for that ease." I am glad to say that that sugges- 
tion is now being arried out by the Junior League 
of Charlotte through a "Children's Welfare Bu- 
reau". The offer has been extended, very gener- 
ously to the Thompson Orphanage by this Bureau 
to help us with any of our cases coming from the 
city or county. Furthermore, the Junior League 
has appointed one of their number, Mrs. Owen Fitz- 
simons to meet with our Committee in the carrying 
out of this plan of cooperation in our common task. 

Another splendid forward step, is the establish- 
ment of a Mental Health Clinic, presided over by 
Dr. Sylvia Allen, whom we are so fortunate as to 
have on our staff. The purpose of this Clinic is for 
the early detection and treatment of behaviour and 
personality problems in children. The staff consists 
of Drs. Allen, Choate and Hunt, and Miss Elsie 
Larsen, Psychiatric Case Worker. 

Clearly the order of the day is for a coordination 
of all the child-welfare agencies so that the individ- 
ual child may have the best possible chance. The 
little child of our day, must be set at the heart of 
all our planning and practice, even as our Lord 
took the little child of His day and set him in the 
midst of His followers. 

With a larger number of children graduating each 
year from High School the problem of placing these 
graduates and others who leave, becomes increas- 
ingly difficult to solve. It has been suggested by 
Mr. Owens, chairman of the Executive Committee, 
that the names of all children expecting to leave 
the Orphanage, be submitted early in the year, to 
the "Thompson Orphanage Committee" in the local- 
ity nearest to that from which the children come, in 
order to have ample time to arrange for their place- 
ment. This is a fine suggestion and we shall do our 
best to take advantage of it. 

Someone has said that "Preparation for discharge, 
•should begin soon after a child is admitted", and 
that is a true saying, for there is so much to be done 
in the matter of preparing a child to step out into 
the world from the rather cloistered confines of an 
Orphanage. 

Such preparation should include, among other 
things — some knowledge of the value of money; 
some training in social usages and customs; suf- 
ficient knowledge of a trade or handicraft to enable 
one to hold a job ; opportunities for testing ones 
own judgment and for the development of initiative. 

One of the most delicate and difficult of the tasks 
confronting us, is the guidance of the child as he 



6 



THE MISSION HERALD 



attains adolescence. It is a time when the child 
steps over the line, or out of the shell, from depen- 
dence to independence. It requires boundless pa- 
tience and sympathy to secure independent. GOOD- 
NESS from the boy or gir? of that age. 

Many years ago, there was established, largely 
through the efforts of Dr. Jacobs, the great President 
and Founder of both Thornwell Orphanage and 
Presbyterian College at Clinton, S. G, the Tri-State 
Orphanage Association. This Association meets an- 
anually for the discussion of just such problems as 
have been referred to above. There is always a 
large attendance, not only from the three states of 
North and South Carolina and Georgia, but from 
Virginia and Alabama and from the Child Welfare 
League of America. 

This year, on April 24-25, the Tri-State Conference 
is scheduled to meet at the Thompson Orphanage 
as our guests. It should constitute a real oppor- 
tunity and privilege for us all. Not only for the 
staff, but for members of the Board and Executive 
Committee as well. 

If it meets Avith the approval of the Board of 
Managers, T should like to ask the appointment of 
a committee to help arrange for the entertainment 
of the delegates to this Conference. 

Under the heading "Occupational Therapy" which 
being interpreted means healing through doing, I 
Avould call your attention to the request made by 
the Assistant Superintendent at the Executive Com- 
mittee meeting of June 13th. At that meeting Mr. 
Bynum pointed out the need for some kind of shop 
equipment, especially since the city schools have 
been forced to suspend this work, and stressed 
especially the value of such equipment during the 
long summer vacation. It should prove of much 
value in determining and developing vocational 
trends. 

The year 1935 promises to be "still another hard 
year." 

Interest on the Endowment Funds has dropped 
heavily, while the cost of food and other necessities 
is steadily mounting. Many repairs need to be 
made to our buildings and equipment. Cuts and 
curtailments have been made in all departments to 
try and keep pace with ihe diminishing income, but 
the budget for 1935 exceeds the anticipated income 
by a considerable amount. 

Therefore we are compelled to look, for even 
larger gifts and contributions than heretofore made, 
from the Parishes. Missions, Sunday Schools and 
Individuals throughout the three Dioceses, if the 
work of the Orphanage is to be continued as it is 
operating now. 



The appeal for the dependent child should be 
paramount, and we believe that it is. 

We do feel that it is a high and Christ-like thing 
to provide for some of the least of these His breth- 
ren, an opportunity to grow strong in body, mind 
and spirit. And feeling so, we know we shall nut 
fail those boys and girls who have been entrusted 
to our care. 



CHRISTMAS BOX REPORT 



Announcing the part your boys and girls played 
in the Christmas box effort for the year 11934. The 
Church Schools and Service Leagues, numbering 33, 
made the following contributions : 

San Juan Episcopal Hospital, Farmington, New 
Mexico, 355 gifts valued at $132.09; All Souls' Mis- 
sion, Spartanburg, S. O, 66 gifts valued at $21.11; 
Seamen's Church Institute, New Orleans, La., 16 
gifts valued at $18.62; Total, 437 gifts valued at 
$171.82. 

Cash : Diocese of Kyoto, Japan, $20.00 ; San Juan 
Hospital, Farmington, Ncav Mexico, (candy) $25.00; 
St. James' Mission, North Emporia, Va., $12.00; 
Total, $57.00. Grand Total, $228.82. 

Although a few Church Schools who have been 
accustomed to sending Christmas boxes were unable 
to do so this year, I made several new contacts in 
return. The work for 1934- beins' satisfactory, mak- 
ing a small increase in the number of gifts and a 
relative gain in value. 

T am asking the Church Schools and Service 
Leagues what they have gained in worship and 
study? The above information gives'the mechanical 
details but you alone can furnish the ethical part, 
which is a belter understanding of the lives of other 
people, knitting our lives into one bond of fellowship 
with them, through Christ. This is oiir duty "If 
We Be His Disciples". 

MRS. A. T. ST.AMAND 



SAINT STEPHEN'S GOLDSBORO LOSES 
COMMUNION SILVER 



On Saturday night, February 23rd, the Church 
was entered and the Communion Silver and Alms 
Basons were stolen. The thieves did not take any 
of the brass nor the private Communion Set. The 
Alms Basons were solid silver and memorials. No 
trace of the stolen articles has been found. All 
'Churches should keep their silver securely locked 
up. It is thought by the police that a band of 
robbers are traveling over the country and one of 
their activities is entering Churches. 



MARCH, 1935 



GENERAL CHURCH NEWS 



The story of John and Elizabeth St am who were 
murdered by communists in China, leaving their 
three-months-old baby, is told in The Missionary 
Review of the World for March. They were young 
missionaries on the staff of the China Inland Mission. 
The murder took place only a hundred miles from 
Wuhu. 

When the baby, after being left entirely alone for 
thirty hours, was rescued by friendly Chinese and 
brought to the Wuhu General Hospital, the Sisters 
at St. Lioba's Mission were able to send over some 
nice warm clothes and other things that had come 
in Woman's Auxiliary boxes. The women in the 
United States who made the things for Chinese waifs 
could never have thought that they would be used 
for a little American survivor of such a great trag- 
edy. The baby has gone to its grandparents who 
are Presbyterian missionaries in North China. 

An elderly Chinese Christian, Chiang Shu-sen, 
risked his life to intercede for the missionaries and 
he too was murdered. 



Although it is a happy thing that we can say that 
at least a good part of our work is assured for the 
coming year, we shall do well to redouble our efforts 
in missionary education. — Southern Churchman, edi- 
torial on The Balanced Budget. 



Just one of the minor difficulties of financing the 
Church's work in Cuba is the fact that before our 
missionaries can receive their packages of Lenten 
Offering boxes they have to pay duty on them. 



Okolona Industrial School in Mississippi has been 
adopted by the city of Okolona as its Negro high 
school and by the state authorities as the teacher- 
training school for northeast Mississippi. This is 
one of the schools of the American Church Institute 
for Negroes. 



St. Mary's Hall, the Church's school for girls in 
Shanghai, has '304 enrolled this year. The girls have 
a Patriotic Club which runs a student shop, and 
from time to time uses some of the profits to buy 
Chinese books for the school library. 



A prayer for protection against locusts is in a 
litany of the Church in South Africa. They are a 
devastating evil; they destroy the people's food and 
they make such inroads on the crops, and hence on 
incomes, that the people cannot keep up their contri- 
butions to their Church. 



The year 1934 had the largest number on record 
confirmed in the diocese of Western North Carolina, 
316. Bishop Gribbin's consecration took place Jan- 
uary 25, 1934. 



The Church School of St. David's Parish, Austin, 
Texas, where the Rev. James S. Allen is rector, has a 
neat new four-page printed monthly paper. They 
are calling it The News until they think of a better 

name. . 

A MESSAGE TO THE CHURCH 



What seemed impossible a short time ago has been 
accomplished. The National Council is able to an- 
nounce that the budget is balanced on the basis of 
the Emergency Schedule prepared by the General 
Convention. A threatened deficit of large amount 
has been turned into a small balance on the right 
side through the loyal and generous response from 
friends of the missionary work of the Church. To 
these as to many dioceses and parishes grateful 
acknowledgement is made. 

The first fraits of this successful result were to 
be seen at once in the three-day meeting of the 
National Council just completed. Instead of strug- 
gling with a deficit, allocating another cut, and 
hurriedly planning a supplementary appeal, the 
members of the Council were able to give their atten- 
tion to the work itself, and to enter upon their con- 
structive task of directing the Church's activities. 
To these projects they turned with glad and serious 
deliberation. 

The important work of restoration still lies ahead. 
The Council recognizes the fact that the Emergency 
Schedule is the least that should be done. But it 
marks a turning point from which the Church can 
go forward. The retreat is stopped and the advance 
will follow. 

It is the desire of the Council to share this encour- 
aging news Avith the whole Church. Its officers 
make the announcement with the joy of those who 
bring good tidings. "The night is far spent: the 
day is at hand." 

Lent with its spiritual calls can be welcomed with 
a full sense of the blessing that the season brings. 
The discipline of our souls, the more complete know- 
ledge of God through Christ, the deepening of our 
communion with Him will strengthen us to meet 
without fear the opportunities which are ours as a 
Christian people — as a Church. Let us thank God 
and take courage. 

JAMES DeWOLF PERRY, Presiding Bishop 

PHILIP COOK, President, National Council 

Church Missions House, — Spirit of Missions 



THE MISSION HERALD 



The Mission Herald 

ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 

Published Monthly except July and Augrust at 

507 Southern Building 
WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor 

REV. WALTER R. NOE 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 

RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 

MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 
Advertising rates furnished on application. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to receive 
their papers, should promptly notify the Business Man- 
ager, giving when necessary, both the old and new ad- 
dress. 

FOLLOWING THE MASTER 



An Editorial By Bishop Johnson 



The problem which faces us as a nation is not so 
much one of political or economic mechanics as it is 
one of individual character. No system can bring 
love, joy or peace to a people who are self-centered, 
self-indulgent and self-satisfied. It is not a question 
of mass production so much as it is one of individual 
righteousness. In my judgment Christ has the only 
remedy for human ills but His message is to the 
individual conscience rather than to the crowds. 
The only thing that the Master ever ran away from 
was the multitude. He seemed to distrust the effect 
of mob psychology and to place His confidence in 
the faith and devotion of individual souls. 

"Follow me," "Lovcst thou me," "Do this in 
remembrance of me." "If you love me keep my 
commandments." He never tried to ivork from the 
upper circles to the common people but He sowed 
His seed in the soil of the individual soul. He chose 
the foolish things of the world to confound the wise; 
the weak to confound th«3 mighty; the things that 
the mighty despised to bring to naught the existing 
agencies that no flesh should glory in His presence. 

He not only avoided the crowd but He deprecated 
any statistical estimate of His labors. Because He 
ate and drank with publicans and sinners He of- 
fended the self-righteous pietists, and because He 
demanded repentance and amendment He lost the 
sinners. The Church has the same embarrassment, 



At the close of His ministry, the number of those 
who left all to follow Him was one hundred and 
twenty. He put principle before policy and per- 
sonal devotion before academic philosophies. He 
never chose to be popular at the expense of truth 
and He explained the rejection of His Gospel in the 
fateful words, "Because I tell you the truth, ye 
will not believe me." 

Pie never assured us that the world would accept 
His standards, but called out of the world those who 
believed in His mission. On the other hand he bade 
His followers to be "in the world but not of it." 
which unfortunately has been too often understood 
by the clergy as being of the world but not really 
in it. 

It is a difficult role to play, and yet one which 
is thrilling because of its difficulty. To stand for 
His ideals and yet not to stand aloof from all sorts 
of publicans and sinners ; to be the salt without losing 
savor; to be the cream without turning sour; to be 
the leaven without giving a brown taste to the 
bread ; to permeate without trying to dictate or to 
dominate: to lose one's identity in effecting the 
result; to avoid the tendency of serving God to be 
seen of men, of demanding that we shall have per- 
sonal credit instead of being content if the end is 
achieved, no matter by whom. 

We are here to do His will; not to acquire a 
popular reputation. This latter affects all that we 
do. It results in larsrer confirmation classes but 
too often at the cost of adequate preparation. It 
results in padded communicant lists which too often 
are a liability rather than an asset because of the 
number who are inactive. Tt results in parochialism 
which is pernicious anemia and a dioccsanism which 
is creeping paralysis. 

There is nothing more certain of ultimate extinc- 
tion than a parish whose soul interest is in its own 
comfort. The whole diocese can be no stronger than 
the sum total of its communicants and the dynamic 
force which they create. Each communicant is re- 
sponsible for his or her own influence in the area 
of the parish in which lie or she is a servant of 
Christ. Each member of the Church is worth as 
much as his word is worth — as expressed in his 
baptismal vow. The Avorst that a servant can do 
is to do nothing. 

The Church suffers more from its listless servants 
than it does from its militant enemies. When it 
comes to our support of the work of the whole 
Church. I am afraid that our gifts — small as they 
aro— exceed our real interest. I am of the opinion 
that the Church suffers more from the self consti- 
tuted censors than it does from the hostile censures 



MARCH, 1935 



from without. If you really love the household of. 
faith you don't go around abusing it. The members 
of your own family may be irritating but you are not 
apt to publish their deficiencies. I am not advocat- 
ing that we be blind to our ineffectiveness ; merely 
that we be dumb in broadcasting it. 

Too often our real enemies are those of our own 
household, whose ability to find fault far exceeds 
their willingness to find work. So much of our 
demand for perfection is vicarious. It is something 
that we demand of someone else and our alibi is 
that because the other fellow is a quitter, therefore 
we are exempt from our own obligations. 

It reminds mo of the answer made by a missionor 
to the question in the question box : Ought a profane 
man be a member of the Church? The answer was, 
"He ought not to be profane. However, if the 
question refers to himself he ought to confess his 
sin and repent, but if it refers to some other member 
of the congregation, it is none of his business. It 
is the Lord's problem." 

I know that Christians are provoking, but I am 
reminded of a story that I heard about Robert E. 
Lee who gave a glowing testimonial to a confederate 
officer. "But," said his questioner, "this officer 
hr;s a very poor opinion of you, General Lee." "I 
didn't know." Lee replied, "that you wanted to 
know his opinion of me, I thought you asked my 
opinion of him." 

If we could reach that point where we were so- 
licilous about saying all the eood we could about 
our neighbor, regardless of what he thonght of 
us. we Avould be much nearer Christ's standard 
than we are, — The Witness 



MEETING OF ANNUAL CONVENTION 



The Annual Convention of the Diocese will meet 
in St. Paul's Church, Beaufort, the Rev. Lawrence 
M. Fenwick, Rector, May 15 and 16, 1935. 



NEW BUILDING FOR AHOSKIE 



In order to use a lot that the Church has owned 
for several years and to provide a much needed home 
for the Rector, St. Thomas', Ahoskie will build at 
an early date a two-apartment house, that can even- 
tually , if desired, be turned into a parish house. 
Until the building is paid for, one of the apartments 
Will be rented and the other will be occupied by the 
Rector and his family. The Rev. J. Leon Malone 
is Rector of this and other parishes and missions in 
Hertford and Gates Counties. 



ST. THOMAS', ATKINSON 

At the request of the congregation, the Rev. A. H. 
Marshall will hold a morning service in St. Thomas', 
Atkinson on each fifth Sunday. The parish has 
been vacant for more than a year and it will mean 
much to the people to have Mr. Marshall for these 

services. 

DEDICATION OF CHAPEL 



The new Chapel at Camp Bragg, near Fayetteville, 
will be dedicated April 28th and Bishop Darst has 
been asked to take part in the service. The Rev. 
Archer Boogher of St. John's, Fayetteville holds 
services at Camp Bragg and is making a real con- 
tribution to the work. 



DIOCESE TO LOSE A FAITHFUL WORKER 



Miss Mary Hardin, who has served as secretary 
in the Diocesan office for a number of years, will 
be married to Mr. Lenox Cooper of Wilmington, April 
27th and will give up her work in the office about 
the middle of April. She has made a real contri- 
bution to the work of the Diocese by her faithful 
and efficient service. We appreciate all that she 
has done for ns and wish for her many years of 
happiness 



ALL SOULS', NORTHWEST 



The work of painting the Church building at 
North West will begin in a few days. The work 
will be done by the members of the congregation. 
The Rev. A. H. Marshall is the Rector. 



ST. PAUL'S, CLINTON 



The members of St. Paul's, Clinton are interested 
in putting the Church property in good condition. 

The Rectory has been repaired recently and work 
has been done on the roof of the Church. The 
Woman's Auxiliary has purchased a carpet for the 
Church. Services are held on the Second and fourth 
Sunday evenings by the Rev. Archer Boogher of 
Fayetteville and occasional Communion services by 
the Executive Secretary. 



WANTED 



A Chalice and Paten for Mission — Ours has been 
stolen — Wouldn't YOU like to give us one? 

Communicate with Rev. Wm. Latta, Box 93, Lum 
berton. N. C. 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD 




NOTES FROM FRIENDLY HALL 

GREENVILLE, N. C. 



Although February has bsen a short month Friend- 
ly Hall has been busy with many activities. We 
started with a very interesting meeting of our Aux- 
iliary, at which the Reverend Edwin Moseley, of 
Williamston, gave us an address on China, where he 
had served eight years as a missionary. Mr. Moseley 
told us of the Avonderful work being carried on by 
the Church in China, and showed us that we have a 
part in the program, although we are not in the for- 
eign field. We were happy also to have with us on 
this occasion, Mrs. James G. Staton, who did a great 
deal towards the establishment of the Student Center 
here and has always shown a keen merest in Friendly 
Hall and the College girls. Eleanor Jones, who was 
one of our group last year, came with Mr. Moseley 
and Mrs. Staton, as she is teaching in Williamston 
this year. It was great to have Eleanor back, if 
only for so short a time. 

At this meeting it was decided to have a Chairman 
of Social Activities for the Saturday afternoon gath- 
erings, and Minnie Ross was chosen to serve in this 
capacity. Minnie has appointed a different hostess 
and supper committee for each time, and we feel 
that the success of the Saturday afternoons in Feb- 
ruary have been due to this as well as to the interest 
shown by the members of the "B" Branch of the 
Auxiliary who have made our suppers much more 
attractive by the addition of sandwiches, cakes, etc. 
A real delightful feature of these occasions has been 
singing by Miss Bessie Brown and Mrs. Wicker, 
who have introduced us to some of the newest songs 
as well as singing some of the old favorites for us. 
One afternoon Minnie Ross brought her mother and 
her younger sister to Friendly Hall, and we were so 
glad to have the opportunity to get acquainted with 
them; we are hoping Minnie's sister will be one of 
our group before long, as she is nearly ready fur 
College. Among other visitors we enjoyed having 
during the month were Miss Rainwater and Miss 
Newdl of the College faculty. Last Saturday Min- 
nie Ma Hoy shared with her friends the lovely birth- 



day cake her mother had sent her — Mrs. Malloy 
always makes a real big cake so that Minnie may 
bring it to Friendly Hall. 

Another activity our Auxiliary has participated in 
this month is serving with the Altar Committee of 
the Church. Although we are merely helping in 
minor ways, at the same time we are observing just 
how the Altar Guild work is done so that when we 
may become members of such a guild we will know 
Avhat is expected of us. This work is purely volun- 
tary on the part of our Auxiliary, but we hope that 
before June every confirmed member will have 
availed herself of this opportunity. 

The meetings of our Executive Council which out- 
lines plans for the Auxiliary are full of interest each 
time. These come about the middle of the month 
and are attended by only the officers and chairmen. 
At our February meeting we discussed the program 
for the rest of the year — that is, through May — and 
made definite progress towards carrying out our 
Social Service project which includes making a lay- 
ette. This we expect to complete in March. Al- 
though business was the special objective for this 
meeting, we were not averse to laying it aside and 
winding up with a waffle supper. 

MARY TARRY 

Chairman of Publicity 



CAMP LEACH— -WASHINGTON, N. C. 

' Camp Leach will open this year on June 17th, 
when the Y. P. S. L. will start their two weeks. The 
Rev. George S. Gresham, will direct this Camp again 
this year. The staff has not been completed as yet, 
but we are sure to have some of last year's faculty 
and counsellors. One of the new members of the 
faculty will be the Rev. Thomas Wright of Lexing- 
ton, Virginia. 

The Junior Boys' Camp will begin on June 30th 
and end on July 14th. The Rev. George S. Gresham, 
will direct this Camp again this year. We hope to 
have a real handicraft program with a skilled leader 
at this Camp. 

The Junior Girls' Camp will open on July 14th 
and end on July 28th. Miss Maxine Westfall of 
Fayetteville will direct this Camp. Again we hope 
to have more handicraft work at this Camp. 

The Midget Camp will run for one week from July 
28th until August 4th. We have not decided on a 
director for this Camp as yet. 

The a«e limits will be strictly enforced this year. 

Senior Camp, 15 to 25: Junior Boys', 12 to 15; 
Junior Girls', 12 to 15; Midgets, 9 to 12. 

Also the Camps will be limited to one hundred 
campers at each. 



MARCH, 1935 



11 



TWENTY-FOURTH ANNIVERSARY CELE- 
BRATED BY CHOIR MEMBERS 



Edmund H. Harding- For Twenty-four Years Organ- 
ist at St. Peter's Episcopal Church Entertained 
at Party at Parish House Friday Evening 



In recognition of his faihful sertVices as organist 
of St. Peter's Episcopal Church for 24 years, mem- 
bers of the choir entertained Friday evening for 
Edmund H. Harding, the celebration being given 
at the Parish House following the choir practice 
period. 

At a long table centered with an artistic arrange- 
ment of jonquils and spirea the party group enjoyed 
a delicious ice course with bon bons. A large cake, 
bearing 24 candles was cut when the refreshments 
were served. 

During the refreshment period the honoree w.us 
lauded in rhyme and song, the outstanding selection 
being a composition, sung to the tune of America 
Avhich was written by Mrs. John Bonner. 
The verses read as follows : 

"Our Eddie 'tis of thee 

Organist of liberty 

Of thee we sing. 

Let all our voices rise 

Laud him until he dies 

Praise him up to the skies 

Our thanks we bring. 

Your choir is proud of thee, 
Twenty-four years and we 
Still thy name love. 
We love your fancy frills 
While o'er the keys you spill 
Some of those pretty trills 
Like a cooing dove. 

Your music, if you please 
Can calm, and may appease 
When things go wrong. 
All stops and manuals wake 
And e'en the organ shakes 
When our own Eddie fakes 
A Cantata long. 

Thru all the years with thee 

You've no su-peri-ority 

To thee we sing. 

Long may your eyes be bright 

So yon can lead us right 

Up to those heavenly heights 

Of which we sing." 



Fulfilling a desire long cherished by "Eddie" the 
Rev. Stephen Gardner, rector of the church, presented 
the honoree with a barometer, saying that the organ- 
ist's services had outstandingly aided the church's 
program "You have been a great help to me", the 
rector emphasized. 

In addition to choir members, Mr. and Mrs. Hard- 
ing and the Rev. Stephen Gardner, the following 
attended : Mrs. Mary Respass, David Bell, Presby- 
terian Church organist. Mrs. Dave Bell and Miss 
Hattie Sizer. 

Some of the toasts offered during the evening 
were as follows: 

Dear Eddie Boy, our organist : for these four and 
twenty years, 

You've meant so much to all of us, through joys 
and also tears. 

It's hard to try and express to you the love that 

is in our hearts, 
But, maybe this ice-cream, candy and cake will 
surely say a part. 

And our best wish for you, tonight, and in the 

days to come, 
Is when Old Gabriel does arrive, you'll show him 

how to strum. 
The Washington (N. 0.) Daily News, March 2. 1935. 



ORDINATION OF REV. E. C. McCONNELL 



On March 5th, Rev. Edward C. McConnell was 
advanced to the Priesthood by Bishop Thomas C. 
Darst in The Church of the Good Shepherd, Wil- 
mingon, N. C. He was presented by the Rev. E. W. 
Halleck. The sermon was preached by the Rev. 
W. H. Milton, D. D. The Epistle was read by Rev. 
David Yates; the Gospel by Rev. W. M. Latta ; the 
Litany by Rev. John B. Gibble. The Rev. Alexander- 
Miller was also present and joined in the imposition 
of hands. 

Mr. McConnell will remain in charge of The Church 
of the Good Shepherd, where he has served as 
Deacon. 



The first great step of the Forward Movement 
must be a call to the people of the Church back +o 
the Bible and their Prayer Books. 

The first need on the part of the people of the 
Church is a fuller and more real conversion to Christ. 
The second is more, and a more believing, reading 
of the Bible itself and with it the Prayer Book, the 
handbook of the Church. 

— Bishop Manning 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD 



REV. JOHN W. HARDY IS ORDAINED PRIEST 



Impressive Service Is Held at St. Andrew's Church, 
Columbia; Many Attend 



By Mrs. Alex. C. D. Noe 

Ayden, March 6. — Rev. John William Hardy of 
Seven Springs, Lenoir County, was advanced to the 
priesthood of the Protestant Episcopal Church, Mon- 
day. March 4th, by Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst, Bishop 
of the Diocese of East Carolina and eight ministers 
joined in the laying on of hands in the sacrament. 
The service was held at St. Andrew's Church, Colum- 
bia, of which Mr. Hardy has been minister for the 
past year, while serving his diaconate, he is also in 
charge of Christ Church and St. David's, Creswell 
and in charge of the Galilee Mission and School at 
Lake Phelps. Mr. Hardy is the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Laut Hardy of Seven Springs. 

The ordination siermon was preached by Rev. 
Charles Williams of Christ Church, New Bern. The 
candidate was presented to the Bishop, Right Rev. 
Thomas C. Darst, by Rev. A. C. D. Noe of Ayden, 
his former rector. The Litany was read by Rev. 
Stephen Gardner, of St. Peter's Church, Washington, 
the Epistle was read by Rev. Worth Wicker of St. 
Paul's Church, Greenville, and the Gospel was read 
by Rev. George Frank Hill of Christ Church, Eliza- 
beth City. Other ministers present and taking part 
in the imposition of hands were Rev. W. R. Noe, of 
Wilmington, executive secretary of the Diocese, Rev. 
William H. R. Jackson, of the Church of the Holy 
Cross, Aurora; Rev. Edwin F. Moseley of the Church 
of the Advent, Williamston and Rev. Sidney Mat- 
thews of Washington, Priest in charge of St. Paul's, 
Vanceboro, and a group of other churches. 

After the service a luncheon was served the visit- 
ors in the home of Mrs. J. F. Schlez, after which 
Earl Cahoon paid a tribute to Mr. Hardy and pre- 
sented a purse from St. Andrew's Church as a token 
of the high esteem and love of the congregation. 



HOLY INNOCENTS', SEVEN SPRINGS 



A play was presented by St. Mark's 'Church, 
Grifton, entitled "An Old Fashioned School", at 
the Parish House Friday niffht. It was attended 
by a rather large crowd. Supper was served cafe 
style to the characters of the play and visitors by 
the Woman's Auxiliary and the Y. P. S. L. 

Rev. A. C. D. Noe of Ayden. our rector, is holdincr 
services every Saturday afternoon during Lent at 
3 :30 o'clock at the Church. 

The Woman's Auxiliary held its regular meeting 



Saturday afternoon at 2:30. A very interesting- 
program was given by some of the members on the. 
Lenten Offering. One of the things the Auxiliary 
is working on is piecing up bed quilts for the Or 
phanage. Each member is making a square. Then 
the squares are going to be put together and striped 
and then later on when we see fit we are going to 
quilt the quilts and send them to the Orphanage. At 
the end of the program a beautiful poem was given 
by Mrs. J. G. Whitfield, which she composed herself. 
It reads as follows: 

What is life to you, if you give nothing away? 
You are stamping your life each day that you live, 
By the good deeds that you do and the things that 

you give. 
By the words that you say, each night when you 

pray. 
What is your life to you if you give nothing away? 

Sometimes the skies are blue, again very gray, 

But yOu can make them brighter by giving some- 
thing away. 

You must learn to share with others, and make 
your home a better place to live, 

So look around today and find something to give. 

For God loves the cheerful giver, as the Book of 
books doth say; 

What is your life to you, if you give nothing away? 



THE WOMAN'S AUXILIARY OF ST. STEPHEN'S, 
GOLDSBORO 



The Woman's Auxiliary of S. Stephen's Church 
is well launched upon its work for 1935, with the 
same official personnel as, last year. The regular 
meetings are held on the first Monday of each month 
and the Programs, "as outlined in the booklet, are 
followed. 

The February meeting was that of Christian Social 
Service. At this meeting, Mrs. John Spicer, District 
Chairman of the F. E. R. A. gave a very interesting 
talk, showing the scope of the work, and outlining 
what the Woman's Auxiliary could do by way of 
assistance and cooperation. 

At this meeting it was decided to make a cash 
donation each month to the milk fund for the under- 
nourished children in one of the Primary Schools, 
also to collect and give to the proper authorities 
discarded clothing. Tn addition to this, the Aux- 
iliary has been taking magazines and papers to the 
County Home regularly. 

On February 18. our Diocesan President, Mrs. 
Fred Outland, visited the Parish and gave interest- 
ing and inspirational talks to the separate guilds. 



MARCH, 1935 



13 



These meetings were well attended. 

Each Guild is actively at work, endeavoring to 
raise their pledges before the summer months arrive. 

On February 22, St. Mary's Guild gave a square 
dance, which was both a financial and a social su<r 
ess. This Guild is now sponsoring a series of cake 
and pie sales. 

St. Agnes Guild is serving a series of suppers, on 
Wednesday evenings in the Parish House. St. Steph- 
en's Guild assists and cooperates with the others in 
every way possible. These affairs serve the two-fold 
purpose of raising funds for the work of the Aux- 
iliary and of bringing the members into closer social 
contact with each other. 

Each Friday afternoon during Lent, the Auxiliary 
is holding a special study group, using the book, 
"The Episcopal Church, Heritage of American Chris- 
tians", written by Eev. Theodore St. Clair Will, 
rector of St. John's Church, Hampton, Va. This 
group discussion is led in a very interesting and 
instructive manner by the rector, Rev. George S. 

Gresham. 

ST. MARY'S, KINSTON 



"Cousin Fannie" Laughinghouse, 88 years old in 
January has departed this life. She was educated 
at St. Mary's and Patopsco. Always was she alert 
to learn things to keep her mind bright and her wits 
keen. She was "Cousin Fanny" to most of the 
people in both Lenoir and Pitt Counties. Her guest 
list comprised both old and young. She wanted to 
know "the news", what was doing. A thorough 
example of the old school in every way was Fannie. 

Dr. Ira M. Hardy is on the si^k list. He was sent 
to the hospital and has not yet gotten well enough 
to get out on the streets. His friend^ are missiny 
him very much. 

The following "tobacco folks" have returned from 
their several locations: Mr. and Mrs. Dempsev Hod- 
ges, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Armistead, Mr. and Mrs. 
John Jenkins and Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Long. 

During the recent illness of the rector, Thomas 
Jeffress (yes, Tim) had the service, doing just fine 
as usual. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Jeffreys, 
visited their son, Clarence, in Morganton recently. 
Clarence had a mild case of appendicitis but has 
now recovered. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Norman, bride and groom, 
stopped with Mrs. Norman's parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
S. C. Sitterson, for a short visit on their way to Los 
.Angeles where Mr. Norman plans to enter the movies. 
The bride was Miss Bedie Sitterson. Here's luck. 
Hope we see you both on the screen. 



Our part time preacher, John William Hardy, now 
spells his name Reverend Mr. Hardy. "They say" 
he has a fine mission work at Lake Phelps. My! 
He preached his first sermon to us on the text "What 
doth the Lord Require". Congratulations, Rev. Mr. 
Hardy. 

Van Jones, 4 year old son of Mrs. Helen Laughing- 
house Jones, of the St. John's section, has been sent 
to the orthopedic hospital for an operation on his 
arm which was injured at birth. 

Miss Lacy Johnson had the organ on a recent 
Sunday. M'iss Johnson made a fine pinchhitter. 
Many things contribute to make a fine organist, but 
mainly an appreciation of music. Miss Johnson's 
performance showed her aware of these points. 
Hope she continues her study. 

Kinstonians and people of Lenoir County regret 
to learn of the death of Mrs. Ann Dawson. Mrs. 
Dawson had a whole county full of friends and 
slices in others counties. Her husband was Mr. John 
Dawson, County Treasurer, for a good part of his 
life. Her son, Mr. John Dawson, at one time in the 
Legislature, is known throughout the State. 

Our Miss Mary Dodson and her sister Miss Steva 
just will get in the news. Miss Mary went to Phila- 
delphia and had a cataract successfully removed 
from her eye ; and now she and Miss Steva have had 
their house moved and given part of the lot for the 
new Presbyterian Church building. 

Mrs. G. V. Cowper who broke her hip last summer 
has entirely recovered. Her daughter, young Jeann?, 
together with several relatives was bitten by a mad 
dog. a special pet of Jeanne's. Jeanne took the 
treatment — and how's she doing? Fine, thank you. 

Edith Winn Powell, four year old daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. T. G. Powell, won out in a beauty 
contest and was named "M'iss Kinston, Junior". 

Tommy Rucker, we should say Miss Meta Rucker, 
is at Flora McDonald this year. Tommy lost her 
Prayer Book at the Presbyterian Church. The lost 
book was found and returned and was the means 
of Tommy's making sojne Episcopal friends. 

During January Mrs. Lena Kilpatrick Quinerly 
died at her home in Ayden after several weeks of 
protracted illness. She was a former member of 
St, John's. Pitt County, a former teacher and a 
faithful and devoted member of her beloved Epis- 
copal Church. After removing to Ayden she and 
some other few faithfuls labored and worked until 
they finally succeeded in getting St. James estab- 
lished and a church built. The work begun by 
the little group is now showing results and St. James 
is becoming quite a strong little mission. 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD 



MOREHOUSE PUBLISHING COMPANY TO OPEN 

A DISTRIBUTING CENTER IN 

NEW YORK CITY 



Milwaukee, Wisconsin-— An expanding national 
business has resulted in the decision of the More 
house Publishing Company of Milwaukee to open 
a distributing center in New York Oity. The ad- 
dress will be 12 East 41st Street. 

This company, publishers to the Episcopal Church, 
last year celebrated its 50th anniversary and quietly 
began plans for the opening of a New York Church 
bookstore. The opening will be on or bout July 15. 

The New York City bookstore will be a wholesale 
and retail distributing center for the Morehouse 
publications and supplies. It will serve the publi- 
cations and supply requirements of the clergymen, 
laymen, and laywomen, and also will be headquarters 
for superintendents and teachers purchasing supplier 
for Church Schools. 

In addition to the Morehouse publications, the 
leading religious books and supplies of other pub- 
lisher's will be carried in stock. The most complete 
list of Mowbray and Faith Press (England) publi- 
cations will be carried in stock at all times. 

Harold C Barlow, sales manager of the publishing 
company, will be sent to New York to take charge 
of the store. He has been with the Morehouse Pub- 
lishing Co. since 1924, and has a well rounded know- 
ledge of the publishing field, having been employed 
successively .in the collection department, as credit 
manager, in charge of sales promotion, and as sales 
manager. 

Mr. Barlow also is active in Episcopal Church af- 
fairs, having served in 1927 and 1928 as a member 
of the national commission of the Federation of 
Episcopal Yottng People, and is at present a member 
of the national council of the Brotherhood of St. 
Andrew. 

The Morehouse Publishing Company will maintain 
its main offices and publishing plant in Milwaukee, 
Avhere the third generation of the Morehouse family 
is continuing- the work begun in 1884 by Linden H. 
Morehouse. From a small Church School publication 
has «rown the largest publishing house in the entire 
Episcopal Church. 



Four clergy have recently gone from parishes in 
the Diocese of York to mission fields, one each to 
Portuguese East Africa, the Sudan, Northern Rho- 
desia, and the West Tndies. 



IN MEMORIAM 

MRS. JOHN G. WOOD, HAYES, EDENTON, N. C. 



In the passing into the higher life of Bessie Martin 
Wood, our branch of the Woman's Auxiliary of St.. 
Paul's, Edenton, has given into our Father's keeping 
a beloved member. 

She was interested and faithful and will be sadly 
missed. May her loyalty to her Church prove an 
inspiration to each member of the Auxiliary. 

Therefore be it Resolved : That we, the members 
of St. Paul's Auxiliary, extend our love and sym- 
pathy to her bereaved family, assuring them that 
their loss is our loss ; and commend them to a loving 
Heavenly Father for comfort and peace, 

That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the 
family of the bereaved, to the local newspapers, and 
be spread upon the minutes. 

ANNE SHEPARD GRAHAM 
L. K. SUMMERELL 
EMILY B. ELLIOTT 



MRS. RACHEL FRANCES LAUGHINGHOUSE 



Convocation of the missionary district of Liberia, 
which was to have been held in January, was can- 
celled. 



On February 28th, 1935, the sweet spirit of Mrs, 
Rachel Frances Laughinghouse fell asleep in Jesus. 

She was a true type of Southern womanhood, a 
cheerful christian, a faithful attendant at all Church 
services and a generous contributor to all of its 
needs. 

Her optimism, keen wit and kindly humor en- 
deared her to all who knew her. 

These characteristics seem to have been with her 
throughout all of her long life of eighty-eight years, 
but were especially noticeable when on her bed of 
pain, with no promise of recovery, she would always 
greet you with a smile that expressed far better 
than words her perfect resignation to the will of her 
Heavenly Father whom she so soon would meet 
"face to face". 

Therefore be it Resolved: That St, Mary's Church 
and the Woman's Auxiliary have lost a beloved 
and devoted member. 

Resolved further: That a cony of this Memorial 
be spread upon the Minutes of our Auxiliary and 
St. Anne's Chapter, of which she was a fa ; thful 
member, and that a copy be sent to The Mission 
Herald. 

MISS JENNIE WHITFIELD 
MTSS DORA MILLER 
MRS. J. C. SUTTTON 

Committee 



MARCH, 1935 



15 



"NUMBERED WITH THY SAINTS, IN GLORY 
EVERLASTING" 



At midnight, February 16th, 1935, Mrs. Williamson 
Pierre Smith, of St. Michael's Manor, Scotland, Md. 
entered into Life Eternal. 

Mrs. Smith was formerly Miss Rosa Wetmore of 
North Carolina. 



MISS SUE COLLIER 



I feel greatly privileged that the President of the 
Woman's Auxiliary asked me to express the deep 
regard in which they held Miss Sue Collier. We 
delight to honor her--" a woman who feareth the 
Lord, she shall be praised. Her own words praise 
her in the gates." 

We could speak of her gentleness and her aristo- 
cratic bearing, but I wish to tell of her beautiful 
life in the Church as I saw it. I am glad I sat where 
I could see her at every service. She sang 



"We love thine Altar, Lord, its mysteries revere, 
For there in faith adored, we find thy Presence near" 
She knelt there — each Sunday was a lesser Easter 
Day. She was there early. Eight o'clock for the 
four Sundays in the month, the fifty-two Sundays 
in the year. And during the fourteen years, I looked 
at her in the pew across from me I can recall only 
three or four times when she was not there. This 
applied to Sunday School and to the eleven o'clock 
service, and to all the other Sunday and many week 
day services. 

"One family we dwell in Him 
One Church above, beneath, 
Though now divided by the stream, 
The narrow stream of death." 

"0, blest communion, fellowship divine 
We feebly struggle, they in glory shine, 
Yet all are one in Thee for all are Thine. 

Alleluia." 
ELIZABETH M. CONE 



STATEMENT OF THE 



AMOUNTS PAID BY THE PARI SHES AVD MISSIONS FOR DIOCESAN 
CHURCH WORK, JAMARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31. 1935. 



Parishes 

Beaufort, St. Paul's 

Clinton, St. Paul's 

Fayetteville, St. John's 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 

Hope Mills, Christ Church 

Kinston, St. Mary's 

New Bern, Christ Church 

Red Springs, St. Stephen's 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' 

Southport, St. Philip's 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd . . 

Wilmington, St. James' 

Wilmington St. John's 

Wilmington, St. Paul's 



Organized Missions. 



Burgaw, St. Mary's . 
Faison, St. Gabriel's 
Lumberton, Trinity . 



Parishes 

Aurora, Holy Cross 

Ayden. St. James' 

Bath, St. Thomas' 

Belhaven, St. James' 

Bonnerton, St. John's 

Chocow.mty. Trinity . . 

Columbia, St. Andrew's 

Creswe'l, St. David's 

Fdenton, St. Paul's 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church 

Farmville, Emmanuel 

Gatesville, St. Mary's 

Greenville,. St. Paul's 

Grifton, St. John's 

Hamilton, St. Martin's 

Hertford, Holy Trinity ...... 

Jessama, Zion 

TjRjro I.-ndintr. St Oeoro-e's .. 
■Plymouth, Grace Church 

Roper, St. Luke's 

AVasNngton, St Peter's 

Wiliamston, Advent 

Windsor, St Thomas' 



Parishes 

Fayetteville, St. Joseph's 
New Bern, St. Cyprian's . . 
Wilmington, St. Mark's . . 



Organized Missions 



Belhaven. St. Mary's 

FMnntrm S* .Tob"-F'" 1 " '°list 
Fl'zabeth City, St. Philip's .. 

r ilrtsboro, St. Andrew's 

Kinston, St. Augustine's .... 
Washington, St. Paul's 



CONVOCATION OF 


Expec- 


Paid to 


tations 


Mar. 25th 


365.20 


$ 29.45 


50.00 




2,150.00 




1.000.00 


39.15 


60.00 


15.90 


1,000.00 


100.00 


2.125.00 


195.49 


55.00 


20.00 


200.00 




169.60 


18.01 


87i.40 


31.41 


9 781.50 


1,175 66 


2,031.60 


233.72 


1,200.00 


100.00 


35.00 


5.77 


65.00 


10.25 


174.00 


24.81 


CONVOCATION 


250.00 


14.00 


300.00 




35.00 




350.00 




100,00 


7.23 


100.00 




442.40 




700.15 




1,559 80 


200.00 


1,008.76 


86. ns 


23S.20 


65.00 


128.00 




1.356 20 


239.90 


2on.no 




65.00 




400.00 




100.00 




20n no 


15.00 


200.00 




75.00 


12.40 


1,500.00 


146.93 


100. on 


50.00 


225.00 




OCATION 


OF COLOR] 


104.00 




420 00 




140.00 




105.00 




l oi nn 


12.50 


20. lr. 




fio.no 




75.00 




120.00 


10.00 



WILMINGTON. 



North West, All Soul's 

Pikeville. St. George's . . . 
Trenton, Grace Church . . . 

Vanceboro, St. Pauls 

Whiteville, Grace Church . 
Wrighitsville, St. Andrews 

Unorganized Missions. 



Jasper, St. Thomas' 

Pollocksville, Mission 

Wilmington, Delgado Mission 



Parochial Missions. 

Campbellton. St. Philip's . . 
Tolar-Hart, Good Shepherd 



Total 



AND GENERAL 


Expec- 


Pa 


id to 


tations 


Mar. 


25th 


10.00 




1.01 


20.00 






15.00 






30.00 






100.00 




50.00 


6.00 






20.00 






20.00 






10.00 






25.00 






70.00 




7.00 


21,159.30 


$ 2,0 


56.73 



OF KDENTON 



Winton. St. John's 

Woodville, Grace Church 

Organized Missions 



Ahoskie. St. Thomas' 

Fairfield, All Saints'.. 

Murfreesboro, St. Barnabas' 

Roxobel. St. Mark's 

Sladesville, St. John's . . . 
Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' . 
Sunbury, St. Peter's ..... 
Swan Quarter, Calvarv . . . 
Winter-vine, St. Luke's . . . 
Yeatesville, St. Matthew's 

Unorganized Missions. 



Avoca, Holy Innocents' 
Camden, St. Joseph's . . 



Total $ 



Unorganized Missions. 

Aurora, St. Jude's 

Beaufort, St. Clement's 

Creenville, St. Andrew's 

Haddock's Cross Roads, St. Stephen's 

Roper. St. Ann's 

Wilmington, "Brooklyn" Mission... 
Wnghtsville, St. Augustine's 



43.00 

4" 

30.00 

30.00 

2 6.00 

20.00 

20.00 



100.00 


10.35 


150.00 


11.60 


55.00 




10.00 




30.00 




'92.08 




10.00 




100.00 




42.00 


13.96 


20.00 




125.00 


30.00 


20.00 




80.00 




10.00 




$ 10,477.59 


$ 903.05 



5.00 



Total $ 1,554.15 $ 

Grand Total $ 



27.50 



32, 99). 04 $ 2,987.28 



16. 



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MEETING OF 

ANNUAL 
CONVENTION 





The Fifty-Second Annual Con- 
vention of the Diocese of East 
Carolina will be held in St. Paul's 
Church, Beaufort, May 15, 16, 1935 

APRIL, 1935 







o 



v. 



A 



O 



V 



THE MISSION HERALD 



GET-TOGETHER MEETINGS— CONVOCATION 
OF WILMINGTON 



The Spring "Get-Together Meetings" will be held 
the latter part of April and through May. The Chair- 
men are planning helpful, inspiring programs. The 
Hostess Auxiliaries extend a most cordial welcome 
to all of our women, and are looking forward with 
much pleasure to having you meet with them. Will 
the Secretaries of each Parish Auxiliary send to the 
Secretary of the Hostess Auxiliary in her District, 
the number of women she may expect to attend 
from her Auxiliary. 

The District Meetings are as follows : 

District Number 1 : Wednesday, May 1st, Hostess 
Auxiliary, Christ Church, New Bern, N. C. Secre- 
tary, Mrs. Numa Nunn, 6 New Street, New Bern, N. 
C. Chairman to be elected at this meeting. 

District Number 2: Friday May 10th, Hostess Aux- 
iliary, Holy Innocents', Seven Springs, N. C. Secre- 
tary. Miss Julia Davis. Chairman to be elected at 
this meeting. 

District Number 10: Tuesday, April 23rd, Hostess 
Auxiliary, St. Paul's, Clinton, N. C. Secretary, Mrs. 
W. A. Smith, 311 Main Street, Clinton, N. C. Chair- 
man — Mrs. F. B. Johnson, Clinton, N. C. 

District Number 11 : Friday April 26th, Hostess 
Auxiliaries, St, John's, Fayetteville, N. C. Woman's 
Auxiliary and Young' Woman's Auxiliary. Secre- 
taries. Mrs. C. F. King, 234 Green Street, Fayette- 
ville, N. C. Mrs. T. M. Wooten, Fayetteville, N. C. 
Chairman, Mrs. S. L. Smith, Whiteville. N. 0. 

District Number 12: Wednesday, May 22nd, Hos- 
tess Auxiliary, St. John's, Wilmington, N. C. Secre- 
tary, Mrs. W. H. McClain, Box 791, Wilmington, N. 
C. Chairman, Mrs. J. Walter Williamson, Wilming- 
ton, N. C. 

These meetings will begin at 10:00 A. M. with a 
celebration of the Holy Communion. Further infor- 
mation will be sent to you by the District Chairman. 
Faithfully yours, 

ANN P. BECKWITH 
President of the Convocation of Wilmington 



A LETTER OF GENERAL INTEREST 



Wilmington, N. C. 
April 16, 1935. 
To the Diocesan Auxiliary Chairmen, 
Missions and Church Extension, 
in the Fourth Province. 

The following is from the "Minute" adopted by 
General Convention 1923: 

"The distinct and clear objective of the mission 



of the Church is to build up the body of Christ in 
the extension, enrichment and establishment of His 
Kingdom, to the end that the things which He began 
to do and teach may be perfected in the life of hu- 
manity." 

The above states definitely the purpose of the De- 
partment of Missions and Church Extension. 

We are asked at this time to think and pray and 
take part in a Forward Movement for deepening 
and strengthening of the spiritual life of the Church. 

The Forward Movement is a program of education 
presenting the needs and opportunities of the Church 
to her membership. This movement aims to revital- 
ize and invigorate the Cluireh's mission in Parish, 
Diocese and throughout the world and to develop a 
greater sense of responsibility on the part of every 
member of the Church for the sirpport of the whole 
program of the Church. 

As Auxiliary Chairman of the Department of Mis- 
sions and Church Extension in your Diocese, will yon 
cooperate in this movement and do all that you can 
1o further it? 

Copies of the enclosed leaflet. "Disciples of the 
Living' Christ," will probably be distributed in your 
Diocese. If not, they may be obtained from the 
Forward Movement, 223 West 7th Street, Cincinnati, 
Ohio. ($'1.00 per hundred postpaid). Will yon 
stress using the prayer on leaflet for this Forward 
Movement, also the Mid Day Prayer for Missions. 

The Presiding Bishop and the Forward Movement 
Commission ask that Pentecost be obsserved by a 
Church-wide Corporate Communion. "The gift 
given at Pentecost has never been recalled. Through- 
out the ages the Spirit waits to take possession of 
human hearts , ready to fill even the humbliest lives 
with Its Own Power of breath and flame. 

''Ask" — For a life of deeper spirituality that there 
may come a world-wide Pentecost. 

"Seek" — For a life of world service as Church 
members "that the world may believe." 
Most sincerely, 

(MRS. S. P.) LIB A M. ADAMS 

20 North Fifth Street 
Rep. on Department of Missions and Church Ex- 
tension, Fourth Province. 



MISSION AT DEI GADO MILL 



April 7-14. the Rev. Walter R. Noe, held a Mission 
at Delgado Mill. Wilmington, He was assisted in 
the services by Mr. Ashley T. St.Amand, layman-in 
charge and his wife, who is the organist of the Mis- 
sion. 



The Mission Herald 



VOLUME XLIX 



WILMINGTON, N. C, APRIL, 1935 



NUMBER i 



BISHOP'S LETTER 



My last letter closed with a report of my visits to 
■St. Paul's and St. John's Churches in Wilmington 
on Sunday, March 24th, and as so little time has 
elapsed since then, I have but few activities to report 
in this letter. 

On Wednesday, the 27th, at 5 :00 P. M., I had the 
privilege of speaking in the beautiful Chapel of St. 
Mary's School, Raleigh, and at 8 :00 P. M., I preached 
at the special Lenten service in Christ Church, Ra- 
leigh. My good friend, the Rev. Dr. Milton A. Bar- 
ber, could not be with me in the service as he was 
confined to his home by illness, but I have recently 
learned with much pleasure, that he is making a 
fine recovery. 

On Sunday, the 31st, at 11 :00 A. M., I instituted 
the Rev. Charles E. Williams as Rector of the Par- 
ish, preached and confirmed fifteen persons, present- 
ed by Mr. Williams, in Christ Church, New Bern. 

In the afternoon, accompanied by Mr. Williams, 
I went to St. Thomas' Church, Jasper, where I 
preached and presided at a meeting of the congre- 
gation. On the night of the 31st, I preachd and 
confirmed twenty-six persons, presented by the Rec- 
tor, Rev. Robert I. Johnson, in St. Cyprian's Church, 
New Bern. 

The youngest person in this fine class was eleven, 
and the oldest was eighty-three! One of those con- 
firmed was Cyprian Dillahunt, who was born in St. 
Cyprian's Church , when it was used as an Emer- 
gency Hospital following the great fire in New Bern 
thirteen years ago. Born, baptized and confirmed 
in St. Cyprian's, he has a right to be called "a child 
of the Church". 

On the night of AVednesday. April 3rd, I preached 
at a special Lenten service in St. John's Church, 
Fayetteville. 

On the afternoon of the 6th, I attended a meeting 
of the Students' Woman's Auxiliary in Friendly 
Hall, Greenville and made an address. 

Following the meeting of this fine and enthusi- 
astic group of future leaders, we had supper together 
in St. Paul's Parish House. It made my heart glad 
to know how splendidly our student work in Green- 
ville is being carried on under the fine leadership 
of the Rev. and Mrs. Worth Wicker, Miss Ellen 



Bowen and a group of earnest young women of St. 
Paul's Parish. 

On Sunday, the 7th, at 11 :00 A. M., I preached, 
confirmed three persons, presented by the Rector, 
Rev. Worth Wicker, and celebrated Holy Commun- 
ion in St. Paul's Church, Greenville. 

In the afternoon, I preached and confirmed six 
persons, presented by the Priest in Charge, Rev. 
James E. Holder, in our "truly rural" colored 
Mission, St. Stephen's, Haddock's Cross Roads, Pitt 
County. 

At night, I preached and confirmed seven persons, 
presented by the Priest in Charge, Rev. James E. 
Holder, in St. Augustine's Church, Kinston. 

My engagements for the remainder of the month 
are : 

St. Stephen's, Goldsboro on the 11th; St. James', 
and St. Mark's, Wilmington on Palm Sunday; The 
Church of the Good Shepherd, Wilmington on Easter 
Day; and St. John's and St. Joseph's, Fayetteville 
on the Sunday after Easter. AVhile in Fayetteville 
I am to have the privilege of participating in the 
Dedication of the attractive and churchly Post 
Chapel at Fort Bragg. 

Before I write my next letter to our diocesan 
family, the Fifty-Second Annual Convention of our 
diocese will have been held, and I trust that I will 
have had the pleasure of greeting my friends and 
fellow laborers from every church and mission in 
the diocese. 

Please join your prayers to mine that it may be 
a great Convention, great in attendance, great in 
interest, great in spirit, and above all great in the 
consciousness of God's presence and the manifesta- 
tion of His power. 

Faithfully and affectionately, 

Your friend and Bishop, 
THOMAS C. DARST 



The Rev. John Benners Gibble, former rector of 
the Church of the Good Shepherd, Wilmington and 
now a retired clergyman of the Diocese, has received 
many calls for his services during the past few weeks. 
He held services in the Church of the Good Shepherd, 
Raleigh on Palm Sunday; assisted in a celebration 
of the Holy Communion in St. James', Wilmington 
on Maundy Thursday Night and held the morning 
service in St. Paul's, Clinton on Easter Day. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



FOR WARD MOVEMENT in the Great Fifty Days 



BETWEEN EASTER AND WHITSUNDAY 



BY THIS TIME, every loyal and earnest memher of the 'Church should be familiar with the Forward 
Movement of the Church, its purpose and objectives. Its first objective was Easter, and its training- 
ground the Forty Days of Lent. If the clergy have carried out the first direction of its leaders, every 
member of the Church has received 'the Manual on "Discipleship", put out by the Commission appointed 
by the General Convention, and has been using it, With Easter we reach the second stage of the Move- 
ment— THE CHURCH IN UNITED ACTION. What that means is clearly set forth in a folder written 
to the clergy by one. of our bishops from the field, under the title : 

CARRYING THE RESURRECTION INTO GALILEE 



The Forward Movement's Easter Challenge 



"A fellow by the name of Rowan." Do you re- 
call him? He was the man in the Spanish- American 
war who did a life and death business for his coun- 
try. This "fellow by the name -of Rowan" landed 
in the dead of night on the coast of Cuba, plunged 
into an enemy-infested jungle, and delivered "A 
Message to Garcia.'' Elbert Hubbard immortalized 
Rowan, and big business printed and circulated by 
the millions "A Message to Garcia". 

Every Churchman has a message this Eastertide 
a thousand times more thrilling than "A Message 
to Garcia." It is the Carrying of the Message of the 
Diving and Victorious Christ into Galilee! It is 
there in the Gospels. It is surely the most vivid, 
the most soul-satisfying incident in the Easter Story. 
Who can conjecture what the Resurrection would 
have been without the Galilean ending? For the 
carrying of the Resurrection into Galilee meant car- 
rying it home. We know what we mean when we 
speak of "bringing a truth home." Well, Galilee 
was home to the first disciples. It was in that home 
they first saw Jesus. It was from Galilee they 
started out to follow Him, "And Jesus Returned in 
the Power of the Spirit into Galilee, and There Went 
Out a Fame of Him." Ah. yes; there was a fame; 
but friends and neighbors cautioned those first fol- 
lowers against that fame. It might lead to trouble, 
to disaster, to death. And they did find the way 
hard. And at last "They Followed, But They Were 
Afraid." Then came the day which we call Good 
Friday — the day in which Evil did the worst it had 
ever done, and in which God did the best that He 
had ever done. And God won. But these Galileans 
far from home, horribly afraid, did not know that. 
God had won. They did not know it until Easter 
Morning. Then they knew. And the dawn was 
full of the racing feet of joy! 

It is not long from dawn till noon, yet by noon 



their joy had died. Disillusioned, they walk dusty 
roads, and say : "We Trusted That it Had Been He. . . 
But Now! ..." In loneliness, in fear, in that great 
hostile city, betrayed by their Galilean brogue, they 
shoot the door-bolts and bar the windows. It is 
almost perfectly expressed in Celia Thaxter's words : 
"Good-bye, sweet day ! 

I have so loved thee, but cannot, cannot hold thee. 

Departing like a dream, the shadows fold thee; 
Slowly thy perfect beauty fades away • 
Good-bye, sweet day!" 

But it was not good-bye, sweet day ! And it was 
Galilee that saved that Day! For they remembered 
His saying: "After I Am Risen Again, I Will Go Be- 
fore You into Galilee." They remembered it, they re- 
joiced in it, they cried it above their fears, "Go 
Quickly, and tell His Disciples that He is Risen From 
the Dead, and, Behold, He Goeth Before You Into 
Galilee, There Shall Ye See Him." 

Brethren, this is what the second pamphlet of 
the Forward Movement is trying to say. It is ap- 
pealing to a million "fellows by the name of Rowan" 
to carry The Message of the Living Christ into 
the Galilee of Men's Hearts! It would have that 
which draws "from out the boundless deep" of 
Easter "turn again home." Do we fear a "post- 
Easter slump? So they feared, until they took the 
Resurrection into Galilee. There the Truth "went 
home." There they were justified in those friends 
who had prophesied disaster. There the Risen Life 
pulsated in their prayers; warmed their fisher huts; 
radiated the home life of their wives and children; 
called to them from the shore: "Come and dine!" 
It is not mysticism ; it is not allegorv; it is not para- 
ble. The Tmmortal Truth will always be Truth, 
but it will not be True for us until it is carried 
into '"he Galilee of the heart' 

So Forward March is sounded again in the "Dis- 



APRIL, 1935 



ciples of the Living; Christ." Will you take the 
pamphlet and use it? Will you see to it that your 
people use it, Will you. for the "incorruptible 
crown" of the Living- Christ do what "a fellow by 
the name of Rowan" did for the "corruptible crown" 
of his country? Will you help, and enlist helpers, 
in Carrying the Message to Galilee? 

The "Disciples of the Living Christ" pamphlet 
will help us to do it. It will help us in the Church. 
It will help us in the Home Life. It will help us 
in our prayers. It will help us to make friends, 
and to love our enemies into friendship. It will help 
us win the nn-churched. It will keep us from the 
"reproach of that Clad New Morning" — the re- 
proach of the "Easter slump" — the reproach of 
leaving the saving Truth of our Christendom shut 
up with the lilies and the lights and the anthems ! 
It will company with us through "the great Forty 
Days". And it will be from this Galilee of our 
hearts that we shall go to the upper room of Whit- 
sunday, and hear amazed voices crying: "Behold, 
Are not These Which Speak Galileans? And How 
Hear We Every Man in Our Own Tongue . . . the 
Wonderful Works of God!" 



THOMPSON ORPHANAGE NOTES 



BISHOP'S APPOINTMENTS FOR MAY 



May 4 District Meeting, Y. P. S. L.— St. Thomas', 
Bath, 10:30 A. M. 
5 St. Peter's Church, Washington, 11:00 
A. M. 
Church of The Advent, Williamston. 8:00 
P.M. 

10 St. Barnabas' Church, Murfreesboro, 4:00 

P. M. 
St. Thomas' Church, Ahoskie, 8:00 P. M. 

11 District Meeting, Y. P. S. L., Holy Trinity, 

Hertford, .10:30 A. M. 

12 St. Mary's Church, Gatesville, 11 :00 A. M. 
St. Peter's Church, Sunbury, Afternoon 
St. John's Church, Winton, 8 :00 P. M. 

14 Meeting of Executive Council, St. Paul's, 
Beaufort, 9 :00 P. M. 
15 — 16 Diocesan Convention, St. Paul's Beaufort 
19 Holy Innocents', Lenoir County, 11 :00 
A. M. 
District Meeting, Y. P. S. L., Afternoon 
22 Will preach sermon at the one hundredth 
anniversary of my first Parish, Christ 
Church, Fairmont. W. Va. 
26 St. Philip's Ghurch, Southport, 1 1 :00 A. M. 



Big League Base Ball 
In the Spring the young boys fancy enthusiasti- 
cally turns to thoughts of base ball. Understanding 
this, our very good friend, Mr. Erwin A. Holt of 
Burlington, arranged with his friend Mr. "Connie 
Mack" owner of the Philadelphia Athletics to let 
all of our boys; including the Superintendent, wit- 
ness, free of charge, one of the ball games between 
the Athletics and the Syracuse Chiefs, during the 
recent visit of these two teams to Charlotte. Mr. 
Holt was in Charlotte that day and also witnessed 
the game, which was a close one, Syracuse winning 
by a score of 3-2. Our boys rooted hard for the A's, 
but even the redoubtable Jimmy Foxx was unable to 
connect for a hit. However the game was much 
enjoyed and all appreciated greatly the kindness of 
Mr. Holt and Mr. Connie Mack. 



The Tri-State Orphanage Conference 

On April 24-25 the Thompson Orphanage is looking 
forward to entertaining the Orphanage representa- 
tives from the States of North and South Carolina, 
Georgia, with usually a few from Virginia and some- 
times from Alabama, a representative or two. 

The program as outlined presents a number of 
topics of compelling interest and the meetings should 
prove to be helpful and instructive. 



The Annual Convention of the Woman's Auxiliary 
The Convention of the Woman's Auxiliary of the 
Diocese of North Carolina is to meet at St. Peter's 
Church on April 25-26 and we are hoping that many 
of the delegates can find time to visit the Orphanage, 
during their stay in Charlotte. A most cordial in- 
vitation is extended. Many of the delegates have 
boys and girls at the Orphanage whom they are 
clothing. They ought not to return home without 
a glimpse of their wards. 



The Clothing Boxes 

A great many splendid boxes of clothing have 
already been received and we hope letters of thanks 
have been sent in all cases. Sometimes one fails 
to be acknowledged for one reason or another, and 
when this happens we are greatly embarrassed and 
troubled. Please do not hesitate to notify us if you 
do not get a prompt acknowledgment of the receipt 
of your box. The Orphanage is so grateful for the 
help given in clothing the children. I wish to voice 
the love and appreciation of the children and their 
best wishes to you all for a blessed Eastertide. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



A Supreme Court Justice Looks at the Sunday School 



AFTER WATCHING A GRIM PROCESSION FILE PAST HIS BENCH FOR TWENTY-EIGHT YEARS 



By the Hon. Lewis L. Fawcett, Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New York 



(Reprinted by permission of the Sunday School Times) 



"My downward career started when I stopped 
going to Sunday School," said an eighteen-year-old 
murderer. "I do not know what the inside of a 
church looks like," replied another, when asked what 
her religion was. Justice Fawcett has had to dispose 
of several thousand cases involving matrimonial trou- 
bles, and "'not in a single case." he says, "were both 
parties to the suit active church members." These 
are only a few of the many startling facts in this 
remarkable article. It will encourage superinten- 
dents, teachers, and pastors to persevere against all 
odds, thanking God that they may have a part m 
keeping our young people out of a life of crime. 



It takes whole pages in the daily press to recount 
the crimes of racketeers, gunmen, gangsters, and 
other enemies of society of the evening before. 

Statistics show that fourscore and five years ago 
the United States was the most law-abiding of the 
nations. Now it is the most lawless country on earth. 

The crime reports which the Department of Justice 
at Washington issues quarterly show the nation's 
crime bill to be $1-3,000,000,000 a year; 140,000 Amer- 
icans are in prison, and 400,000 persons are regularly 
engaged in criminal activities. Last year 40,000 
homes and other places were burglarized and more 
than $300,000,000 was lost through incendiary fires; 
100,000 persons were assaulted, and 50,000 robbed. 
There were 554 hold-ups and a loss of $3,384,000. 
An inhabitant of the United States is murdered every 
forty-five minutes. Last year the homicide rate was 
10.7 per 100.000, or about 12,000 persons murdered- - 
the highest rate in the civilized world. The annual 
murder rate has increased 350 per cent since 1890. 
Startling as these figures are, and paradoxical as it 
may seem, there is no crime wave in this country. 
The statistics do not make it a crime wave, because 
there is nothing new about them 

When Thear Downfall Began 

During my experience of more than twenty-eight 
years on the bench, I have passed sentence on over 
8.000 persons convicted of crime. Very few were 
members of or attendants at any church or Sunday 
School. However, the evil-doer realizes the impor- 
tant relation of the church to society and turns to it 



for help when in danger of being deprived of his 
liberty. 

In 1910 Stanislaw Pettanza and Maria Rappa were 
indicted charged with kidnapping Joseph Longo 
and Michael Rizzo, who were held for $30,000 ransom. 
During the trial of Pettanza, the pastor of a church 
testified that the gang insisted he make an effort to 
help him in the case. Maria Rappa, after conviction, 
when asked her religion, responded: "I do not know 
What the inside of a church looks like." 

Abe Lewis, noted gang leader, was convicted of 
robbery. A rabbi called and told me that members 
of the Lewis gang threatened to kill him if he did not 
make an appal for clemency for Lewis. 

An attorney, convicted of forgery, said before 
going to prison, "My downfall commenced when I 
left the church." 

A youth of eighteen years, convicted of murder, 
said, "My downward career started when I stopped 
going to Sunday School." 

Scores of young men convicted of crime have de- 
clared the first fatal step toward ruin was leaving 
Sunday School. No child can have a fair American 
chance without religion. -Children cannot have too 
much education based on the plain teachings of Jesus. 

The total crime bill in this country annually is over 
$13,000,000,000 in money and a value in ruined lives 
far beyond all possible computation. It would cost 
many times that if the churches were closed. There 
Avould be a carnival of crime loose in the land. Black- 
handers, white-slavers, highwaymen, burglars, biga- 
mists, and the habitues of the underworld are un- 
churched. 

The records of the civil courts also furnish abun- 
dant proof of the value of the church to society. 
This is especially true of the Matrimonial Court, In 
the several thousand cases disposed of by me, not 
in a single case were both parties to the suit active 
church members, and in the maiority of cases, neither 
attended any church. Invariably the guilty party 
did not go to any church. The divorce evil in the 
United States is growing at an alarming rate. The 
absence of religion in the home means the loss of one 
of the strongest ties that bind men and women to- 
gether in marital bliss. A religious home is a happy 



APRIL, 1935 



home. Divorce, crime, and juvenile delinquency all 
bear striking testimony that society 'is carrying its 
broken homes and the burden of criminality because 
of the lack of religious training in the home, the 
school, and the church. 

19-Year-Old Veterans of Crime 
The growing increase of juvenile criminality is 
proof of a deterioration of character and an indict- 
ment against the home, the parents, and the schools. 
It is a breakdown in the moral and religious educa- 
tion of the young. The ideals of youth have been 
lowered.. We must bear in mind that public schools 
used to start the day with some words of Christian 
guidance. That beneficial uplift has been discon- 
tinued. If religion is good one day in the week, it 
is good every day. The majority of .crimes in the 
past ten years have been committed by those under 
twenty-one years of age. For the past two years 
more nineteen -year-olds were arrested than any other 
age group. The 4,548 arrests in this group the first 
six months of last year included more than a hun- 
dred charged with homicide. 

The gang on the corner is often the starting place 
of a criminal career. But the right kind of gang 
is helpful to keep the boys straight. We are gre- 
garious. It is natural for us to flock together. We 
join groups for play, for social intercourse, and for 
work. School and college societies, clubs and or- 
ganizations of various kinds, are a phase of gangdom 
of the beneficial sort. The all-important thing is to 
keep the young from joining the wrong gang and 
away from vicious contacts. Church clubs and pro- 
perly supervised groups and organized play keep 
boys from wrongdoing and away from evil com- 
panions. 

More than 4,000 of the 8,000 prisoners sentenced 
by me were under the age of twenty-one years, and 
only three were members of Sunday School, at the 
time of committing their crimes. That satisfies me 
of the value of the Sunday School to the community 
in helping safeguard it from the growth of criminals. 
It also satisfies me of the value to the individual. 

In 1,092 cases of suspended sentence, in each of 
which a minister, rabbi or priest became interested, 
at my request, with the hope of saving the boy to a 
future life of usefulness and good citizenship, only 
sixty-two of the boys were brought back for violation 
of the conditions of the parole. I believe the reform 
in the remaining cases, over 1,000, was prompt and 
permanent. 

Dikes against an Ominous Tide 
T regard our Sunday Schools and churches as the 
only effective means to stem the rising tide of vice 



and crime among youth. Society carries the heavy 
burden of criminality chiefly because of the lack of 
religious training of the youth. I believe religious 
training of children should be the start of their edu- 
cation. If all the children were kept under the in- 
fluence of the Sunday Schools and the church during 
their teens — the formative period of their lives — and 
all grown-ups would take an active interest in church 
work, we would soon be closing prisons and jails 
instead of building more. It is my opinion that the 
tide of crime is likely to grow until this important 
problem is dealt with at the source. 

The Sunday School is the mightiest organization 
in the world for good. 

There is no more potent influence in the life of the 
youth of this country than the Sunday School. 

The Sunday School is the best preparation for 
happiness and success. We cannot do without the 
Sunday School. 

The real value of the Sunday School is irrefutably 
attested by the great and good everywhere. Let 
me quote some testimony of a few celebrities on the 
value of Sunday School instruction: 

Former President Hoover: "The Sabbath School 
is at the very root of the religious life, with all its 
benefits to the individual and the nation, and for 
this reason I cordially commend all efforts to enlarge 
its field of usefulness." 

The late President Coolidge : "The Sunday Schools 
furnish a great agency by which spiritual ideals are 
made a part of life of the younger generation of the 
people of the United States, and the growth of such 
schools is of inestimable value in providing a higher 
type of citizenship." - 

David Lloyd George, formerly Premier of England: 
"All that I am, and whatever I have accomplished, 
I owe to the Sunday School." 

It is the duty of parents to send their children to 
Sunday School, and, if necessary in order to get 
them there, to take them, for every child is entitled 
to know Cod. Religious education should supple- 
ment all public school education, and there should be 
character education. Children should be taught that 
the great objective in life is the development of 
character. 

This country needs the sort of New Deal that will 
hr\ng about a Recovery in Moral and Spiritual Val- 
ues. There are 17,000.000 boys and girls in this 
country growing up without moral training from 
any source. There are 19,000,000 persons enlisted 
in the Sunday School ranks in the United States. If 
every member of this army of Christians would do 
(Continued to Page 15) 



THE MISSION HERALD 



The Mission Herald 

ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 

Published Monthly except July and August at 

507 Southern Building 
WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor 

REV. WALTER R. NOE 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 

RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 

MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 
Advertising rates furnished on application. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to receive 
their papers, should promptly notify the Business Man- 
ager, giving when necessary, both the old and new ad- 
dress. 



ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION 



The Committee has arranged an unusually inter- 
esting Program for the Celebration of the 20th Anni- 
versary of Bishop Darst's Consecration during the 
meeting of the Annual Convention to be held in St. 
Paul's Church, Beaufort, May 15th. Bishop Penick 
of the Diocese of North Carolina has been secured 
as the speaker. The Rev. O. A. Ashby of St. Paul's, 
Edenton and Rev. W. H. Milton, D. D., of St. James', 
Wilmington, will be on the Program. The Holy 
Communion will be celebrated by Bishop Darst. The 
service will begin at 10:3.0 A. M. 



PEOPLE OF DIOCESE INVITED 

The people of the Diocese and other friends of the 
Bishop are invited to be present for the Anniversary 
Celebration and to stay through the afternoon session 
of the Convention or at least until four o'clock in 
the afternoon. Arrangements will be made for more 
than a thousand people to hear the service and it is 
hoped that every parish and mission will make a 
special effort to be represented by a large number 
of their people. 



DELEGATES TO THE CONVENTION 



A special effort is being made this year, on ac- 
count of the Anniversary Celebration and other im 
portant matters to come before the Convention, to 
secure representation from each parish and mission 



of the Diocese. Each parish and mission is request- 
ed to send a full delegation, if possible, and to see 
that at least one delegate is present during the 
whole session of the Convention. 



THE FORWARD MOVEMENT 



The Presiding Bishop says: "Forward Movement 
means acting with the Living Christ. It means His 
Easter Life applied to every relationship. It means 
Christ-imparted energy overcoming the dead weight 
of disaster." May we Go Forward with Him during 
the Great Fifty Days from Easter to Pentecost. 



MUSICAL VESPERS IS WELL ATTENDED 



A large audience, including a number of out-of- 
town people, heard the choir of St. Stephen's Epis- 
copal Church and several other Goldsboro musicians 
in an enjoyable presentation of musical vespers 
Sunday afternoon. The program was a part of the 
Church's Palm Sunday observance. 

Vocal and orcan solos, double trio numbers and 
hymns by the congregation made up the well-rounded 
program, which opened with the organ prelude by 
Mrs. H. C. Selby. 

Following a processional hymn and prayer, Mrs. 
Lawrence Bradsher sang "O, Divine Redeemer, '* 
which was followed by "There Is A Green Hill," 
sung by the double trio composed of Mesdames Cas- 
tex, Morris. Berkeley, Royall, Graham and Pai'ker. 
Mrs. Georgia Lee Bynnm played an organ solo, 
"Lento", which was followed by an anthem and a 
solo, "The Palms," by Fred Phipps. 

The double trio sans- "I Waited for the Lord." 
Offertory, benediction and recessional hymn were 
folloAved by tlie organ postlnde by Mrs. H. C. Selby, 
bringing the program to a close. 



MUSICAL VESPERS 



Mrs. H. C. Selby, Organist 



Oman Prelude, Mrs. H. C. Selby; Prayers; Solo 
"O Divine Redeemer" — Gounod, Mrs. Lawrence 
Bradsher; Double Trio "There is a Green Hill"-- 
Gounod, Mesdames Castex, Morris. Berkeley, Royall, 
Graham and Parker; Organ Solo "Lento" — Cyril 
Scbttt, Mrs. Georgia Lee Bynum : Anthem "The Lord 
is My Shepherd"— MacFarren: Solo "The Palms"— 
Fa are'. Mr. Fred Phipps; Double Trio "I Availed for 
the Lord"— Mendelssohn, Mesdames Berkeley. Cas- 
tex. Morris, Royall, Graham and Parker; Offertory; 
Benediction: Recessional Hymn "Rejoice Ye Pure 
in Heart"; Organ Postlude, Mrs. H. C. Selby. 



APRIL. 1935 



THE FIFTY-SECOND ANNUAL CONVENTION 
OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 



PROGRAM 



11:45 A. M. 
12 :15 P. M, 



1 :00 P. M.- 
2:00 P. M.- 

2:30 P. M.- 



St. Paul's Church, Beaufort, N. C. 
Tuesday, May 14th 
8:30 P. M— Meeting of the Executive Council. 

Wednesday, May 15th 

10:00 A. M. — Organization of the Convention. 
10:30 A. M. — Celebration of the Holy Communion 

and Anniversary Sermon by Rt. Rev. 

Edwin A. Penick, D. D., Bishop of 

North Carolina. 

(The clergy Avill vest for this service.) 
-Address by Rev. C. A. Ashby. 
-Presentation of a Plan of the Anni- 
versary Committee by Rev. W. H. Mil- 
ton, D. D., and responses from dele- 
gates and visitors. 
-Luncheon. 
-Annual Address of the Bishop of the 

Diocese 
-Business Session (See Rules of Order"). 

Committee on Elections. 

Committee on New Parishes. 

Standing Committee. 

Examining Chaplains. 

Treasurer. 

Deportment of Finance. 

Committee on Canons. 

Committee on Unfinished Business. 

Committee on State of the Church. 

Trustees of the Diocese 

Trustees of the University of the Sotith 

Other Special Committees. 

Other Reports. 

Motions and Resolutions 
8.00 P. M. — Mass Meeting. Address on the God's 

Acre Plan by Rev. E, R. Neff. 

Five-minute addresses on the follow- 
in q subjects : 

Rural Work in a New Field, by Rev. 

John W. Hardy. 

Rural Work in an Established Field, 

bv Rev. J. Leon Malone. 

City Missionary Work, by Rev. E, C. 

McConnell. 

Thursday, May 16th 
7:30 A. M. — Celebration of the Holy Communion 

in St. Paul's Church. 
10:00 A. M. — Business Session. . 
1 :00 P. M.— -Luncheon. 



2 :30 P. M. — Business Session or Meeting of Exec- 
utive Council. 
Among the important things to come before the 
Convention are: 

1. Celebration of the 20th Anniversary of the 
Consecration of Bishop Darst. 
Plan of Anniversary Committee. 
The Annual Address of the Bishop. 
Election of Delegates to the Provincial Synod. 
Consideration of the suggested change in Can- 
on 14, section 1. 
The Forward Movement. 
Report, of Finance Department. 
Report of Executive Council. 



6. 



8. 



Y. P. S. L. DISTRICT MEETINGS 



The Young People's Service Leagues of the Docese 
of East Carolina will hold their annual District 
Meetings on the following dates and at the following 
places: 

DISTRICT I — which includes the following coun- 
ties — New Hanover. Brunswick, Hoke, Pender, Samp- 
son, Cumberland. Robeson, Bladen, and Columbus. 

This district holds its meeting at St. Paul's Church, 
Clinton on Saturday, April 27, beginning at 10:30 
A. M. 

DISTRICT HI— Which includes the folloAving 
counties — Pitt, Martin, Washington, Tyrrell, Beau- 
fort, Hyde, and Dare. 

This District holds its meeting at St. Thomas' 
Church, Bath, on Saturday, May 4. beginning at 
10:30 A.M. 

DISTRICT IV— which includes the following 
counties — Chowan, Perquimans, Gates, Pasquotank, 
Hertford, Bertie, Currituck, Camden. 

This district holds its meeting at Trinity Church, 
Hertford, on Saturday, May 11, beginning at 10:30 
A. M 

DISTRICT II — which includes the following conn- 
ties — Lenoir, Wayne, Greene, Jones, Craven, Cartai'- 
et, Pamlico, Duplin, and Onslow. 

This District holds its meeting at Holy Tnnocents' 
Church, Seven Springs, on SUNDAY. May 19. 
Please take note of the fact that District II holds its 
meeting on Sunday instead of on Staurday as is the 
custom. This is the date of Bishop Darst 's annual 
visit to this parish, thus giving the young people of 
this district the privilege of hearing him. 

— The Searchlight. 



The Rev. Walter R. Noe, Executive Secretary of 
the Diocese, celebrated the Holy Communion and 
preached in St. James', Belhaven. on Easter Day. 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD 



THE QUEST FOR SECURITY" 



By Dr. Joseph R. Sizoo, Minister, New York Avenue 
Presbyterian Church, Washington, D. C. 



Collossians 3:3. 
'Your life is hid with Christ in God." 



The one thing this world craves above all other 
things is the sense of security. The nameless, inde- 
finable longing of life for safety. Behind the tempo 
and tension of unrest ; behind modern discontent and 
disillusionment ; behind the spirit of revolt and revo- 
lution, is the feeling that we are no longer secure. 
Suddenly we have discovered that life is vulnerable 
and the world can get at us. We are becoming tired 
of being tossed about by the storms and are seeking 
some haven behind whose breakwater we shall be 
free from the beating of the winds. We seem like 
people who walk on streets which have no foundation, 
who live in houses which do not shelter, who eat 
food which does not satisfy. Our generation is like 
some fussy old maid suffering her first illness, for- 
ever rushing about for a thermometer to take her 
temperature. 

Most non-fiction literature of our day turns on 
this theme. What endless books are being written 
on the questions: Where are we going and what 
can we know about the way? There are a few in 
our generation who agree with H. G. Wells that this 
may be the best possible world, but Spengler speaks 
the mind of untold multitudes who seemingly think 
that this confused world has but little hope. Every- 
thing is in a flux and yet everywhere men seek a 
stillness. We are quite willing to admit that we 
have made a bad job of it all. The consciousness 
that, we have made a mess of life haunts our genera- 
tion. We are not quite sure that we can muddle 
through much longer. We seem to disagree on what 
Ave want. For every difficulty we meet we have 
many programs and cures. We talk a great deal 
of a planned society and while our generation may 
believe it needs a plan, we seemingly cannot agree 
what that plan shall be. But behind all plans and 
programs is this haunting desire for security. We 
long for a place where impatience shall be subdued, 
where temper shall be restrained, where the pools 
are never ruffled, where the waters are not muddy 
and where all tension vanishes. All confidence is 
gone. The vaunted boasting of some years past has 
vanished. We are no longer proud of our accom- 
plishments. The last vestige of our boasted <rrent- 
ness has been shattered We have suddenly 



awakened to find ourselves unprepared. The long- 
ing for safety haunts our modern world. 

"I slumber not 

The thorn is in my couch. 

Each day the trumpet soundeth in my ear, 

It is the echo of my heart." 
We yearn for some sound-proof, panic-proof 
chamber where the wicked cease from troubling 
and the weary are at rest. We long to put our feet 
upon a rock that cannot be moved, to live in a house 
that will not fall with the storm, to eat food that 
will not turn to ash. The cry of our world is for 
something to which it may run as in childhood we 
ran into the outstretched arms of a mother's love 
when danger and fear took hold of us. The name- 
less longing of our generation is for a depth so 
deep, a height so inaccessible and a distance so 
great that nothing can reach it. 

What is more, we must find that security if we 
are to play our part. There can be no courageous 
facing of the facts of life until this panic of insecur- 
ity is washed away. The feeling of uncertainty 
always robs life of its best and highest. It disap- 
points hope, compromises initiative and leads to 
cowardly surrenders. 

■W flP TP •)(• "S" 

Sometimes this quest expresses itself in the search 
for political security. It is strange how emphases 
shift with the passing years. When the war was on. 
the watch-cry of the decade was, "making the world 
safe for democracy." Today, strangely enough, 
nothng is safe in the world — not even democracy. 
And what is still more significant, we do not greatly 
care whether or no democracy is safe. Our genera- 
tion is not greatly concerned about the character of 
the government under which it lives. The cry for 
freedom falls on closed ears. Years ago our fathers 
fought and bled that liberty might not perish and 
that the ideals of a democratic government might be 
maintained. That is not ^o today. The cry of our 
generation is not for political freedom, but for 
political security. We will rrladly sj'ive up any form 
of government, toss into the discard any conviction 
of the past, scran any theory of national life, so oniv 
t^e guarantee of safety may come. There is no great 
interest in a government that snnrantees personal 
libertv. What we sceminglv want is a p'overnment 
that giiarantees security. Nations no longer cry 
for a place in the sun. With but few exceptions 
Ihev are satisfied to hold what they have. 

F"or the most part, jrovernments hope to obtain 
this political security bv peaceful means. The we<ro- 
ons of statecraft are beins>- sharpened today. Diplo 
mats are rusHn<r about fran^icallv in the guise of 



APRIL, 1935 



11 



social engagements, making furious efforts to main- 
tain for their nations the assurance of safety. Be- 
hind treaties, conferences, protocols, secret alliances, 
nnder-cover arrangements, and gentlemen's agree- 
ments, is the quest for security. Each nation is 
attempting to get as much as possible by giving as 
little as possible. In each instance the stake in diplo- 
matic procedure today is security. 

Where peaceful methods fail, mankind is not un- 
AvWling to resort to arms. The leaders of nations 
are not at all willing to outlaw war. The mad haste 
of nations to the increase of armament, the build- 
ing of larger fleets, the making of bombs and ar- 
mored planes, the building of fortifications and ca- 
nals — all these bear witness to the determination 
of nations to make themselves secure. It will never 
come by that course. The last war taught the pitiful 
lesson of the inadequacy of armament to national 
security, but seemingly the world has not learned 

the lesson. 

# # # # # 

Sometimes this quest finds expression in the search 
for economic security. Many new and unfamiliar 
words are being spoken by the leaders of the new 
world. Strange phrases are being coined and a 
new language is coming into daily use. One won- 
ders if mankind is not suffering from the illusion 
that the making of a new vocabulary will make a 
new world. As if parading unfamiliar words will 
change the order of things! Words like social jus- 
tice, exploitation, economic determinism, rugged in- 
dividualism, are being tossed off rather lightly today. 
But behind all these is the indefinable longing for 
economic security. 

Here and there you will meet some rare prophet 
of the dawn with his face toward the sunrise who 
cries out for the more abundant life, believing that 
man must come to a finer and fuller expression of 
living, that childhood shall have a fairer chance at 
life, that homes shall be more comfortable and 
joyous, that grievous burdens shall be taken from 
the backs of men, that cultural appreciations with 
libraries and galleries and symphonies shall be 
placed within the reach of all, that adequate housing 
shall supplant the dark alley tenements, that schools 
shall be multiplied and that a gladder wav of life 
shall be the experience of all. There are those rare 
spirits who envisage all that for mankind and hero- 
ically propose to rebuild civilization to such a pro- 
gram. But as a matter of fact, most people of the; 
world are quite indifferent to it all. What men 
want is the assurance that they will be able to work 
tomorrow, that they will have bread enough for 
their families, that emolovment shall be reasonably 



certain, that in old age they shall not travel the road 
to the poorhouse and that in death they shall not be 
carried to a paupers grave. It is economic security 
that men want today. 



■M. Jfc Jfa Jfc Jfc 



Sometimes this quest finds expression in the search 
for religious security. I need not tell you what 
religious unsettlement there is among us. What 
groping there is in our modern world for reality ! 
What reaching out after these eternal things which 
seem to be slipping through our fingers! Frankly, 
many people are anxious about religion. They are 
fearful lest the faith with which they were brought 
up shall prove inadequate and false. Many have 
fallen upon crass unbelief and in place of a vibrant 
faith there is the sneer of the cynic. If you sit down 
with these people and ask them why they have come 
to this regrettable denial, they are quite unable to 
give you the reason. They do not know how it has 
come about or what has happened. But somehow 
they have come to feel that they can no longer be- 
lieve in God as men believed in Him long ago. They 
have a vague feeling that the Bible is not the reliable 
and authoritative book of religion that men in the 
past have held it to be. They are not sure that in 
Jesus Christ is the hope of the world and that the 
redemption of mankind is by the cross of the Son 
of God. Men today are disturbed, fearful that all 
these things may not be true and that prayer has no 
longer the power that it had for them when they 
kneeled at their mother's knee to chant some child- 
hood pater noster. And what is more, they do not 
want to make the venture or study it through for 
themselves. It is a significant fact that while our 
forefathers were concerned with religious freedom, 
our generation only seeks religious security. One 
of the amazing trends of our day is the revival of the 
religion of Rome. No church can claim so many 
conversions from the cultural and intellectual world. 
The literary agnostics like Hillaire Belloc and Ches- 
terton, are symbolic of that large group who have 
turned to the Church of Rome for their religious 
appreciations. When you try to analyze that in- 
contestable drift you discover that they are tired of 
being tossed about. They have no longer the heart 
to seek and search for themselves. They throw 
themselves rather upon those who will guarantee 
their life in this world and in the world to come. 
They are tired of being tossed about by the storms 
of uncertainty. They yearn for some quiet and 
sequestered harbor where winds cannot reach them 
and Avhere all is peace. It is the quest for religious 
security. 

Such is the world in which we live. The cry of 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD 



the human heart is for security. Over the broken 
waves of the sea of life there comes the age-old 
yearning', "Oh that I knew where I might find Him." 

w w flp IP "IF 

Where shall men find that security? How can 
the human heart obtain this peace it seeks! What 
has the religion of Jesus to say to the world in such 
an hour? 

There have been times when' the human heart has 
searched for security by a withdrawal from the 
world. Men supposed that they could find peace by 
dwelling apart like a hermit soul in some fellowless 
firmament. Long ago a Hebrew poet spoke for 
them: "Oh that I had wings like a dove, then I 
would fly away and be at rest." It was the at- 
tempt to find safety by withdrawing from the world 
and holding oneself aloof from life. The Hindu 
expressed it in the doctrine of Nirvana. In the 
medieval centuries it found expression in convents 
and the monastic life. It was an attempt to run 
away from reality and avoid an honest facing of 
life as it is. While it was done in the name of re- 
ligion, surely it was not the religion of Jesus. There 
is nothing heroic about that philosophy for it soon 
issues into crass selfishness and unconcern. Today 
there is that same attempt to secure peace by running 
away from reality and avoiding the issues of life. 
The escapist philosophy is not unfamiliar today. 
There is often the attempt to close one's eyes to the 
faicts of life, in the hope that out of sight is out of 
mind. 

But you cannot run away from life ; you can no 
more run away from life than you can escape your 
shadow. It is futile to throw yourself back into 
oblivion. God put us in this world to play our part 
and it is sheer cowardice to refuse to meet life be- 
cause it is difficult. The challenge of the religion of 
Jesus is always, "Launch out into the deep, let 
down your ne's." Belter pilot a ship that faces 
the storms and comes at last, though battered and 
brnised, to some fair haven, than to beat behind 
breakwater with all the rigging intact. Security can 
never come by a withdrawal from life. 

Again, there have been times when men have 
sought security by yielding to the world. They 
hoped for it, not by a withdrawal from life, but by a 
surrender to life. It was built noon the philosophy, 
"Let us eat, drink and be merry." They attempted 
to eseane by throwing life into the whirlpool of vice 
and yielding to all manner of terrible induleencies. 
There is nothing quite so tragic in all the world 'is 
the siyht of men, made in the imase of God, yielding 
to all manner of excesses with the hope that they can 
forget. How pitiful it is to see men giving themselves 



to prodigality and sensuality hoping so to evade the 
sense of insecurity and find, at least for a little 
while, peace and contentment. Why are we so slow 
in learning the folly of this philosophy; when will 
we stop tossing the image of God in the dust of 
worldliness? Behind the tragic increase of drug 
addicts and drunkenness is the attempt of men to 
find security by yielding to the world. But it is vain. 
There is no such pot of gold hanging at the end of 
that rainbow. The asylums and prisons of the land 
are crowded with people who in their vain search 
for contentment have come to tragic ruin. Behind 
prison bars, in lonely attic rooms or on beds of pain 
you will all too often hear the tragic confession of 
those who searched for security by yielding to the 
world. It only brings mental anguish, physical de- 
terioration and spiritual despair. With regret gnaw- 
ing at the lute strings of their desolate hearts they 
walk softly all their days. 

* * * # * 

Bless God there is a better way to security. By 
His grace untold multitudes have traveled that road, 
for it has no disillnsionments. Security is not a 
matter of withdrawing from the world or yielding 
to the world, but of conquering the world. 

Centuries ago in a Roman dungeon, spent and 
worn with travel and bent with infirmities, a pris- 
oner of the Empire sat chained between two prof- 
ligate Roman soldiers. For the sake of the Nazarene 
wh.om he proclaimed, he had come to this untoward 
setting. Hunted like a criminal, the hellish machina- 
tions of his enemies triumphed and the shadows of 
death were already falling thick and fast across his 
path. Any moment now he might be led out to the 
executioner's block The end was not far off. His 
own converts in Asia Minor wondered how he could 
maintain his serenity in the face of overwhelming- 
odds. He did not long hesitate in answerng that 
question. As he looked back upon life and measured 
the forces which gave him steadfastness and security, 
he w?-ote his conviction in lines such as these: "Noth- 
ing shall separate me from the love of God which 
is in Christ Jesus" — "No other foundation can man 
lay than that which is laid, even Jesus Christ" — 
"It is no longer I that live, but Christ who liveth hi 
me" — I know in whom I have believed and am per- 
suaded that He is able to keep that winch I have 
committed unto Him against that day" — "Your liPe 
is hid with Christ in Cod." He had found a depth 
so deep, a hei°.ht so inaccessible and a distance so 
great that nothing could dismay him. His security 
was not based on material guarantees or economic 
certainty, but a spiritual union with Christ. Bard 
made the discovery that the abiding things are al- 



APRIL, 1935 



13 



ways hidden from the eyes of men. The vulnerable 
life always clings to the visible things of earth, while 
the invulnerable life rests in the invisible things of 
God. In Christ Jesus he conquered the untoward 
circumstances of life and became triumphant. 

Rain may muddy the thin stream, wind may fret 
the shallow waters, but in the heart of the sea there 
is a calm. The untoward fretting things lie close to 
the surface, but he whose life is hid with Christ in 
God comes to an inexpressible peace. There are un- 
told multitudes who through winter and summer, 
autumn and spring, sunshine and rain, victory and 
defeat, pain and happiness, meet life unafraid be- 
cause their daily litany is, "He will not suffer thy 
foot to be moved" — "Underneath and round about 
us are His everlasting arms"— "Rest in the Lord"- — 
"Fret not thyself" — "He is able to keep." 

In the rediscovery' of God you will rediscover that 
security which our hearts crave. Those who follow 
the Son of God amid perplexities and dilemmas say 
with Peter: "To whom shall we go, but unto Thee?" 
Saint Augustine speaks for all generations, "Thou 
hast made ns for Thyself and our hearts are restless 
'til they rest in Thee." Loti walked out of prodi- 
gality into a new beauty of life and called back, 
"Nothing will satisfy if once you have seen Christ." 
Disappointed with political security, disillusioned by 
the failures of economic guarantees, dismayed by 
religious unrest and uncertainty, happy is he wh) 
in his heart finds the light which no storm can blow 
out, the peace which no darkness can dim and the 
joy which no earthly dilemma can shrivel. 
"Jesus, Thou joy of loving hearts, 
Thou fount of life. Thou light of men, 
From the best bliss that earth imparts 
We turn unfilled to Thee again." 



GENERAL CHURCH NEWS 



Twenty well trained Armenian priests from the 
Seminary in Jerusalem are now serving the Arme- 
nian Church ; they are a product of the years in which 
Canon Bridgeman has been teaching at the Seminary. 
Two are working in California and one is to work 
in Manchuria. The Episcopal Church is honored in 
having this small share, through the Good Friday 
Offering in renewing and strengthening the ancient 
Armenian Church. 

In the Orthodox Church, still bearing the scars of 
thirteen centuries of Moslem oppression, another op- 
portunity for help is waiting. For more than twenty 
years there has been no seminary to train clergy for 
the many Arabic-speaking parishes. The reestab- 
lishment of a seminary might be made possible by a 
relatively small increase in the Good Friday Offering. 
Canon Bridgeman says. "A sum which hardly suf- 
fices for a year in a single small American parish 
would redound to the benefit of the whole Orthodox 
Church in Palestine by providing a new supply of 
trained priests." 



Those dust storms in the Middle West have been 
doing some havoc in the Church's work. In one 
town, a clean white stucco church was turned pot : 
black. Much illness has resulted from the storms. 
The Rev. R. A.Johnson of Arapohoe, Western Nebras- 
ka, who succeeded Mr. James Whitney as executive 
secretary in that distric*, has been ill and had to miss 
a Sunday service for the first time since his ordina- 
tion in 1928. From Salina, Bishop Mize reports 
Church services and other work interfered with by 
the storm. 



Among the young men in St. Paul's University and 
Middle School, Tokyo, this past year there were stu- 
dents from every prefecture of Japan. The diocese 
of Tokyo has 500, and the remaining nine other dio- 
ceses of the Japanese Church average 110 in the Uni- 
versity departments. Foreign students are present 
from China, Manchukuo, Korea, Formosa, Siam, the 
United States and the Philippine Islands. At Com- 
mencement, on March, 21, 220 received diplomas and 
decrees. 



The Executive Board of the Woman's Auxiliary 
meets in New York April 26. 27 and 29. The Nation- 
al Council mee^s April 30, Mav 1 and 2. 



1 935—1885—1835—1735—1135—635 

Many anniversaries are being kept in 1935. The 
Order of the Daughters of the King is fifty years old. 
One hundred years ago the first missionary bishop 
in the Episcopal Church, Jackson Kemper, was elect- 
ed, the Spirit of Missions was inaugurated, the first 
Episcopal Church missionaries departed for China, 
and the first ones were appointed for Liberia, the 
Board of Missions was formed, predecessor of the 
present Domestic and Foreign Missions Departments, 
and the dioceses of Chicago and Madras were organ- 
ized. 

Madras was the first of nine Indian dioceses to be 
set off from the great master diocese of Calcutta 
(which used to include all Australia too) and three 
other diocese have since been set off from Madras. 
The Right Rev. Edward H. M. Waller is the sixth 
bishop of Madras, and Bishop Stewart is the sixth 
bishop of Chicago. 

Several 150th anniversaries come this year; the 
first General Convention and the organization of the 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD 



Diocese of New Jersey, New York, South Carolina 
and Virginia took place in 1785. 

"Octocentenary" is a word not yet much needed 
in the United States, with the world so new and all, 
but quite familiar in England. The cathedrals of Ex- 
eter and Carlisle have celebrated their octocenten- 
aries. (Even eight centuries are not so many. York 
Minster celebrated its thirteen-hundredth some years 
ago.) 

Two notable thirteen-hnndredth anniversaries 
(trecentenaries?) occur this year. In 635 St. Aidan 
became missionary to the Kingdom of Northumbria, 
while over in the shadowy East, unthinkably far 
away, Syrian clergy, Nestorians, took Christianity in- 
to China. The Syro-Chinese monument at Siantn. 
where Bishop Shen now lives, states that teachers 
of the Luminous Doctrine were welcomed there by 
imperial decree in 635. 



NOTES FROM FRIENDLY HALL 




The first thing of real interest that happened at 
Friendly Hall during March was our Auxiliary meet- 
ing' on the 4th, when we had as our guest speaker, 
the Rev. Mr. Mackie of Windsor, who gave us a talk 
on Cuba, where he had served as a missionary for 
some time. His account of the life in Cuba was most 
interesting and he showed us how vitally the influ- 
ence of the Americans who so to Cuba affects the 
natives After his address we had an informal dis- 
cussion, asking Mr. Mnekie questions of his work 
and of the general work of the Church in Cuba. 
Mrs. Mackie and the children joined us for supper 
and we had quite a merry time with them. 

One of our Saturday afternoon gatherings was 
made very attractive by two of our guests, Miss 
Hooper and Miss Grigsby of the College., who gave 
us some very charming readings. 

The early part of March found us very busy at 
College — end of the term exams, and then a nice 
long week-end at home before beginning the new 
term's work. When we came back we found our 
Social Service Committee had purchased materials 
for the layette, which was our big project for the 
spring, and we had to get busy with our sewing. 



Those girls who had had training in the Home Eco- 
nomics department had some good laughs at the 
efforts of some of us, but were real patient in show- 
ing us how to do the job properly. When the little 
garments were completed Ave displayed our handi- 
work at Friendly Hall before the layette was taken 
to the mother — a case of the local Welfare Agency. 

Our United Thank Offering Custodian, Elizabeth 
Wagner, presented the Friendly Hall girls a beauti- 
ful paper on the history and work of the United 
Thank Offering before she took up the contents of 
the blue boxes for presentation at the Woman's Aux- 
iliary Corporate Communion on the Feast of the 
Annunciation. Several of our girls attended this 
service. 

On the morning of March 25th we were terribly 
shocked to hear that Camille Swindell, one of Friend- 
ly Hall's most devoted members, was very ill at the 
Pitt Hospital, having been taken there the night be- 
fore for an operation, suffering with an acute attach 
of appendicitis. We were very anxious about her 
and were relieved by the latter pail of the week to 
know that she was well out of danger. In thankful- 
ness for her recoveiw we asked our rector if we might 
have a corporate Communion of our group at the 
early celebration on Sunday, the '31st. The flowers 
used on the altar at this service were sent to Camille 
by the Altar Committee of the Church. 

Our rector has made this Lent a very real and vital 
thing in the lives of those of us who have had the 
opportunity to attend the services. His talks and 
meditations have given us inspiration and courage 
to make our lives more worthwhile by living closer 
to Christ. 

Our Auxiliary seemed to reach its height with our 
April meeting, and no wonder, for with us was our 
beloved leader, Bishop Darst. His message inspired 
us all toward the one great goal, the extending of 
Cod's Kingdom on earth. With this inspiration he 
also left a quietness and peacefulness in each heart. 

This meeting was held on the 6th and by that time 
Camille was able to be with us, which was a joy to 
everyone. Our attendance was quke splendid, only 
two of our members being prevented from coming. 
Besides, three new girls in the College. Mildred Fish- 
er, Sara Bunn, and Margaret Banck, joined us for 
the d'irst time. We were honored by having at sup- 
per with us. Mrs. Darst. the Reverend Stephen Gard- 
ner of Washington, and the Reverend George Gresh- 
am of Coklsboro. After supper we all gathered 
about the fire in Friendlv Hall and ^.vere given a real 
treat by Mr. Cardner who sang several selections. 

MARY TARRY 
Chairman of Publicity 



APRIL, 1935 



15 



(Continued from Page 7) 
his or her duty, we could capture the youth of 
America for Jesus Christ, in one generation, and 
practically put an end to crime. 

The church is not merely a preventive of crime, 
but it is a barrier against relapse into barbarism, a 
police agency in preserving order, a preservative of 
common virtue and decency. It is a burglar insur- 
ance, makes the streets and parks safe, and protects 
our lives and our property. The stronger the church, 
the cleaner, the healthier, safer, happier and move 
respectable the community. This country is no 
stronger than the homes of its people, and the homes 
are no stronger than the religion in them. The 
power of this nation is in the religion of its people. 

Every person profits to some extent from the 
ehurh.es, whether he serves them or not. It is the 
duty of every man to help support some church. It; 
he does not, then he is living on charity. He is 
profiting and not giving anything in return. He is 
a dependent. 



The church means more than ever before in a 
world gripped by the dificulties and distress of these 
times. Discontent and dissatisfaction haunt man- 
kind everywhere. Worry and anxiety add to the 
misery. The church and Sunday School bear the 
hope of people everywhere. Brooklyn, N. Y. 



IN MEMORIAM 



The Woman's Auxiliary of Zion Parish has suf- 
fered an irreparable loss in the death of its member, 
Mrs. J. C, Douglas, on March 10th, 1935. 

She will be greatly missed by us all, but we must 
bow to our Heavenly Father's will and know that, 
our loss is His gain. 

We extend our love and sympathy to her bereaved 
family and commend them to a loving Heavenly 
Father for comfort and peace. 

MRS. F. d. JORDAN 

MRS. SAM SANDERSON, JR. 

MRS. A. N. CUTLER Committee. 



STATEMENT OP THE AMOUNTS PAID BY THE PARISHES A\D MISSIONS FOR DIOCESAN AND GENERAL, 

CHURCH WORK, JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1935. 



CONVOCATION OF WILMINGTON. 



Parishes 

Beaufort, St. Paul's $ 

Clinton, St. Paul's . .. .... 

Fayetteville, St. John's 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 

Hope Mills, Christ Church 

Kinston, St. Mary's 

New Bern, Christ Church 

Red Springs, St. Stephen's . . 

heven Springs, Holy Innocents' . . 

Southport, St. Philin's 

Wilmington. Good Shepherd 

Wilmington, St. James' 

Wilmington St. John's 

Wilmington, St. Paul's 

Organized Missions. 

Burgaw, St. Mary's 

jjaibun, St. Gabriel's 



Parishes 

Aurora, Holy Cross 

Ayden, St. James' 

Bath, St. Thomas' 

Belha-ven, St. James' 

Bonnerton, St. John's 

Chncowinity. Trinity . 

,^ 1 „„,,^ o - .-'g 

Creswell, St. David's 

JSdenton, St. Pauls 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church 

Farmville, Emmanuel 

GatesviHe, St. Mary's 

Greenville. St Paul's 

Grifton, St. John's 

H^m'lton, St. Martin's 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 

Jessama, Zion 

Jj|fc I,-ndi"?r. St. Heortre's .. 
Plymouth, Grace Church . . . . 

R->per. St. Luke's 

Washington, St Peter's 

Williamston, Advent 



Parishes 

Fayetteville, St. Joseph's 
New Bern, St. Cyprian's . . 
Wilmington, St. Mark's . . 



Organised Miss-ons 

P.ell-aven St. Marv's 

Edenton. St. .Tohn-Evanerelist 
FT^iheth City, St. Phi'ip's .. 
Poldshoro. St. Andrew's ..... 
t-'inston, St. Augustine's .... 
Washington, St, Paul's 



Expec- 


Paid to 


tations Apr. 17th 


365.20 $ 


29.45 


50.00 




2,150 U0 


135.92 


1.000.00 


39.15 


60.00 


15.00 


1.000.0C 


200.00 


2.125.00 


195.49 


55.00 


20 00 


200.00 




169.60 


32.31 


S7i.40 


31.41 


9 781.50 


1,786.58 


2,031.60 


379.86 


1,200.00 


13S.69 


35.00 


6.52 


65.00 


10.^5 


CONVOCATIO 


250.00 


27.65 


300.00 




35.00 




350.00 




100.00 


10. 9S 


1 no 




200.00 


30.00 


300.00 




1,559 80 


2 r n "n 


1,008.76 


145.07 


238.20 


65.00 


128.00 




1.356 2u 


322.65 


200.00 




ns.oo 




400 no 


50.00 


100.00 


7.50 


2on no 


15 no. 


200 no 


20.00 


75.00 


T> mi 


1,500. "0 


244.38 


100.00 


50.00 


OCATION 


OF COLO 


104.00 




420 00 




140.00 




105.00 




JA, AA 


12.50 


20.15 




60.00 




75.00 




120.00 


10.00 



Lmmberton, Trinity 

North West, All Soul's 

PikevPle. St. George's ... 
Trenton, Grace Church . . . 

Vanceboro, St. Paul's 

Whiteville, Grace Church . 
Wrightsville, St. Andrews 



Unorganized Missions. 

Jasper, St. Thomas' 

Pollocksville, Mission 

Wilmington, Delgado Mission 



Paroehial Missions. 

Campbellton. St. Philip's . . 
Tolar-Hart, Good Shepherd. 



Total 



OF EDENTON 

Windsor, St Thomas'... 

Winton. St. John's 

Woodviile, Grace Church 



Organized Missions 

Ahoskie. St. Thomas' 

Fairfield, All Saints' 

Mnrfreesboro, St. Barnabas' 

Roxobel. St. Mark's 

Sladesville, St. John's ... 
Snow Hill. St. Barnabas' . 
Sunbury, St. Peter's ..... 
Sw.-n Quarter, Calvary ... 
Winterville, St. Luke's . . . 
Yeatesville, St. Matthew's 



Unorganized Missions. 

Avoca, Holy Innocents' 
Camden, St. Joseph's .... 



Total 



Expec- 


Paid to 


tations 


Apr. 17th 


174 no 


24.81 


10.00 


1.01 


20.00 




15.00 




30.00 




100.00 


50.00 


6.00 




20.00 




20.00 




10.00 




25.00 




70.00 


7.00 


$ 21,159.30 


? 3,103.45 


225.00 




100.00 


10.35 


150.00 


11.60 


55.00 




10.00 




30.00 




'92. OS 


20.00 


10.00 




100.00 




42.00 


13.96 


20.00 




125.00 


40.00 


20.00 




80.00 




10.00 




$ 9,835.04 


$ 1,296.54 



Unorganized Missions. 

Aurora, St. Jude's 

Beaufort, St. Clement's 

Preenville, St. Andrew's 

Haddock's Cross Roads, St. Stephen's 

Rnoer. St. Ann's 

Wilmington, "Brooklyn" Mission... 
Wrightsville, St. Augustine's 



43.00 

40 '"I 

30.00 
30.00 
26.00 
20.00 
20.00 



Total 

Grand Total 



5.00 



3.00 
3.00 



$ 1,554.15 $ 



33.50 



S 32,348.49 $ 4,433.49 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD 



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| the Trustees of the Protestant Episcopal j 

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j Church in the Diocese of East Carolina > 



| to be held by them in trust for. 



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RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Conducted for Negro Youth under the auspices of the Epis- 
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A four year accredited College Course is offered, leading to 
degrees of B. A. and 13. S., including Pre-Medical work and 
Teacher Training for State High School Teachers' certificates. 

A College Preparatory Department, Training School for Nurses 
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Thorough training, healthy environment. Christian influences. 
For Catalog and information write — 

The Registrar 
ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE, RALEIGH, N. C. 







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SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 
JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

An Episcopal School for girls — Have your daughter 
receive her education in a church school. 

Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, B. S., 
Principal 

Saint Mary's offers 4 years' High School and 2 
years' College work all fully accredited by the South- 
ern Association. Also courses in Music, Art, Ex- 
pression, Home Economics, and Business. 

20-Acre Campus. Gym and Field Sports. Tennis. 
Indoor Tiled Swimming Pool. Horseback 
Riding. Golf 

A. W. TUCKER, Business Manager. 



S> 8^,erf> 



* 3 <35 



Jan. 36 

Library, U. K. C. 

Chapel Hill, K. G. 



U - N. C. 
SUM ROOM 




VOLUME XLIX 
NUMBER 5 






MAY, 1935 



O 



v 





O 



u 





r\ 



o 



v 




miasion 

Ifralt 



w %ft^im-tt|at-l|tarft^$aa-c0int-lRm22:i7 



TO OUR BELOVED BISHOP 

THOMAS CAMPBELL DARST, D. D. 

ON THE TWENTIETH ANNIVERSARY 

OF HIS CONSECRATION 



IN REMEMBRANCE 




By Alex. C. D. Noe 
On this your anniversary, 
The things we'd like to say, 
Cannot be framed in human words, 
And phrases of a day, 
Nor can the years produce the means, 
To really, truly show, 
Our high esteem and love for you — 
The tribute that we owe, 
No tongue can ever shape the sounds, 
To tell you how we feel, 
But Cod will know, beloved Friend, 
As through the years we kneel, 
And thank Him for your shepherding, 
Unselfish, brave and true; 
And ask for all that life can give, 
In fair return to you. 











THE MISSION HERALD 



KANUGA— A CALL TO DISCIPLESHIP 



It is always a pleasure for me to express myself 
in praise of Summer Conferences : first, because 
it is a satisfaction to bear witness to what I have 
myself so greatly enjoyed, and next, because even 
among the enlightened ranks of the Woman's Aux- 
iliary there are many who still seem to be in the 
dark as to the nature of these annual gatherings, 
and I hope to be able to clear tip these misunder- 
standings. 

Have you ever noticed the indulgent and somewhat 
skeptical expression of some people as they listen 
to the talk of summer conference enthusiasts'? It 
sounds to them like the uncritical opinion of fanatics 
and they take it for what they think it is worth. 
Knowing nothing about these conferences, they have 
at the same time formed a decided — and usually 
erroneous — opinion about them. This misconception 
of the purpose, plan, and conduct of summer con- 
ferences is probably largely the reason for the com- 
paratively small proportion of church people who 
attend them. Now what are some of these ideas 
that are commonly abroad? Some people think of 
a Conference as a variety of Sunday School picnic, 
and wonder how anyone endures a Sunday School 
picnic that lasts two weeks! Then there are those 
w''n think it is a kind of retreat and they shrink 
from an experience for which they doubt their spir- 
itual capacity. And last are those who see it as a 
period of intensive study, which will lead to learned 
theological degrees, and they certainly don't want 
to go in for anything like that. 

Now a Summer Conference is not any one of these 
things, and yet it is a little of them all. The Sunday 
School picnic idea is there in the recreational side of 
the program. The afternoon hours are always left 
open for each one to amuse himself as he likes best: 
tennis, golf, walking, swimming, motoring, or just 
resting. So if this time is the whole holiday of some 
people they need not feel that it will all be spent in 
class rooms hard at work. As to the retreat — of 
course, it is not a retreat, and yet there is some like- 
ness. One withdraws from the ordinary business nf 
life with its duties and distractions, and is in a com- 
pany with a group of like minded persons who are 
there for reasons connected with their religious life. 
Of course there are the Sunday services with their 
inspiring speakers, and every day begins with a 
celebration of the Holy Communion, and every af- 
ternoon closes with the twilight service at the lake 
so that there is frequent opportunity for spiritual 
recreation. Then on the study side there is nothing 
to alarm one. The courses are, of course, taken 
seriously; they are taught by men and women well 



qualified by training and experience to present their 
subjects adequately; but no one is forced to under- 
take a burdensome amount of work. Thus we see 
that the conference program is a well balanced one 
of play, work and worship, designed for physical 
mental and spiritual refreshment. 

What specific opportunities does this program pre- 
sent to the people of our parishes and, more par- 
ticularly to the women of the Auxiliary? First, I 
should list the opportunity to continue our religious 
education. Realizing that education is never a com- 
pleted process but an always continuing one, most 
families provide for its continuation by having on 
hand a variety of newspapers, magazines, and books 
to supplement all the other educational agencies. 
Now religious education is one phase of this educa- 
tive process, and yet for most of tis, after confirma- 
tion or at any rate after reaching ohr fifteenth or 
sixteenth year, our religious education comes to an 
end. No matter how thorough our church school 
training may have been or how carefully given our 
confirmation instruction, surely this needs expand- 
in?; and supplementing as we reach mnturer years. 
What do we really know of the teaching of the 
Church, of the Bible, of our Prayer Book ; how well 
versed are we in Church History, what do we know 
of the great missionary enterprise of the church, 
and has our devotional life advanced nruch as the 
years have gone on? According to the records, only 
a small proportion of our church families take any 
religious papers, and probably even fewer provide 
themselves with books on religious subjects. It is 
hard to do any systematic study at home; most of 
us are busy people and we lack the facilities for 
study. Our rectors are too busy to hold classes on 
a variety of subjects and few lay people are qualfied 
for such service. Here the Summer Conference 
comes in. A glance at the prospectus shows a wide 
variety of subjects covering Church teaching, wor- 
ship and history; the B'ible; the life of Christ and of 
St. Paul; the Program of the Church and related 
topics. For two weeks under teachers who are the 
leaders in the thought and work of the Church today, 
you carry on your studies. You may if you wish 
take the examinations in connection with these cour- 
ses and to secure credits for a diploma in the Na- 
tional Accredited Leaders Association. 

Second, T give the opportunity which a conference 
presents for church school teachers to prepare them- 
selves for their work. Many of our Auxiliary women 
are now church school teachers, many more should 
be. They need the church school for their children, 
and the school needs intelligent and devoted persons 
who are willing- to offer themselves for this most 
(Continued on Page 14) 



The Mission Herald 



VOLUME XLIX 



WILMINGTON, N. O. MAY, 1935 



NUMBER 5 



BISHOP'S ANNUAL ADDRESS 



Brethren of the Clergy and Laity 
of the Diocese of East Carolina — 

"Grace be unto you and peace from God our Father, 
and from the Lord Jesus Christ." 

With a feeling of profound gratitude to God for 
having graciously permitted me to serve you for 
twenty years, I welcome you to the fifty-second 
Annual Convention of our Diocese. 

We are meeting in St. Paul's Church, Beaufort, 
for the first time, and we must first of all offer our 
word of praise to this Parish for the new life and 
energy that has made it possible for it to take its 
fine, helpful place among the all too few self-sup- 
porting parishes of East Carolina. 

Twenty Years 

It is fitting perhaps that I should at this Conven- 
tion give a brief survey of my Episcopate during 
the past twenty years, and I do so with a sense of 
humble pride that I have been permitted to play my 
little part in the life and work of the Church in 
East Carolina, and beyond, during these epoch mak- 
ing years that have witnessed the changing of the 
map of the world. 

Since coming to you in January 1915, I have laid 
my hands in Confirmation upon the heads of seven 
thousand, four hundred and sixty-one people, a 
greater company than our present number of re- 
corded Communicants. 

I have Ordained forty-five Deacons and forty-four 
Priests, many of whom are numbered among our pre- 
sent splendid staff of Diocesan Clergy. Others of that 
number who received their commissions as Ordained 
servants of Christ in East Carolina are serving Him 
and His Church in nineteen dioceses throughout the 
United States, and from the reports that come to me 
from time to time, I am satisfied that these men 
are making full proof of their ministry. 

During this same period, East Carolina has been 
represented by her faithful daughters in Alaska, the 
Phillipines, Porto Rico. China and Japan and in 
numerous dioceses and Missionary districts in this 
country. 

We have built during the past twenty years six 
new Churches to replace those already established, 
and twelve Churches in places where we had never 
been represented. 

We rejoice in the knowledge that East Carolina 



from the beginning of its history has been a mis- 
sionary-minded diocese, and while we have not been 
able to give large sums to the cause of missions 
throughout the world, we have honestly tried to 
carry our share of the financial responsibility. With 
only fourteen self-supporting parishes out of the 
ninety-five parishes and missions in the Diocese, 
we have not only responded, with rare exceptions, 
year after year to the privilege of doing our full 
part in the work of the National Church, but have 
carried forward, without endowment or special 
gifts the largest diocesan Missions program, per 
capita, of any diocese in the entire South. 

This has been made possible through the self 
sacrificing generosity of many of the parishes, and 
notably of some Avho forgetful of their own parish 
needs, went without necessary equipment and es- 
sential improvements in order that the larger cause 
might not suffer. 

We have had to struggle year after year in order 
to keep the Missionary programs from faltering, 
but we have never lost heart or taken counsel of 
our fears. 

Your Bishop has had many trying days, and the 
task has not been easy at times, but I have always 
been strengthened by the consciousness that my 
burden, if one could call it a burden, was shared by 
my loyal friends of the Clergy and laity, by men 
and women who have never failed to give me their 
sympathy, their prayers and their loving support. 
Some of those men and women have entered into 
that larger life with God, but the memory of their 
helpful companionship and beautiful cooperation is 
a living- force in my life today. Many others of 
that loyal band are still with us, and for all that 
they have meant, and still mean, to me, I am pro- 
foundly grateful. In the fellowship of such noble 
souls I will continue, please God, to go forward 
without fear to the larger field of more perfect 
service in His name and for His cause. 

Outstanding Work 

Looking back over the past twenty years, certain 
features of our work stand out as unusually hopeful. 

The splendid campaign inaugurated and carried 
forward under the leadership of the Rev. Dr. Milton, 
Rev. William E. Cox, Rev. Thomas P. Noe, Mr. 
George B. Elliott, and others, which lifted our Dio- 
cese to such a high plane of intelligent and generous 
missionary interest. 

The creation of the Executive Council with its 
helpful departments, and the invaluable service of 



4 



THE MISSION HERALD 



our faithful and efficient Secretary, Rev. Walter R. 
Noe. 

The growth and development of the Colored work 
with the increasing sense of responsibility of that 
group of our fellow Churchmen. Of the painfully 
few self-supporting Colored Churches in the South, 
we are proud to report that two of that number are 
in East Carolina. 

The beautiful and consecrated work of the Wom- 
an's Auxiliary which under the leadership of three 
spirit filled women during the years of my Episco- 
pate has maintained its place as the very living, 
loving heart of missionary activity and zeal in our 
Diocesan life. 

The young people's work with its splendid Dio- 
cesan organization, its helpful parish activities and 
its marvelous opportunity for training future leaders 
in our own Summer camp on the Pamlico. 

Our Future 

Surely, with our background, our equipment, our 
loyal, united Diocese, there is no reason why we 
should not go forward with high courage and un- 
conquerable faith to greater heights of service, to 
greater victories for Christ and His cause. 

We must increase the number of self-supporting 
parishes and fields in order that our resources may 
be used in the extension of His Kingdom — for an 
advance movement into those fields of real need 
which have waited for us so long. 

This can be done if we really have the mind of 
Christ, if His purpose becomes our purpose, if His 
Gospel becomes a vital power in the lives of our 
people. It is a significant fact that every parish and 
mission field assuming self-support during my Epis- 
copate, did so, not during the old easy days, but 
during the hard, stern years of the great depression. 
A notable example of this fine spirit is found in the 
Martin County field, made up of the Church of the 
Advent, Williamston : St. Martin's, Hamilton; and 
Trinity Mission, Bear Grass; which assumed self- 
support since the last meeting of our Convention. 

The fine example of this field should and MUST 
lie followed by other groups of dependent Churches 
during the next five years. 

The Church in East Carolina must continue to be 
broad in its conception of its place and part in the 
whole program of the Church. We must continue 
to avoid the fatal provincialism that tends to narrow 
the vision to the horizon of our limited boundaries. 
We must be loyal to our Diocese: we must be gener- 
ously responsive to its needs ; but we must never 
fornet that our Diocese is a sharer in the whole plan 
of Cod. and that your Bishop, while attached to 
East Carolina bv ties of affection and bv Canonical 



order, is a Bishop of the Church of God whose 
boundaries are as wide as the love of God, and whose 
field extends to the uttermost bounds of the world. 

Should the day come when it would seem wise to 
lose our Diocesan identity and be merged with a 
larger and stronger organization, 1 believe that we 
wcAuld face the situation with wisdom and courage 
and self-forgetting consecration, because we have 
been taught that the whole is greater than any part, 
and that our chief purpose is not to glorify or mag- 
nify one section of our State, but rather to consider 
God's plan for the strengthening of His Kingdom in 
North Carolina and the world. 

As we go forward, we must be keenly conscious 
of the problems confronting our civilization, prob- 
lems that must be met and solved by a Church that 
still believes in its mission, and still trusts in the 
resistless power of God. 

The Forward Movement Commission has empha- 
sized the emergency confronting the Church today. 
Tt has frankly admitted that we are not holding the 
line for Christ and His Church. 

That as a Church we are neglecting to give of our 
means to that cause for which Jesjns counted it 
worth while to die. 

That Ave are neglecting our privilege of meeting 
in God's House for worship and instruction. 

That worldliness and indifference are permeating 
the life of the Church and poisoning the stream that 
was designed to make glad, not only the City of 
God, but the cities and towns and slums and country 
side of this earth. 

That we are neglecting to train the youth of 
America in Christian citizenship, and that as a result 
of that neglect, there are more than fifteen million 
young people in America to whom the Church means 
practically nothing, and because THIS is true, our 
iails and penitentiaries are crowded with criminals 
whose average age in the past ten years has dropped 
from thirty to nineteen. 

The Church must go forward with Christ. It mfust 
renew its spiritual vigor. It must recover its lost 
radiance. It must cast off its sloth and indifference 
and worldliness, or it must be honest enough not to 
call itself by the name of Him Whose life it no longer 
cares to live, and whose Body it no longer strives to 
represent. 

There must be a renewal of spiritual energy, a 
departure from the cold, formal acceptance of a 
system that seems unable to understand the tragedy 
of a broken world. 

The Church cannot answer the agony and the 
rebellion and the cynicism of poor disillusioned hu- 
(Continued on Bage 14) 



MAY, 1935 



'K>1d OlIEs Wm TCHWORD" 



CAN we, the people and clergy of East Carolina, justify the title of this page? Aim n B u, 
SHALL we? 

Since 1929, the first year of the Depression, which we ended without debt, the receipts from 
parishes and missions have steadily decreased until 1934, when they were about $31,000.00. The high- 
water mark of the past was about $70,000.00 which we reached in 1921, making a decrease to the pres- 
ent year of over 50 per cent. Along with the decrease in contributions, some of our investments have 
been lost altogether and dividends from all of them have declined. Hence our debt, accumulated during 
the past four years, has reached $23,000.00. At the same time the stipends of the clergy, beginning 
with the bishop's, have been reduced 25 to 50 per cent; while some fields have been combined, others 
temporarily abandoned and rigid economy has been practiced in all costs of administration. Always 
appropriations for the year have been based upon what the parishes and missions told the Executive 
Council of the Diocese to EXPECT as the result of the Aniiual Every Member Canvass — expectations 
which failed to be met at the end of the year. 

It will be seen, therefore, that our present debt, as the total amount of the accumulated 
deficits of the last four years, is not the result of blind and reckless expenditure, but of a desperate 
effort, based upon reasonable assumptions, to maintain at least a minimum of efficiency in the work 
left us. 

And now, we can neither go forward nor even hold our own, until we assure the lifting of 
this burden, which costs us $1380.00 a year interest, and endangers our credit during those months 
when receipts are inadequate to meet our appropriations for the support of our bishop and missionary 
clergy, and must temporarily be borrowed until receipts come in later in the year. 

Realizing these conditions, the Committee on the celebration of the Twentieth Anniversary 
of the Bishop, presented the matter to the visitors at the last Convention as a part of the Celebration, 
and appealed for their loyal and enthusiastic support of a Plan, later submitted to the Convention, which 
unanimously adopted the following resolutions: 

WHEREAS, this year the Diocese of East Carolina is celebrating with its Bishop, Thomas 
Campbell Darst, the Twentieth Anniversary of his Consecration on the Epiphany, 1915; therefore, be it 

RESOLVED, that in grateful commemoration of that event in the life of the Diocese, this 
Convention does hereby initiate and establish a fund, to be known as the "Bishop's Memorial Anniver- 
sary Fund," the principal and proceeds from said fund to be used for the liquidation of at least $20,000 
of its present debt, incurred for the support of the work of the Diocese during his Episcopate; 

RESOLVED FURTHER, that the collection of this fund be distributed equally over four 
years, having as its objective at least $5,000 for each year, the first year to end Epiphany 1936; 

RESOLVED FURTHER, that a special committee, composed of four clergy and eight lay peo- 
ple be appointed by the Bishop at this Convention, whose duties it shall be to take such efficient steps as 
they shall deem necessary to bring this matter before every member of the Church in the Diocese, and, 
if possible, to secure from each of them an annual contribution, to be made through an offering which 
shall be taken in every Parish and Mission in the Diocese on the Sunday after Epiphany of each year-, 
or to be paid at such other time during the year as may be most convenient to the contributor; 

RESOLVED FINALLY, that any amount received in excess of the present debt be added 
to the amount already in hand from the Bishop Watson Legacy and such other funds as may properly be 
designated for such purpose, and be known and permanently constituted as the "Episcopal Endowment 
Fund'' — the interest therefrom to be used solely for the support of the Bishop of East Carolina. 

Careful study of these resolutions must show that care has been taken, not to embarrass the 
maintenance of our present work, either in parish or diocese, through an unreasonable demand upon 
the contributions of the people. To avoid such embarassment the resolutions provide for the spreading 

("Con tinned on Page 14) 



THE MISSION HERALD 



JITUUUERSARl] CELEBRATION 



The Twentieth Anniversary of Bishop Darst 's Consecration was celebrated in St. Paul's Church, 
Beaufort, May 15th, during the meeting of the Annual Convention. The sermon was preached by the 
Rt. Rev. Edwin A. Penick, D. D., Bishop of the Diocese of North Carolina. The Rev. C. A. Ashby, a 
member of the Anniversary Committee, presented to Bishop Darst from the people of the Diocese and 
many of his friends elsewhere a loving cup and a Book of Remembrance. More than five hundred 
people were present for the service and the names of nearly five thousand were sent in for the Book 
of Remembrance. We have space in this issue for only a few of the many letters and telegrams that 
were received. 

Raleigh, N. C- — "As one of the original Darst supporters, may I not offer my congratulations on 
your Twentieth Anniversary and express my delight in the justification and wisdom of that choice 
which your twenty years of service have given. My affectionate admiration follows you always. 

J. C. B. ERIN CHAD'S. " 

Pitman, N. J. — "Congratulations on his beatituder Twentieth Anniversary. May God grant you 
many more. Sincerely, 

(REV.) GEORGE BO ATE." 

Ft. Pierce, Fla. — "Greetings. Felicitation on your Twentieth Anniversary as a true shepherd. 

(REV.) J. M. TAYLOR." 

Sisterville, W. Va. — "Sorry not to be with you on the Twentieth Anniversary of your Conse- 
cration. Just back from Arizona where boy has been owing to lung trouble. Love and prayers are 
always yours. 

(REV.) GEORGE WOOD." 

Greensboro, Ala. — "We send affectionate greetings to our beloved Bishop. 

AGNES and J. HEYES." 
(Rev. and Mrs. J. W. Heyes.) 

Pittsboro, N. C— .Love and congratulations on your Twentieth Anniversary from two of your child- 
ren who long to be with you. 

MAGGIE and JACK." 
| ' ■ "'" ' (Rev. and Mrs. J. Q. Beckwith, Jr.) 

Elizabeth City, N. C. — "Regret not being present at your Twentieth Anniversary celebration as I 
was at your election and consecration. -Hearty congratulations with the continuing love and devotion 
which you have in such large measure from your people. We shall. God willing, go on for years to 
come. Cam joins with me. 

MRS. C. W. MELICTC." 

Windsor, N. C. 
"My dear Bishop: 

I have been confined with a serious cold and head trouble that keeps me from Beaufort where I 
very much wished to go. Twenty years ago is a very much cherished memory in my life. 

Mrs. Winston and I send you aur warm affection and wish you many years of sacred usefulness. 
Our love to you, of course, includes Mrs. Darst 

'Cordially and lovingly, 

Your friends, 

JUDGE and MRS. F. D. WINSTON." 
' (Continued on Page 13) 



MAY, 1935 



MEETING OF ELEVENTH DISTRICT 
WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 



On Friday ; April 26, 3935, the annual meeting of 
the auxiliaries of the eleventh district was held in 
St. John's Church, Fayetteville. 

At ten thirty, Holy Communion was administered 
by the rector, assisted by the Rev. Mr. Latta. 

At eleven the meeting was called to order by the 
district chairman, Mrs. S. L. Smtih, of Whiteville. 

A cordial welcome was extended by Mrs. Marsden 
De Rosette to which Mrs. Beck with most graciously 
responded. 

Roll call was responded to as follows: Woman's 
Auxiliary, St. John's Church, Fayetteville, 12; Young 
Woman's Auxiliary. 8; Woman's Auxiliary, St. Phil- 
ip's, Fayetteville, 1; Hope Mills, 0; Lumberton, 3; 
Maxton, 0; (not organized) Red Springs, 0; (not 
organized) Whiteville. 7. 

Following the roll call reports from the various 
auxiliaries were read. These reports showed most 
excellent work was being done for the advancement 
of Cod's Kingdom. 

Mrs. Smith extended a most graeio'us greeting and 
expressed great pleasure in meeting in so beautiful a 
church and parish house, also pleasure in having 
several splendid speakers on the program. Refer- 
ring to the diocesan officers which it is always such 
an inspiration to have at the district meetings. Mrs. 
Smith closed her greetings with a wish that each of 
us receive today just the message thai will strength- 
en us and cause us to go about our Father's business 
with renewed inspiration. 

Mrs. Bcekwith made a most helpful talk on " (Gen- 
eral Auxiliary Work," urging that we unite, the 
only way to carry on the work of the Woman's Aux- 
iliary. "Are we facing the challenge of this world 
as His disciples ? If so, we must not be idle." Lack 
of interest is often because they do not know of fhc 
work. She stressed the importance of summer work 
and asked that all who can attend the annual con- 
vention to be held in Beaufort. May 15 and 1(1, at 
which time our beloved Bishop's 20th Anniversary 
as Bishop of this diocese will be celebrated. 

At noon Mr. Latta came in for prayers and g;ave 
a fine folk on "Discipleship. " 

Tt was a great pleasure and privilege to have with 
us Mrs. 'Jutland, Diocesan President of the Woman's 
Auxiliary, who gave us the "High Lights of the 
Elizabeth City Convention," and as always, inspired 
all who heard her message to lives of greater use- 
fulness and consecration 

At one o'clock a most delightful lunch was served 



by the ladies of St. John's, and a social hour enjoyed. 

Afternoon devotion was conducted by the Rev. 
Mr. Alligood when the meeting re-convened at 2 
o'clock. 

Mrs. W. A. Darden, newly elected Diocesan Publi- 
city Chairman, asked that we send news items to the 
Mission Herald, so many that our diocesan paper will 
have to be enlarged, also that we subscribe to at 
least one Church paper, and all go to Kanuga. 

The Y. P. S. L. was presented by MJiss Ann Wil- 
liams Tillinghast, Diocesan vice-president. She gave 
a most interesting and. instructive talk on "Our 
Diocesan Young People." 

Mis. Wallace Huffines. Diocesan Chairman of Edu- 
cation, gave many helpul suggestions for our educa- 
tional work, and ways to make it more interesting. 

The Rev. Mr. Alligood pronounced the benediction. 
Respectfully submitted, 

LILLIE DICKSON, Secretary 



MEETING OF FOURTH DISTRICT— WOMAN'S 
AUXILIARY 



The annual Get-Together meeting of District No. 4 
was held in historical old St. Thomas' Church, 
Bath, N. O, May 17th. at 10 :30 o'clock. Mrs. Edgar 
Douglas, president and Adelaide Watson, secretary. 

Rev. Sidney E. Matthews celebrated Holy Com- 
munion. 

Miss Mary Tankard made the address of welcome 
to which Mrs. F. G. Jordan responded. 

Mi's F. L. Outland made an inspiring talk and 
gave a very interesting report of the Conferences. 
Mrs. W. A. Darden. of Greenville, publicity chairman, 
spoke on Church Publicity. 

The reports from the Auxiliaries were fine, all 
active and doing splendid work. 

After the meeting adjourned the hostess Auxiliary 
served a delicio<us chicken salad luncheon at the 
school building;. 



WOMEN MAY BE MEMBERS OF VESTRY 



At the meeting of the Annual Convention held in. 
St. Paul's Church, Beaufort, a change Avas made in 
Canon 14, Section 1, which will make it possible for 
one-third of the members of any vestry to be women. 
The change in the Canon reads as follows: "Con- 
sisting of not less than three and not more than 
twelve members, who shall be communicants of law- 
ful age and in good standing. One-third of the 
members of any vestry may be women. The mem- 
bers of the Vestry thus elected shall continue in 
office until their successors are chosen." 



THK MISSION HERALD 



The Mission Herald 

ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 

Published Monthly except July and August at 

507 Southern Building 
WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF " 

Editor 

REV. WALTER R. NOE 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 

RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 

MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 
Advertising rates furnished on application. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to receive 
their papers, should promptly notify the Business Man- 
ager, giving when necessary, both the old and new ad- 
dress. 



PEOPLE OF DIOCESE SHOW THEIPv LOVE FOR 
BISHOP DARST 



During this year, the people of the Diocese of 
East Carolina have had a special opportunity to 
express their love for Bishop Darst and their ap- 
preciation of all that he has done for them since 
his consecration as Bishop of the Diocese. At the 
time of his Twentieth Anniversary — the Feast of 
the Epiphany — they met in their churches through- 
out the Diocese and prayed for God's richest bless- 
ings upon him. For several weeks before and at 
the time of the Convention, they made their offerings 
to the Anniversary Fund. Nearly five thousand of 
them had a part in this offering, and their names 
will have a place in the Book of Remembrance. At 
the meeting of the Convention, when his Twentieth 
Anniversary was celebrated they came by hundreds 
from all parts of the Diocese to the Service, and 
during the meeting of the Convention, they promised 
to help him pay off a large Diocesan debt and to 
start an Endowment Fund for the support of the 
Episcopate. In every parish and mission the people 
are devoted to him and will do their best to cooperate 
with him in any plan that he may have for tin- 
extension of the Church's work in the Diocese and 
throughout the World. 



DEPARTMENTS OF THE EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 



meetings of the departments during the coming year. 

There is a great deal of work for each department 
to do, and it is very important for meetings to be 
held for a discussion of the plans that will be pre- 
pared by the Chairmen. 

Two new chairmen were appointed at the meeting 
— the Rev. Worth Wicker of St. Paul's, Greenville, 
for the Department of Christian Social Service and 
Mr. W. B. Campbell of St, Paul's, Wilmington, for 
the Department of Publicity. 

The chairmen who were re-elected are : Mr. George 
B. Elliott of St. James', Wilmington, for the Depart- 
ment of Missions and Church Extension ; Rev. Alex- 
ander Miller of St. Paul's, Wilmington, for the Field 
Department; Mr. John R. Tolar of St, John's, Fay- 
etteville, for the Department of Finance ; and Rev. 
George S. Gresham of St, Stephen's, Coldsboro, 'for 
the Department of Religious Education. 

The Department of Religions Education is now 
doing a fine piece of work through the summer 
camps at Camp Lea eh. It is hoped that it will work 
out some plans for the Church Schools as many of 
them need attention at th : s time. 

The Department of Missions and Church Exten- 
sion, through its associate membership, has been 
most successful in the collection of the pledges of 
the people for Diocesan and General Church Work. 

The Finance Department has made a real contri- 
bution to the work of the Diocese by a careful study 
of its needs and by carefully planned financial 
programs 

The plans of the Field Department for a number 
of years have been of inestimable value in the prepa- 
ration for and conduct of the Every Member Canvass. 

We believe that the Departments of Christian 
Social Service and Publicity, with their new chair- 
men will soon present plans that will help us to 
solve many of our problems. 



DELEGATES TO THE PROVINCIAL SYNOD 



At the meeting of the Executive Council of the 
Diocese held in St. Paul's. Beaufort, at the close of 
the Convention, it was decided to have regular 



Delegates: Rev. Stephen Gai'dner, Washington; 
Rev. W. R. Noe, Wilmington; Rev. Lawrence M. 
Fenwick. Beaufort : Rev. B. F. Huske, D. D.. Kinston ; 
Rev. Alexander Miller, Wilmington; Rev. J. L. Ma- 
lone, Winton; Mr. Dal Wooten, Kinston; Mr. George 
C. Royall, Goldsboro ; Judge George Rountree, Wil- 
mington; Mr. Edmund Harding, Washington; Mr. 
W. R. Cibbs, Lake Landing; Mr. J. Q. Beckwith, 
Lumberton. 

Alternates: Rev. S. E. Matthews. Washington; 
Rev. Worth Wicker, Greenville; Rev. E. F. Moseley, 
Williamston; Rev. George S. Gresham, Goldsboro; 
Rev. John W. Hardy. Columbia; Rev. E. C. McCon- 
n el. Wilmington. 



MAY, 1935 



ANNIVERSARY SERMON 



By Rt. Rev. Edwin A. Penick, D. D., Bishop of 
North Carolina 



Revelation 10:1-2 ''And I saw another mighty 
angel come down from heaven .... and he set his 
right foot upon the sea, and his left foot on the 
earth." 

Conscious of the significance of this Convention, 
and of the anniversary of your beloved Diocesan 
which it commemorates, I bring to him and to you all 
the affectionate greetings of your sister diocese neigh- 
boring on the west. I speak not in my own accent, 
but with the sound of many voices in which you may 
hear the mingled tones of a multitude of friends, in 
my diocese as well as yours, whose congratulations 
today are no sooner expresed than they become a 
prayer of thanksgiving to Cod that He has raised 
up in His Church, and spared until this moment, such 
a chief shepherd of East Carolina, a man full of the 
Holy Ohost and of power. Now the ranking Bishop 
of this state, not only in seniority, but in distinguish- 
ed service, I extend to him no formal salutation, but 
a silent hand-clasp of brotherly love that lies too 
deep for words. Our hearts' desire for him, and our 
prayer to Cod is that he may be spared to finish his 
work which the Spirit of Love has begun and con- 
tinued in him until this day,, and that you, and all 
the people of this great diocese, "may abound yet 
more and more in knowledge and in all discernment 
. . being filled with the fruits of righteousness, which 
are by Christ Jesus, unto the glory and praise of 
Cod." 

John, the mystic of Patmos, in exile for the faith- 
fulness of his testimony, being in the Spirit on the 
Lord's Day. sees a series of visions of things to come. 
Poetry and symbolism and mysticism mingle here in 
a way that escapes analysis or explanation. But as 
we read, with fascination, Ave feel for a certainty 
that here is a spiritual insight that touches reality. 
With pictures that kindle the imagninati'on and with 
poetry that intimates unuterrable truth, the exiled 
seer detaches himself from the world, and in vision, 
looks on. an awed and reverent spectator, while the 
Church encounters the shocks of time, and eventual- 
ly brines to pass the Kingdom of Cod on earth. For 
a few minutes this morning, may we not imitate St. 
John, the Divine, and in our own bungling and im- 
perfect way, detach ourselves from this occasion, and 
look objectively at the Diocese of East Carolina. We 
stand aside from the pressure of the moment, we hush 
the emot'ons th.it are elamorine: for expression, we 
assume the role of sympathetic spectators and ob- 



serve two things, first, the experience of the past and 
secondly, the determination of the future. 

(1) The messenger, in John's vision, set his left 
foot upon the earth. Here is the foundation of the 
past, the firmament of history, the actual human re- 
cord of the Church's experience in this diocese. And 
what does the record tell ? Certainly two things, the 
first of which is the missionary spirit of East Caro- 
lina. 

I find in the "Spirit of Missions" for February, 
1884, an article by the Rev. Mr. Cassey. Writing 
from New Bern he says: "I wish I were able to 
draw a picture which would represent the great 
needs of this work, and another which would give an 
idea of what glorious and precious fruiit might be 
obtained for the Master. We have a field ripe to the 
harvest, with but a few laborers and insufficient 
means to support them. Still we are waiting and 
hoping." The diocese was not one year old when 
these words were written. Yet here is a vision of the 
task, dependence upon the sufficiency of Christ, the 
patience to wait and the courage to hope. This kind 
of hope is not a forlorn and resigned inaction but a 
throbbing and vital power. It springs from love. 
It merges into faith. It is an attitude that calls to 
arms the militant forces of discipleship. And in this 
attitude, with all the programs that flowed from it 
and the blessings of Ood that poured down upon it, 
the diocese began its mis'ionary career. This is not 
surmise nor wishful retrospect. It is an accomplish- 
ed fact. Call the roll of the dioceses of the Church, 
and are there many whose names stand higher in our 
missionary annals'? The secret of this accomplish- 
ment lies deep. It is not, as Dr. Sturges wrote last 
month, a mere obedience to the great commission of 
Christ. Men might "go into all the world and 
preach 1he gospel to every creature" under the mo- 
tive of duty and compulsion. But Avhen they do. it 
is not the gospel of Christ, for the gospel of Christ 
is witnessing to the truth in love. The missionary 
motive is a comprehensive thing that gathers into 
its embrace the sovereign truths of life, as revealed 
by Christ in all of their length and breadth and 
depth and height, and then witnesses to that revela- 
tion in persuasiveness of reasoned word and loveli- 
ness of perfect deed. May the missionary tradition 
of this diocese, to which the whole Church is indebt- 
ed, be maintained and perpetuated throughout all 
generations, in the simplicity of its witness, and the 
sufficiency of its power unto salvation. 

(2) The Angel of the Apocalypse, standing with 
one foot upon the solid earth of the historical past, 
prompts us to look again to discover wherein the ex- 
perience of this diocese has br>en built upon the 
rock foundation of Cod's purpose. And we observe 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD 



that the leadership and tone of East Carolina has 
been consistently evangelical. At a meeting of tho 
House of Bishops in October, 1925, it was the pro- 
phetic cry of Bishop Darst as much as any other one 
utterance, that summoned the Church to a nation- 
wide proclamation of the Gospel. And it was ne 
who became, in the phrase of Dr. Goodell, the "Her- 
ald of a Passion," who enlisted the whole Church 
in a simultaneous, common task, and "demonstrated 
that the call of Christ and the Gospel appeal have 
lost none of their power to win and hold men." 
(General Convention Journal 1928, P. 457) And 
what was the message of this great awakeinng? 
None other than the promise of Christ that "if He 
be lifted up, He would draw all men unto Him." 
Evangelism — the publishing of good tidings, the 
joyous, eager, urgent proclamation of the grace of 
God manifested and pledged in Christ — for this glad 
message a weary, disillusioned and sin-sick world 
waited and still waits. To the wanderer in life's 
way, who has gone astray like a sheep that is lost, 
you would say: "Return unto the Bishop and Shep- 
herd of your souls." To the wavering, you call, 
"Be ye steadfast." To the fearful, "Be not af 
frighted, but very courageous." To the hopeless, 
"Lift up your hearts." To the sinful, "Repent and 
taste the forgiveness of Clod." To the frustrated 
and broken hearted, "Comfort ye. my people." The 
Church responds gratefully to true evangelism, for 
the Church is composed of people, and people are 
heavy-laden and the burden of their yoke can be 
lifted only by One who invites us to come and find 
our rest in Him. 

Thus history tells its tale. Your record as mis- 
sionaries and evangelists stands true. The story of 
your past is written and not one line of it can be 
erased. The scroll of your experience is rolled up. 
The angel of John's vision stands on a sure founda- 
tion. His left foot rests upon the earth. 

II. And his right foot rests upon the sea. Like 
a Collo>sus he stands. He symbolizes the duality 
of time. The past is finished and in God's keeping. 
"I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the 
ending. " We have sketched the beginning. What 
will the ending be? Like the infinite, unfathomed, 
resounding- sea the future stretches away towards a 
timeless horizon. The sea is the figure of mystery, 
out-reaching human imagination, vastly incompre- 
hensible. "The sea is His, and He made it." It 
speaks to the sold of invisible powers, undiscovered 
depths, transcendent and eternal truths. Here 
stretches your future, on the great deep of the wn- 
known and unseen. If the angel stood with one 
foot upon the sea, upon what spiritual foundation 
will the future of this diocese confidently rest? 



(1) It will rest upon faith, the victorious kind, 
that overcometh the world. We live in an age that 
is inclined to discredit faith because it is erroneously 
supposed to be disassociated from the practical con- 
cerns of life. It is often regarded as a mechanical 
adherence to a creed, "subscription to a philosophi- 
cal abstraction." (The Plain Man Seeks for God," 
Henry P. Van Duren) or mere intellectual consent 
to an outworn, pious formula. This form of religi- 
ousity which is really nothing short of pharasaical 
complacency, is, of course, a grotesque distortion of 
the attitude that Christ commended when He said. 
"Have faith in God." It is only a caricature of the 
real thing. True faith is the upward thrust of a 
man's soul towards God, and the outward thrust of 
his ministering energies towards man. As Skrine, 
the English mystic puts it, "faith is the response of 
the whole personality to its spiritual environment." 
It is the projection God-ward of all that we are, all 
that we possess, and all that we perform. This 
embarrasses and fetters no man's freedom in the 
search for truth, for are we not bidden by Christ 
Himself to "love the lijord our God with all our 
minds." If only the young people of the rising- 
generation would believe this ! If they would only 
accept the fact that it stultifies no intellectual self- 
respect to project life on the superb assumption that 
God is, and that man is never free until his human 
liberties are God-derived! Faith is disciplined by 
reason, balanced by emotion, and practically direct- 
ed. Man's capacity for God has tenacles that reach 
out and apprehend the infinitude of Crod. It is a 
reciprocal relationship. Cod makes His loving over- 
tures and man makes a grateful response. We are 
mysteriously fashioned for this divine fellowship. 
And faith is the means whereby we enter into that 
union of spirits. But union with God is not an 
end in itself. That is only the first and great com- 
mandment. The second is like unto it. A faithful 
lif<-> is a vitalized life, throbbing with a lovable 
humanness, that gets eagerly to work for the good 
of his neighbor. Here is the motive of practical 
Christianity. Here are the resources for applying 
the principles of Christ to a frnstated and hungry 
world. A faithless effort to do good is impractical 
It is even inefficient for it is impossible to minister 
helpfully to one's neighbor unless one loves the Lord 
his Cod. The pracCcal utility of the second com- 
mandment hinges npon the spiritual reality of the 
first commandment. Though I have the pride and 
"will-force which enables a man to do extraordinary 
service to the poor, and to accomplish astounding 
feats of self-mastery and self sacrifice "and have 
not faith, I am like the one who bestows all his 
goods to feed the poor and has not Christian love. 



MAY, 1935 



11 



It profit.eth me nothing." (The Faith of St. Paul, 
D. M. Eoss, p. 156). Of course, "faith without 
works is dead," and work without faith is dead too. 
The faithful Son of Man went about doing good. He 
is not an idle sovereign, sitting enthroned in celes- 
tial inactivity. He moves in and out among us, an 
active, reigning Christ, "WALKING in the midst 
of the seven golden candlesticks." 

More than thirty-five years ago, the late Justice 
Holmes in an. address to the senior class at Harvard 
said: "Yotur education begins when you, yourself, 
have begun to work upon the raw materials for re- 
sults which you do not see. cannot predict, and 
which may be long in coming — when you take the 
problems which life offers you for your appointed 
task. No man has earned the right to claim intel- 
lectual achievement until he has learned to lay his 
course by a star which he has never seen — to dig by 
the divining rod for springs which he may never 
reach. In saying this, I point to that which will 
make your thinking and your life heroic. Thus only 
can you gain the secret joy of the accurate thinker 
who knows that, one hundred years after he is dead 
and forgotten, men who never heard of him will be 
moving in the measure of his thought." (Vital 
Speeches, May, 1935, p. 7) 

If this projection of life upon the unknown is the 
secret of the joy of the accurate thinker, how much 
rather is it the hidden spring of peace in the heart, 
and of power in well doing. Clothed with this peace 
and girded with this power, may your Bishop lead 
you into the thick of modern clashing human wills, 
and all the tumult of a distracted social order, laying 
his course by a star that he cannot see. A hundred 
years from now, men will be moving in the measure 
of his faith. The ugly, hateful things of our blatant, 
grasping age recoil before the stride of such sure- 
footed discipleship. For the world is afraid, and 
gives way to a leader who walks with God. And 
under his leadership, may your Diocese move on 
from year to year and strength to strength, MOVING 
because it is AT REST in Him whose paths are in 
the sea. 



THE PRAYERS USED AT ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, 

GREENVILLE, ON THE FEAST OF EPIPHANY 

IN CELEBRATION OF THE BISHOP'S 

TWENTIETH ANNIVERSARY 



during these twenty years. Praise be unto Thee 
that Thou hast bro'ught him to us, and grant that 
the years of his episcopate may be great in number, 
and that the pious and godly leadership that we have 
known in him, may continue to be our lot, and that 
With the passing of the year's we may grow in our 
love and affection for him until at last we finally 
bring to fru'tion Hit plans that he his laid for ihe 
advancement of Thy Kingdom, and this we ask m 
the name of Thy Son, Jesus Christ, Our Lord. Amen. 
Grant, Lord, to thy servant Thomas, whom 
Thou hast set over Thy flock in this Diocese, the 
spirit of counsel and might, the spirit of wisdom 
and piety, that through the holy conversation of 
their Bishop the devotion of the faithful may in- 
crease, and that the salvation of the flock may be 
the joy and crown of the shepherd, Through Jesus 
Christ Our Lord. Amen. 



Almighty and Everliving God, Who through Thy 
Son, Jesus Christ didst ordain and send forth the 
Blessed Apostles to spread Thy Church throughout 
all the world. Accept our joyful Thanksgiving that 
Thou hast seen fit to permit Thy Servant, Thomas 
of East Carolina, to be our Spiritual guide and ruler 



PRESENTS GAVELS TO HIGH OFFICERS 



Garner And Byrns Receive Gavels Made From Trees 
On Roanoke Island 



Washington, April 29.— On behalf of the Rt, Rev. 
Thomas C. Darst, Bishop of the Diocese of East 
Carolina, Representative Lindsay C. Warren today 
presented gavels to Vice-President John N. Garner 
and Speaker of the House of Representatives, Joseph 
W. Byrns. 

On account of a previous engagement, Bishop 
Darst was unable to be present. The gavels are 
made from trees growing at Sir Walter Raleigh's 
fort on Roanoke Island, North Carolina, and to 
each is attached a silver band, bearing this inscrip- 
tion: 

"Presented to the Congress of the United States 
by the Diocese of East Carolina, commemorating the 
birth of Virginia Dare, first born of English parents 
in North America. Roanoke Island, North Carolina, 
August 18th. 1537." 

Both the Vice-President and the Speaker expressed 
their deep thanks and stated that the gavels would 
be frequently used in both bodies. Mr. Warren 
represents the district in which Fort Raleigh is 
located. 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY DAY AT CAMP LEACH 



The President of the Woman's Auxiliary, Mrs. P. 
L. Outland of Washington, has asked us to announce 
that Wednesday, June 26th, is Auxiliary Day at 
Camp Leach near Washington, N. C. ; and to urge the 
women from all over the Diocese to attend. 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD 



FROM REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF 

FINANCE TO THE ANNUAL 

CONVENTION 



At the January meeting of the Executive Council, 
■the Department of Finance submitted the following- 
tentative budget for the year : 

Expectations 1935 

From General Church $ 2,775.00 

Investments and specials 4,000.00 

Pence Plan 3,840.00 

Parishes and Missions 33,139.09 

Total $43,754.69 

To be appropriated as follows : 

General Church and Provincial 

Synod $ 7,150.00 

Diocesan Administration, General 

and Convention Expense 13,315.00 

Missionary Expense 17.170 00 

Reduction Diocesan Debt 2,600.00 

Margin of Safety 2,200.00 

Contingent Fund 1.319.69 



Total $ 43,754.69 

This lAidget was adopted by the Executive Council 
and we have been operating under it for the last four 
and a half months. On analysis, it would appear to 
(have been a very conservative one. Reported re- 
ceipts from Parishes and Missions were cut $3,500.00 
by the items Margin of Safety and Contingent Funds 
and $2,600.00 of the expected $3,840.00 from the 
Pence Plan was budgeted for debt reduction. 

The remaining $37,635.00 was appropriated for 
Diocesan. General Church purposes from following 
Expectancies : 

From: General Church $ 2,775.00 

Investments and Specials 4.000.00 

Reported Pledges 32,348.00 

Total $39,123.00 

Balance $ 1,488.00 

In additional, if the income from the Pence Plan 
should approximate the amount hoped for by the 
Treasurer, money would be available, not only to 
give to the Missionary Clergy and Lay Workers of 
the Diocese a much needed increase in stipends, but, 
also, a sum would be provided for an extension of 
Diocesan work into unoccupied and waiting fields. 

This budget is not beyond the ability of the Diocese 
if the Parishes and Missions will make an earnest 



effort to collect and forward the amounts promised 
in their Every Member Canvass and if they will get 
behind the Pence Plan with the faith and enthusiasm 
the plan merits. It should be retained as our goal 
for the year. 

Receipts from Parishes and Missions from January 
1st to May 11th total $8,505.17, indicating a total 
for the year of $25,515.41 or $6,833.00 less than re- 
ported Pledges. The Treasurer reports that he has 
forwarded 2,500 Pence Cans to the Parishes and 
Missions. Yet, receipts from this source to date 
amount to only $230.47, $101.25 of which came from 
one Parish. 

Our experience to date this year demonstrates the 
wisdom of the recommendation of the Anniversary 
Committee, that "In order to assure the people of 
the Diocese that no further debt be incurred through 
annual appropriations, no appropriations for any 
year during the next four years shall be in excess of 
the total receipts of the preceding year." In which 
resolution the Department of Finance concurs. 

We shall, however, never satisfactorily solve the 
problem of D'ocesan Finance until we adopt a system 
of fair and equitable quotas throughout the Diocese 
which will not only produce returns adequate for our 
present and future needs, but will also point the way 
to self support to the many places now dependent on 
Diocesan funds. 

We believe that the plan developed by the Chair- 
man of the Field Department meets these conditions 
and that it should be adopted by this Convention. 
The Department recommends : 

First, that for the year 1936 and thereafter until 
changed by order of the Convention that the qV.ota 
of the Parishes and Missions of the Diocese for the 
support of the General Church and Diocesan Work 
shall be based on the plan of the Field Department as 
outlined in its report to this Convention; 

Second, that the Executive Secretary of the Dio- 
cese is hereby instructed to assign to the Parishes 
and Missions of the Diocese before the next Every 
Member Canvass a quota based on this system; 

Third, that the Parishes and Missions here repre- 
sented hereby ajjree to accept the quotas thus assign- 
ed to them as their fair share in the support of the 
work of this Diocese and of the General Church and 
that they severally and individually pledge that their 
individual Parish or Mission will make a Consecrated 
effort to meet the quota assigned. 
Respectfully submitted, 

J. R. TOLAR. Chairman 
Department of Finance. 
May 15. 1935. 



MAY, 1935 



13 



CAMP LEACH 



YOUNG PEOPLE'S SERVICE LEAGUE 



SENIOR CAMP 
JUNE 17th to JUNE 30th. 



Director. Rev. George S. Gresham ; Chaplain, Bish- 
op Darst; Business Manager, Rev. Stephen Gardner; 

Teachers : Rev. John Irwin, New York City ; Rev. 
E. P Moseley, Williamston. N. C. ; Rev. Alexander 
Miller, Wilmington, N. C. ; Rev. Thomas Wright, 
Lexington, Ya. ; Rev. Walter R. Noe, Wilmington, 
N. C. ; Mrs. Charlotte Bailey. Wilmington, N. C. ; 
Bishop Darst, Wilmington, N. C. 

There will be competent leaders in swimming, 
music and dramatics. Experienced leaders will act 
as counsellors for both the boys and girls groups. 
A competent and experienced dietician will have 
charge of the kitchen and the food. A graduate 
nurse will be in the infirmary at all times. 

We want one hundred of the finest young people 
to take advantage of the opportunities which the 
camp affords, and carry back into their parishes the 
spirit of the camp and become real leaders in the 
young people's groups of the Diocese of East 
Carolina. 



CHRIST CHURCH, NEW BERN 



Very interesting was the baptism, held by the R'w. 
C. E. Williams of Christ Church, New Bern, when 
he performed that sacrament for the three grand- 
children of Mrs. Prank S. Duffy, Helen Margaret 
Duffy, Georgia Johnson Duffy and Kathleen Bryan 
Duffy. It was necessary to hold the service at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Prank S. Duffy, due to the 
illness of Mr. Duffy. Instead of the usual silver 
bowl, a unique goblet of a silver mounted cocoanut 
sh'll was used, which was brought over by the great, 
great grandfather of the children, Dr. Charles Duffy, 
who came over in a sailing vessel, from Ireland, in 
1£35. with his eight sons, the youngest of whom was 
the father of Prank S. Duffy, one of the sponsors. 



THE CHURCH BEAUTIFUL 



Bv Genevieve Porter 

The Art of the Church is— The Cathedral. The 
Music of the Church is — Song of the Amrels. The 
Literature of the Church is — The New Testament 
The History of the Church is— Lives of the Saints. 
The Continuity of the Church is — The Sacraments. 



The Command of the Church — Preach the Gospel. 
The Teaching of the Church is — Obedience. The 
Wealth of the Church is — The Membership. The 
Promise of the Church is — Eternal Life. The De- 
fense of the Church is — Holy Writ. The Belief of 
the Church is — The Apostles Creed. The Ideal of 
the Church is — Holiness. The symbol of the Church 
is — The Cross. The Glory of the Church is its — 
Divine Head, Jesus Christ, our Lord. 



IDEAL 

The ideal layman : 

Will have a vital religious experience. Will have 
a sure faith in God. Will have faith in his fellow- 
men. Will believe in the Ch.ui'ch. Will know the 
history of the Church. Will be enthusiastically 
committed to the work of the Church. Will be a 
regular attendant upon the services of the Church. 
Will invest himself in the program of Christian edu- 
cation. Will give systematic and adequate financial 
support to the Church. Will give loyal support to 
his pastor. Will translate his religion into terms of 
service through his daily task. Will be possessed of 
a world-vision. 

— G. L. MORELOCK, in Arkansas Methodist, 



ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION 
( Continued from Page 6) 
Rev. W. R. Noe : 

Executive Secretary Diocesan Convention, 
Beaufort, North Carolina. 

It is a great dissappointemnt that I cannot attend 
Convention and especially that I cannot join in tri- 
bute to our beloved Bishop for whom I have such 
great respect and admiration. Please extend to him 
my love and best wishes for many more years of his 
splendid leadership. 

T. P. DARDEN. 

Beaumont. Texas 
"To the 52nd Annual Convention of the 
Diocese of East Carolina. Beaufort, N. C. 
GREETINGS : 

Inasmuch as I Avas among the first, if not the very 
first, to go to Bishop Darst. immediately after his 
consereation to the Episcopate, seeking his encour- 
agement to enter Holy Orders. I Avish to give a word 
of testimony in appreciation of his Twentieth Anni- 
versary as a genuinely beloved Bishrp in our Mas- 
ter's Church. 

His fatherly treatment of me, and his benign 'n- 
flumee upn my life during the past twenty years. 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD 



have been characteristic of his treatment of all men 
who have gone to him for godly advice and Chris- 
tian helpfulness. 

His affability and urbanity, bis humility and spir- 
itual resourcefulness truly indicate a life hid with 
Christ in God. Such a life manifests itself in sweet- 
ness of temper and disposition in relation to one's 
fellow-man. While in Virginia last summer, I was 
told of an incident in Bishop Darst's life which 
should be preserved : Upon walking up the aisle 
to receive an honorary Doctor in Divinity degree 
from his alma mater, Roanoke College, and to hear 
a citation of his achievements, he was thinking not 
at all of his personal worth or< of a cruel delay in 
human recognition of his qualities. Rather he was 
thinking of his humble days in Salem, Va., when he 
carried ice from door to door. So on his way to 
receive the greatest honor that worthy institution of 
scholarship could confer upon him, he leaned towards 
one of his former ice customers and said gently, 
"Any ice today?" 

May Cod ontinue to bless you in the love and 
companionship of such a man and Bishop, Thomas 
Campbell Dar&t. 

Yours sincerely, 

G. F. CAMERON 



FORWARD! BE OUR WATCHWORD 

(Continued from Page 5) 
of our efforts to wipe ofat the debt over a period of 
four years. The resolutions further provide for a 
committee thoroughly representative of the whole 
diocese. Avhich independently of the Executive Coun- 
cil will during the four years undertake the adminis- 
tration of the Plan. The Executive Council in its 
annual report, elsewhere published in this issue of 
the Herald, has given every reasonable assurance 
that no further debt will be inourred in the future, 
at whatever cost to the work of the diocese. 

If any further defense is needed to justify the 
action of the Convention in this matter, appeal is 
made to pure sentiment, which, as the crown of the 
celebration of the Bishop's Anniversary asks that 
the people set him free as their leader, as far as in 
them lies, from all impossible burdens, that he ma" 
go forward leading his Deople into ever increasing 
fields of usefulness and helpfulness in this diocese 
and throughout the world. LET'S CO! 



BISHOP'S ANNUAL ADDRESS 

("Continued from Page 4) 
manity simply by preaching to the pious few on 
Sunday. It must in the spirit of Jesus lose its con- 
ventionality, break away from its pious, reserved 
respectability and go forward with its Master to 



meet and solve the problems of today. 

The problems of restless youth, impatient with 
things as they are, demanding a new order and a 
new day. 

The problems of a wretched social order that for- 
ces millions of men to walk the streets and roads 
of the world, asking for a chance to live. 

The problems of a world filled with hate and 
.selfishness and fear, trembling on the brink of 
dreadful war. 

I believe with all my soul that the Church of the 
living God, consecrated to its task, appropriating 
the promised power, moving forward under the 
leadership of Jesus, can solve every problem that 
threatens the peace of the world today; that it can 
enlist its youth in the great adventure of redemption ; 
that it can so permeate society with its divine pur- 
pose that justice will be restored to its rightful place 
and men made in His image lifted from their degra- 
dation and placed upon that secure road over which 
as sons of God they may walk into the promised 
land of their heritage. 

In the name of our Master Christ, I call upon 
you to go forward today; to cast aside every weight 
of selfishness and indifference and fear and doubt; 
to go forward to certain victory. 

The road is hard; the enemy is real and deter- 
mined ; the battle is ours ; the power and the victory 
is God's. 

Strong in the strength which God supplies through 
His eternal Son; Ave cannot fail. 



KANUGA 

(Continued from Page 2) 
important part of the mission of the church. But 
to teach in a church school is to become aware of 
one's ignorance both as to content and to method. 
Again the Summer Conference comes to the rescue. 
For our information and inspiration there are the 
courses mentioned above, and for methods in teach- 
ing, there are numerous classes covering every phase 
of church shool life and tamght by experts on these 
lines. 

Next is the opportunity for Auxiliary women to 
inform themselves of the purpose and plans of the 
organization itself. CoMrses for younger as well 
as for more experienced leaders are given by one of 
the secretaries from headquarters who also holds 
herself in readinss at any time for conference with 
individuals. There are two general conferences at 
which women may compare notes, telling of their 
successes and their failures and often getting valu- 
able suggestions in an informal way. There is al- 
ways a course on the subject for study during the 
coming year which is most helpful especially to 



MAY, 1935 



15 



educational secretaries. Auxiliary Day which brings 
together women from many dioceses is not only a 
very pleasant experience but one which helps to give 
us a wider idea of the association which binds us 
together in a common service. It would give great 
impetus to the work of the Auxiliary in every de- 
partment if some of the diocesan and district officers 
could be present each year for the whole conference 
period. 

Indeed it would mean great things in the life of 
the church, if year by year, men and women from 
each of the parishes, eager to bring their minds to 
the service of their religion, would go out to this 
quiet spot to spend a while in wholesome Christian 
fellowship, talking together of the things concerning 
the kingdom of God. Those who love Kanuga, love 
to liken it to the sea of Galilee — as we walk by its. 
shores, quickened and aroused by our fuller know- 
ledge of these things, it may be that we too may 
hear clearly the call to discipleship, and gladly 



answering, may learn the purpose of God for our 
lives. 

CAROLINE PORCHER CAIN 



IN MEMORIAM 



Resolutions on the death of Mrs. Joana Wooten 
Herring, who for 66 years was a faithful and devoted 
member of St. Mary's Church and the Woman's 
Auxiliary. She was a liberal contributor to all its 
causes and needs, and deeply interested in the ex- 
tension of Christ's Kingdom. Therefore be it re- 
solved that they have lost a valuable member. 
"Father in thy gracious keeping 
Leave we now thy servant sleeping." 

MRS. FANNIE W. MOSELEY 
MISS DORA MILLER 
MISS JUNIE WHITFIEiLD 
MRS. C. B. WOODLEY. 



STATEMENT OF THE AMOUNTS PAID BY THE PAKI SHES AVD MISSIONS FOR DIOCESAN AND GENERAL, 

CHURCH WORK, JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1935. 



Parishes 

Beaufort, St. Paul's I 

Clinton, St. Paul's 

Fayetteville, St. John's ••• 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 

Hope Mills, Christ Church 

Kinston, St. Mary's 

New Bern, Christ Church 

Red Springs, St. Stephen's . . 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents .. 

Southport, St. Philip's . . . 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd 

Wilmington, St. James* 

Wilmington St. John's 

Wilmington, St. Paul's 

Organized Missions. 

Burgaw, St. Mary's 

Faison, St. Gabriel's 



Parishes 

Aurora, Holy Cross 

Ayden, St. James' 

Bath, St. Thomas' 

Belhaven, St. James' 

Bonnerton, St. John's 

Chocowinity. Trinity 

Columbia, St. Andrew's 

Creswell, St. David's 

Edenton, St. Paul's 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church 

Farmville, Emmanuel 

Gatesville, St. Mary's 

Greenville, St. Paul's 

Grifton, St. John's 

Hamilton, St. Martin's 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 

Jessama, Zion 

Lake landing-. St. Georere's .. 

Plymouth, Grace Church 

Roper, St. Luke's 

Washington, St Peter's 

Williamston, Advent 



CONVOCATION OF WILMINGTON. 



Expec- 
tations 

365.20 

50.00 

2,150.00 

1.000.00 

60.00 
1.000.0C 
2.125.00 

55.00 

200.00 
169.60 

371.40 
9 781.50 
2,031.60 
1,200.00 



35.00 
65.00 



Paid to 
May 25th 

I 29.45 

50.00 

484.54 

181.01 

30.00 

500.00 

446.24 

38.00 

14. 87 

71.18 

31.41 

3,994.18 

731.74 

310.06 



6.52 
10 25 



Liumberton, Trinity 

North West, All Soul's.... 

Pikevi'le. St. George's 
Trenton, Grace Church ... 

Vanceboro, St. Pauls 

Whiteville, Grace Church . , 
Wrightsville, St. Andrews 



Unorganized Missions. 

Jasper, St. Thomas' 

Pollooksville, Mission 

Wilmington, Delgado Mission 



Parochial Missions. 

Campbellton. St. Philip's . . 
Tolar-Hart, Good Shepherd. 



Total 



CONVOCATION OF EDENTON 



250.00 

300.00 

35.00 

350.00 

100 00 

100.00 

200.00 

300.00 

1,559 80 

1,008.76 

23S.20 

128.no 

1.356.20 

200.00 

65.00 

400 on 

inn. 00 

?nn nn 

200. no 

75.00 

1,500.00 

100.00 



52 60 



19.83 
67.38 

500.00 

503 S2 
65.00 
14 52 

628.50 

8.10 

3-2.50 

116.67 
•27.50 
35. IS 
87.61 
31.93 

462 50 
8 6.19 



Windsor, St Thomas'... 

Winton. St. John's 

Woodviile, Grace Church 



Organized Missions 

Ahoskie St. Thomas' 

Fairfield, All Saints' 

Murfreesboro, St. Barnabas' 

Roxobel. St. Mark's , 

Sladesville, St. John's ... 
Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' . 
Snnbury, St. Peter's 
Swan Quarter, Calvary . . . 
Winterville, St. Luke's 
Yeatesville, St. Matthew's 

Unorganized Missions. 

Avoca, Holy Innocents' . 
Camden, St. Joseph's 



Total 



Expec- 


Paid to 


tations 


May 25th 


174.00 


56.00 


10.00 


2.94 


20.00 




15 00 




30.00 


6.07 


100.00 


50.00 


6.00 


8.75 


20.00 




20.00 




10.00 


5.00 


25.00 


8.37 


70.00 


53.68 


$ 21,159.30 


$ 7,103.49 


225.00 


70.81 


100.00 


21.67 


150.00 


68.79 


55.00 




10.00 




30.00 


9.67 


■ 9? 08 


35.55 


10.00 




100.00 




42.00 


27 82 


20.00 




125.00 


75.00 


20.00 




80.00 




10.00 


5.00 


% 9.S35.04 


$ 3,054.47 



CONVOCATION OF COLORED CHURCH WORKERS 



Parishes 

■Pavetteville, St. Joseph's 

N^w "Rern. St. Cywian's 

Wilmington, St. Mark's 

Organised Missions 

Belhaven. St. Mary's •••■••• 
Edenton. St. John-Evangelist 
FUzabeth City, St. PhiUp's . . 

Goldsboro. St. Andrew's 

Kinston, St. Augustine's 

Washington, St. Paul's ,,..-,. 



104.00 
420 00 
140.00 



105.00 

]m on 

20.15 

60. no 

75.00 
120.00 



175.00 
121. IS 



10 oo 

37 '2 

1.75 

S.74 

?0 9fi 

23.36 



Unorganized Missions. 

Aurora, St. Jude's 

Beaufort. St. Clement's 

Greenville, St. Andrew's 

Haddock's Cross Roads, St. Stephen' 

Boner. St. Ann's 

Wilmington, "Brooklyn" Mission.. 
Wrightsville, St. Augustine's 



Total 





43.00 


3 00 




4 


S.00 




30.00 






30.00 


1.66 




26.00 






20.00 


6.50 




20.00 


6.50 


$ 


1.354.15 $ 


432.17 



Grand Total $32,348.49 $ 10.590.13 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD 



VIRGINIA EPISCOPAL 
SCHOOL 

LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 

Prepares boys for College and University. Splen- 
did environment and excellent corps of teachers. 
High standard in scholarship and athletics. Healthy 
I and beautiful location in the mountains of Virginia. 
Charges exceptionally low. For catalog apply to: 



REV. OSCAR deWOLF RANDOLPH 



RECTOR 



McCONNELL & CAUSEY 

FOR SERVICE 

Good'Year Tires Exide Batteries 

Quaker State Lubrication 

Telephone 827 Uth and Market Sts. 

Wilmington, N. C. 






| Form of Bequest I 

I ~ I 

I hereby, give, devise, and bequeath to J 

! I 

■ the Trustees of the Protestant Episcopal j 

I I 

f Church in the Diocese of East Carolina \ 



j to be held by them in trust for. 



I 
j 



* — 



.*. — , 



ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Conducted for Negro Youth under the auspices of the Epis- 
copal Church. 

A four year accredited College Course is offered, leading to 
degrees of B. A. and B. S., including Pre-Medical work and 
Teacher Training for State High School Teachers' certificates. 

A College Preparatory Department, Training School for Nurses 
and School for Religious and Social Workers are connected with 
the College. 

Thorough training, healthy environment, Christian influences. 
For Catalog and information write — 

The Registrar 
ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE, RALEIGH, N. C. 



, — , — „ , — + 




FOR ALL COLDS USE 

VAPOR SALVE - - 25c 
NOSE AND THROAT DROPS 35c 

MANUFACTURED BY 

FLURENE CHEMICALS, Ltd. 
Washington, North Carolina 

* * 

4-PLY CROCHET YARN 
50c PER POUND 

WRITE US FOR SPECIAL CLUB 
RATES IN 50-LB. LOTS 

TOLAR, HART & HOLT MILLS 

FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. i 

4 . „_„.£ 

* , 



Meares Insurance Agency 

108 Princess Street 
Wilmington, N. C. 

„ , ,_ + 



»— + 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 
JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

An Episcopal School for girls — Have your daughter 
receive her education in a church school. 

Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, B. S., 
Principal 

Saint Mary's offers 4 years' High School and 2 
years' College work all fully accredited by the South- 
ern Association. Also courses in Music, Art, Ex- 
pression, Home Economics, and Business. 

20-Acre Campus. Gym and Field Sports. Tennis. 
Indoor Tiled Swimming Pool. Horseback 
Riding. Golf 

A. W. TUCKER, Business Manager. 



D -2.rs.^ 



Chapel niJ-»- , 



•7/ 



J '55 






"-W 




THE MISSION HERALD 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTE ON THE STATE 
OF THE CHURCH 



Reverend Father in God, and delegates assembled, 
we beg leave to submit the Report of the Committee 
on the State of the Church. 

This, the fifty-second year of the life of our Dio- 
cese, and the twentieth year of the Episcopate of 
our Bishop, seems to mark a turning of the tide from 
the ebb of depression to the flow of renewed activity 
and achievement. Since 1929 we have heard reports 
of repeated curtailment in activity and accomplish- 
ment but this year is indicative of an encouraging 
change. Instead of retreat, we can report advance 
along the line and take courage therefrom. 

In 1933 we reached the lowest ebb of contributions, 
having fallen to a sum which was $120,897.67 under 
the peak offering of 1926, but still the offering of 
1933 was in excess of the offering in 1919. when we 
were enjoying a period of comparative prosperity, 
but before we had experienced the stimulating effect 
of the Nation- Wide Campaign. During the past year 
the people of the Diocese of East Carolina contribu- 
ted for all church purposes the sum of $115,967.03, 
which represented an increase of $3,808.96 over the 
previous year. The physical property of the Diocese 
was increased in value to the extent of $14,673, 
bringing the total valuation of the property of the 
Church in East Carolina to $1,745,285.00. 

It might be of interest for us to compare the con- 
dition of the Diocese today with its condition when 
our beloved Bishop was consecrated. 

1914 Communicants 5,389 

1934 Communicants 7,154 

1914 Baptized Persons 9,722 

1934 Baptized Persons 10,010 

1914 Number of Church Edifices 93 

1931 Number of Church Edifices 117 

68 



1914 Church Schools 

1931 Church Schools 

1914 Teachers 

1934 Teachers 



67 

492 
490 



1914 Pupils 4 068 

1934 Pupils 4,245 

1914 Crand Total of Expenses $-0 377.78 
1934 Grand Total of Expenses $114.283 23 

1914 Number of Clergy 32 

1934 Number of Clergy 43 

Considering the apparently small increase in com- 
municants, in spite of the fact that our Bishop has 



confirmed over 7,000 persons during the last twenty 
years, let us try to analyze the statistics, and deter- 
mine where and how the great loss occurred. 

Communicant strength 1914 5,389 

Confirmed since 1914 (appx.) 7,000 

Total 12,389 12,389 

Lost by death 1,839 

Lost by transfer 2,493 

Dropped from parish lists 4,247 



Total 8,579 

Less those "added otherwise "__2, 870 



Net Loss 



5,709 5,709 



Communicant strength of Diocese 

should be 6,630 

The actual Communicant strength of the Diocese 
is 7,154. Thus, we have 474 communicants in the 
Diocese which are unaccounted for in the statistics. 
It seems that the number "dropped from the parish 
lists" is unreasonably large. To have 4,247 com- 
municants unaccounted for shows a great weakness 
in our system of keeping track of our churchmen. 
Even if we allow for the difference in those trans- 
ferred, and those added "otherwise", we still have 
a net loss of 3 870 communicants absolutely unac- 
counted for. This represents 28% of the gains of 
our church. It is high time that something be done 
to correct this matter. It is proposed by your commit- 
tee that this Convention instruct the committee on 
Canons to draft a Canon placing the responsibility 
for the transfer of communicants on the Rector, or 
Priest in Charge, of a parish or mission, and for this 
Convention to memorialize the General Convention 
to amend General Church Canon 42 (1931) I (iii), to 
make it mandatory for the Rector of a Parish to 
transfer a communicant who has removed to another 
Parish. And, furthermore, that this convention in- 
struct the Committee on Canons to submit an amend- 
ment to Canon 22. See. I. (1) to provide that at the 
time of the Annual Visitation of the Bishop, the par- 
ish Register shall be submitted to him for his exam- 
ination, that he may determine that it is properly 
kept all communicants accounted for, and that the 
entries are properly indexed. 

The matter of insurance is one to cause grave con- 
cern. Our Parochial Reports for this year show 
that the following places carry no insurance on their 
buildings: St. John's, Bonnerton ; St. John's, Grif- 
ton: Zion, Jessama ■ St. Luke's. Roper; St. Paul's, 
(Continued on Page 13) 



The Mission Herald 



VOLUME XLIX 



WILMINGTON, N. C, JUNE- JULY, 1935 



NUMBER 6-7 



BISHOP'S LETTER 



As my Annual Address to the Diocesan Conven- 
tion took the place of my usual letter in the May issue 
of the Mission Herald, I will now take up the record 
of my activities from May the first. 

On Sunday morning, May 5th, I preached and con- 
firmed six persons, presented by the rector, Rev. Ste- 
phen Gardner in St. Peter's Church, Washington. 

in the afternoon I dedicated the Memorial Organ 
and made an address in the Broun Memorial Chapel. 
In the evening, I preached and confirmed nine pet- 
sons presented by the rector, Rev. E, F. Moseley, in 
the Church of the Advent, Williamston. 

On Friday, the 10th. at 7:00 P. M., I made an ad- 
dress to the Ahoskie Kiwanis Club, and at 8:00 P. 
M., I preached in St. Thomas' Church, Ahoskie. 

On Saturday, the 11th, 1 baptized an infant in St. 
Barnabas' Church, Murfreesboro, at 10:30 A. M. and 
preached and confirmed three persons, presented by 
the rector. Rev. J. L. M alone, at 11 :00 A. M. 

On Sunday, the 12th, at 11 :00 A. M., I preached 
in St. Mary's, Catesville. 

In the afternoon 1 preached in St. Peter's, Sun- 
bury, and at night I preached in St. John's Church, 
Winton. 

On the night of Tuesday, the 14th, after witnessing 
a pageant conducted by the young people of St 
Paul's Church. Beaufort, I presided at a meeting of 
the Diocesan Executive Council in the Auditorium 
of St. Paul's School, Beaufort, 

Words almost fail me when I attempt to record the 
happenings of Wednesday, the 15th, as the day was 
truly a Red Letter Day in my life and ministry. 

The facts of that day have already been recorded 
in the May issue of the Mission Herald, but of course 
it was impossible to describe the spirit that charac- 
terized that wonderful opening meeting of our Con- 
vention. The outstanding events were the beautiful 
and impressive sermon delivered by my good friend, 
the Bishop of North Carolina ; the presentation of the 
exquisite Loving Cup and Book of Remembrance in 
the name of my dear people, by the Rev. Charles 
A. Ashby. who entered the ministry under my rec- 
torship in Newport News twenty-five years ago, and 
who placed my name before the Diocesan Conven- 
tion of East Carolina in October, 1924. 

The stirring address of Dr. Milton, in which he pre- 
sented so clearly and enthusiastically the plans for 



paying off our Diocesan debt in the next four years. 
Dr. Milton's splendid vision and compelling leader- 
ship was never more beautifully demonstrated than in 
that fine presentation that should have the loyal sup- 
port of every person in the Diocese. 

Then came the hour of fellowship and feasting 
when we had the privilege of greeting the hundreds 
of men and women and children who had come from 
every section of the Diocese to share in the Anniver- 
sary Services. 

I can never tell you just how much that day meant 
to me, but I am sure you must realize how humbly 
grateful I am for all of your loyalty and love. I thank 
Cod that I have been permitted to serve you during 
the past twenty years, and I go forward with fresh 
courage and renewed faith because of your confidence 
and trust so beautifully expressed through your gifts 
and above all, through your loyal friendship. 

If all goes well, 1 expect to sail for England on the 
S. S. Pennland of the Red Star Line from New York 
on July 20th and am planning to return early in 
September. The trip will be doubly enjoyable be- 
cause I will be traveling as the guest of my beloved 
people of East Carolina. 

Following the Convention, I visited Holy Inno- 
cents' Church, Lenoir County, on Sunday, the 19th, 
where I preached, celebrated Holy Communion, and 
confirmed nine persons, presented by the rector. 
Rev. A. C. D. Noe, at 11 :00 A. M. 

In the afternoon, we had a most interesting Y. P. 
S. L. District Meeting. 

On Thursday, the 23rd, I preached at the One Hun- 
dredth Anniversary of Christ Church Parish, Fair- 
mont, W. Va., where I began my ministry thirty- 
three years ago. 

On Sunday, the 26th, at 11:00 A. M.. I preached 
and confirmed three persons, presented by the Rev. 
W. R. Noe, in St. Paul's Church, Clinton. 

In the evening I preached and confirmed three per- 
sons, presented by the rector, Rev. A. H. Marshall, in 
St. Philip's Church, Southport. 

On Tuesday, the 28th, I attended the Commence- 
ment exercsies and meeting of the Trustees of St. 
Mary's School. Raleigh. 

On Wednesday, the 29th. I attended the Com- 
mencement exercises and meeting of the Trustees 
of St. Augustine's College, Raleigh. 

On Thursday, the 30th, I attended the luncheon in 
honor of Canon Waddy and Sir Edward Midwinter. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



representatives of the Ancient English Society for the 
Propagation of the Gospel, in Raleigh. 

On Sunday, June the 2nd, at 11 :00 A. M., I preach- 
ed, confirmed four persons, presented by the rector, 
Rev. Dr. Huske, and celebrated Holy Communion, in 
St. Mary's Church, Kinston. 

In the afternoon, I preached in Grace Church, Tren- 
ton. On Monday, the 3rd, I attended the Commence- 
ment exercises at Duke University, where I was hon- 
ored with the Degree of Doctor of Divinity. 

From June 6th to 11th, I attended Trustee meetings 
and Commencement exercises at the University of 
the South, Sewanee, T'enn. 

On Friday, the 14th, in Trinity Church, Lumber- 
ton, I ordained James D. Beckwith to the Diaconate. 
The sermon was preached by the Rev. John Q. Beck- 
with, Jr. of Hillsboro, N. C. The Candidate was pre- 
sented by the Rev. Wm. M. Latta. 

The Celebrant was the Rev. Stephen Gardner, Pres- 
ident of the Standing Committee 

Other Clergy present were the Rev. Messrs. Alex- 
ander Miller, E. W. Halleck, W. R. Noe, Howard Al- 
ligood and Edward Bethea. 

On Sunday, the 16th. at 11 :00 A. M., I preached in 
St. Gabriel's Church, Faison, and was assisted in the 
service by our newly ordained Deacon, Rev. James 
D. Beckwith, who has. been assigned to the Churches 
in Clinton, Faison and Burgaw. 

On the evening of the i6th, I participated in a 
Memorial Service to the Rev. John E. Huhn in the 
Church of the Good Shepherd, Wilmington. "Jack" 
Huhn, who was one of my classmates at the Virginia. 
Theological Seminary, entered the ministry from the 
Church of the Good Shepherd. 

After his graduation from the Seminary, he went to 
Alaska as a misisonary where he served with great 
faithfulness until his death three years later. The 
small cross that marked his grave in Alaska has been 
replaced by a stone cross, and the original cross, 
erected by his devoted Indian parishioners was sent; 
to his home parish., where it now has an honored 
place on the Chancel wall. 

This has been a somewhat longer letter than usual, 
but as it may be my last letter until September, I am 
sure yon will not mind its length. 

With loving gratitude to every member of our Dio- 
cesan family. I am 

Faithfully and affectionately, 

Your friend and Bishop, 

THOMAS C. DARST. 



JAMES D. BECKWITH ORDAINED DEACON 



Impressive and Beautiful Service Conducted by Bish- 
op Darst and Visiting Clergyman. 



Sermon Preached by Candidate's Brother 



The Rev. Worth Wicker has been appointed Chap- 
lain of the 113th Field Artillery of the North Caro- 
lina National Guard. Mi-. Wicker holds the rank of 
Captain. 



Lumberton, N.C. — Mr. James D. Beckwith was or- 
dained to the Sacred Order of Deacons by Rt. Rev. 
T. C. Darst, Bishop of the East Carolina Diocese, in 
an impressive and beautiful service at Trinity Epis- 
copal Church here Friday at 11 a. m. His brother, 
Rev. J. Q. Beckwith of Hillsboro, who was ordained 
to the order of deacons by Bishop Darst in the same 
church almost exactly four years ago, on June 1 !., 
1931, preached the sermon. 

Both are sons of Mr. and Mrs. J. Q. Beckwith of 
Lumberton, who were leaders in the organization of 
Trinity Episcopal Church here some 20 odd years ago 
and have been its loyal supporters through the years. 
It was a most unusual occasion, with but few, if any, 
parallels in the history of the denomination in the 
state. 

The candidate was presented by Rev. William Lat- 
ta, rector of the church. Rev. Edward Bethea of 
Rockingham read the epistle, the 6th chapter of Acts, 
beginning with the second verse, and Rev. Alexander 
Miller of St. Paul's, Wilmington, read the Litany for 
ordination. Rev. Stephen Gardner, rector of St. Pe- 
ter's Washington, N. C. president of the Standing 
Committee of the diocese, conducted the communion 
service. Other Episcopal ministers here for the or- 
dination were: Rev. W. R. Noe of Wilmington, ex- 
ecutive secretary of the diocese; Rev. Howard Alli- 
good of Fayetteville, Rev. E. W. Halleck, rector of 
St. John's, AVilmington, Rev. Henry Johnson of Tar- 
boro. 

A vested choir made up from choirs of all the 
churches of Lumberton took part in the service. Mrs 
T. A. McNeill was organist. Thj Orucifer, bearing 
the Cross and leading the procession as it entered and 
left the church, was Master John IT. Benton of Lum- 
Lerron. A feature of the song serine was the offer- 
tory, "The Lord is My Shepherd," ,*. duet sung by 
Mrs. J. Q. Beckwith and Mi^s Evalina Beckwith, 
i"0' her and sister of :he eand'date. The offering, as 
on all occasions. Bishop Darst announced, goes to aid 
deserving students preparing for the ministry. 

Mr. Beckwith who received the Bachelor of Divin- 
ity degree from the Protestant Episcopal Theological 
seminary of Virginia two weeks ago and is also a B. 
A. graduate of the University of the South, at Sewa- 
nee, Tenn.. will have charge of churches at Clinton, 
Burgaw and Faison. He was introduced at Faison 
Sunday by Bishop Darst. 



JUNE- JULY, 1935 



Confirmation 

During the service Miss Eleanor McNeill, daughter 
of Solicitor and Mrs. T. A. McNeill of Lumberton, 
was confirmed by the bishop. 

Ministers of other denominations present for the 
service were: Dr. G. E. Moorehouse, former pastor 
of the First Presbyterian church of Lumberton, of 
Lauringhurg, accompanied by Mrs. Moorehouse ; 
Revs. I. P. Hedgpeth and J. M. Fleming, Baptist min- 
isters. Rev. 0. C. Melton, pastor of Lumberton circuit, 
and Mr. Archie Ward, Baptist ministerial student of 
Lumberton. 

Out-of-town visitors besides those mentioned above, 
included Mrs. Chas. D. Calhoun of New York City; 
Mesdames W. N., Sam and Belle Ray Tillinghast, Miss 
Mary McNeill, Mr. Lamont King of Fayetteville ; Mr. 
Cecil Alligood of the University of the South, Sewa- 
nee, Tenn. ; Mrs. S. R. Clary of Fairmont ; Miss F. J. 
Melton of Washington, D. C. ; Messrs. W. L. Hurley 
and L. C. Johnson of Hope Mills ; Mr. W. H. Stewart 
of St. Paul's. 

Sets Highest Mark 

''Be ye therefore perfect, even as your Father, 
which is in heaven is perfect," Matthew 5 :48, was the 
ambitious text from which Rev. J. Q. Beckwith 
preached the sermon for the ordination of his bro- 
ther by human ties as well as his brother in Christ. 
He brought a well-reasoned, earnest message in 
which he stressed an adequate vision of the potenti- 
alities of life as the greatest need of human life to- 
day. "'We human beings," he quoted, ''are as much 
engaged in trying to find out what we want as in 
trying to get it.'' Sometimes a whole life is thrown 
away, he said in vain pursuit of something which 
one discovers, when too late, that he does not want. 

The most shocking feature of unemployment today, 
he said, is not the fact that men are without jobs, 
frightful as that is; nor is it even the fact that they 
are denied the necessities of life, though that is in- 
tolerable in a Christian community; but the most 
shocking thing is that human society is telling men 
that the world has no use for them, and there is no 
place for them in Cod's universe, that they are su- 
perfluous. 

Two Essentials 

A vision of the potentialities of the individual life 
and new confidence in the ultimate trmmph or 
Christ's dominion are two supreme needs of the day. 
said Mr. Beckwith. A thoroughly disillusioned 
world has seen too many noble experiments, idealistic 
schemes, visionary programs, abandoned as impracti- 
cal. The very name '"idealism" is scorned; the 
thought of human excellence is ridiculed: dreams of 
a perfect order are lauehed at. "We indulge no high 



expectations toward life today. From our own bit- 
ter experience we have become a practical people. 
In an imperfect world men and women are endeavor- 
ing to be content to make an imperfect way." 

"The trouble is, we have been depending upon our- 
selves, consulting our own resources, relying on our 
own strength. It is about time we turned to the 
strength, the resources, the power of God." Mr. 
Beckwith concluded with a simple, intimate and 
practical charge to "my brother Jim", expressing 
his own happiness in that his younger brother had 
chosen the profession in which he would be happy 
and would find a broad field for service to humanity, 
and through which he might find perfection. 

— The Robesonian 



ADVANCE WORK PROJECT FOR 1935 



The ' women of East Carolina in their Advance 
Work project for 1935 are lending a helping hand 
to Miss Helen Skiles at The House of Light in Japan. 
The House of Light is situated on the border of the 
city of Kyoto in the semi-rural district of Matsuga- 
saki. 

Miss Skiles began Evangelistic Missionary work in 
Japan in 1922. She is from St. Peter's Church, 
Uniontown, Pennsylvania, in the Diocese of Pitts- 
burgh. She was eelucated at the Union High School, 
anel the Deaconess School of Philaelelphia. 

When Miss Skiles first began work in the district 
of Matsugasaki, she useel her own rented house. 
About three years ago she conceived the idea of mov- 
ing the unused parish house of St. Mary's church in 
Kyoto to the present site. Bishop Nichols apprecia- 
ted the work Miss Skiles was doing so much he readi- 
ly approved and borrowed the money. 

The building is equipped for a Kindergarten, for 
classes for older children, meetings of women and 
occasionally meetings of the men. It is truly a House 
of Light situated in a community that greatly needs 
the ministry and teaching of our Church. 

The Kindergarten has made a decided impression 
on the community. Recently the followers of Bud- 
dha in that vicinity decided to start a Kindergarten 
of their own. In one home the Oban San (grand- 
mother) insisted that her granddaughter go to the 
Buddhist Kindergarten. This was done but not with 
the approval of the child's father and mother. 

After a time the child returned to Miss Skiles 
Kindergarten. Upon investigation it was learned 
that the grandmother, as a result of the experience 
of the child for three or four weeks in the Buddhist 
Kindergarten, had decided that the "Kindergarten 
with the ci'oss was best." 



THE MISSION HERALD 



cr/HE FORWARD niOUEItlETlT 



The work of the Forward Movement was stressed 
in many of the Diocesan Conventions which met in 
April and May. In his Convention address the, 
Bishop of New York called attention to the times 
of confusion, uncertainty and fear in which we are 
living and reminded the Convention of the great 
opportunity thus given to the Church and the 
desperate need of the world for the message of the 
Gospel. He called upon his people to let the For- 
ward Movement express itself in new life and in 
new devotion to the cause of Christ and urged the 
faithful use of the Forward Movement daily helps 
to Christian living. 

The Bishop of Western Massachusetts hailed the 
Forward Movement with joyful and enthusiastic 
welcome because it proposed first of all a re-con- 
version, a renewal and perfecting of individual dis- 
cipleship and suggested the possibility to his 
clergy that the call of a re-consecration of every 
follower of Jesus Christ might be presented in a 
personal interview to every soul in his Diocese. He 
concluded his address by saying, "I shall give to 
it (The Forward Movement) all my power, begin- 
ning, please God, with myself." 

The Bishop of Eastern North Carolina summoned 
the people of his Diocese to a renewal of spiritual 
energy, casting off sloth, indifference and worldli- 
ness. "I believe with all my soul." he said "that 
the Church of the living God, consecrated to its task, 
appropriating the promised power, moving forward 
under the leadership of Jesus can solve every prob- 
lem that threatens the peace of the world today; 
that it can enlist its youth in the great adventure 
of redemption: that it can so permeate society 
with its divine purpose that justice will be restored 
to its rightful place and men made in His image 
lifted from their degradation and placed on that 
sure road over which as sons of 4~!od they may walk 
into the promised land of their heritage. In the 
name of our Master Christ 1 call you to go forward 
today." 

The Bishop of Western New York made the For- 
ward Movement in that diocese the subject of the se- 
cond part of his Convention address, outlining a very 
effective program for putting the Forward Move- 
ment into effect in the diocese. After the Rev. 
Arthur M. Sherman of the Staff of the Forward 
Movement had presented the general aspects of the 
Movement to the Convention, Bishop Davis sent thd 
following message to the Chairman of the Commis- 
sion : "Tell Bishop Hobson the Diocese of Western 
New York is wholeheartedly with the Forward 



Movement and pledges its enthusiastic support". 
A commission already in existence on Religious Re- 
vival was changed to the Commission on the For- 
ward Movement. 

The convention of the Diocese of Montana passed 
a resolution thanking the promoters of the Forward 
Movement for "that splendid pamphlet", Disciples 
of the Living Christ, and expressed the hope that 
some such devotional literature might be made 
available for all of next year. Montana is earnestly 
striving to make the Forward Movement a reality 
in the diocese and to that end the convention was 
greatly helped by the presence and inspiring mes- 
sage of Bishop Cross, one of the members of the 
Commission. 

The Diocese of Mississippi holds its convention 
in January, but held a clergy conference in May 
with the Forward Movement as its dominant theme, 
emphasizing the need of strengthening and deepen- 
ing the spiritual life of the individual and the home 
circle. Bishop Bratton gave the principal address 
of Avhieh one of the clergy reports: "A wonderful 
heart to heart talk, as the Bishop always gives . . . 
but ... to us this talk lifted us up more than usual. 
The Bishop took the Forward Movement and every 
part of it . . . lifted it up . . . and placed it on the 
Altar. Money giving, Time giving, all . . . wero 
lifted up to the Heavenly Father. We, ourselves 
... all we have . . . comes from the Father. Bishop 
Green outlined the program in mind (1) the carrying 
out of the Forward Movement; (2) Whitsunday Of- 
fering; (3) Assisting in the Laymen's League." 
Something is Happening in the Church 
A group of priests were recently talking together 
of the unusually large congregations sine? Easter 
in the city where they serve, and of the us? of the 
Forward Movement leaflets, when one of them broke 
forth with the remark, "Something is happeniiv.;- 
in the Church". A clergyman in the Diocese of 
Ohio in a personal letter to a friend, who is a mem- 
ber of the Joint Commission on the Forward Move- 
ment, rejoices in the fact of a vigorous spirit of 
fresh life in his parish. "I present twenty-two 
more adults for confrmation on Monday (eighty- 
two already presented this year) and have already 
started class three. This Forward Movement is ail 
riant. Keep it up. Get something started in the 
fall." And he suggests emphasis on Church atten- 
dance, discussion classes, men's visitation of par- 
ishes and clergy calling. Something is happening 
in that parish and it has evidently begun with the 
rector himself. Not the least amon^ the encour- 



JUNE- JULY, 1935 



aging signs is the spirit of revival among the clergy. 
A priest writes of his gratitude for the Forward 
Movement: "I want to express my appreciation for 
the tremendous impulse joining the Forward Move- 
ment has given to my spiritual life. To me, disci- 
pleship brings the on]y meaning there can be in the 
Christian Church. I thank God that you and your 
group are pressing forward in the simple challenge 
to all of us towards looking at the matter frankly 
and without institutional or theological bias." 

Laymen Move Forward in Texas 
As a step towards reinvigorating the life of the 
Church there are being held all over the Diocese of 
Texas district meetings of laymen at which the lay- 
men themselves do all the talking. Bishop Quia 
gives an example of what is happening — "Laymen 
from eight congregations came together at our last 
meeting in the town of Bellville, a town of 2,000 
people. I will have a meeting on the 20th of May 
with about ten congregations represented in another 
part of the Diocese and still another on the 5th vf 
June at another point". We spot five or more lay- 
men to speak on "What the Church means to me" 
and "W T hat I as an individual member can mean 
to the Church". That warms the boys up and moot 
of them join in the discussion. The men drive any- 
where from 20 to 60 miles to the meetings. I am 
going to ask them to do one definite piece of work 
this summer for all the laymen of the Diocese and 
that is to read the new Forward Movement pamphlet 
which is out just after Whitsunday." 

A Rule of Life 

As a result of the widespread use of the pamphlet. 
on Discipleship, and in response to a request for a 
rule of life for lay people, the Diocese of Maryland 
has proposed some simple rules, one of which is to 
read a book on the Christian religion monthly. The 
books suggested are of timeless value and have 
helped in forming Christian character for centimes. 
They are "The Confessions of St. Augustine"; "The 
Imitation of Christ" by Thomas A. Kempis; "The 
Spiritual Combat" by Scupoli ; "The Devout Life" 
by St. Francis de Sales: "Holy Living" by Jeremy 
Taylor; and "The Practice of the Presence of God" 
by Brother Lawrence. 

Individualise the Eooklet "Follow On." 
There is always a grave danger in mass distri- 
bution of literature that it be lightly esteemed and 
its use neglected. Placing the Fomvard Movement 
literature at the back of the Church and asking the 
congregation to take it as they go out is almost as 
bad as placing it in the pews for people to sit on. 
One effective way of individualizing the pamphlets 
has been found to be to have a lay visitation of the 
parish, thus distributing the booklets personally. 



A lay reader in charge of a congregation has 
had the name of each person written on the pamph- 
let and then given to him. Whatever method of 
personal distribution is followed the value of the 
gift will be increased if the distributor gives some- 
thing of himself with the little book. 



LETTER FROM NATIONAL COUNCIL 



June 11th, 1935. 
The Reverend W. R. Noe, 
507 Southern Building, 
Wilmington, North Carolina. 
My Dear Mr. Noe: 

A real missionary spirit has been shown by the 
Annual Convention of the Diocese of East Carolina 
in remitting their offering as a Special, designated 
for the work of Dr. Lulu Disosway, Shanghai and 
Miss Venetia Cox, Hankow. In this day when every- 
one is straining to meet Quotas and Expectations a 
Special of this kind is doubly appreciated. 
Sincerely yours, 

THE NATIONAL COUNCIL 

J. E. WHITNEY, Assistant Treasurer 



MEMORIAL SERVICE AT GOOD SHEPHERD, 
WILMINGTON. 



At a special memorial service held in the Church 
of the Good Shepherd, Wilmington, on the evening 
of Trinity Sunday, Bishop Darst dedicated a memo- 
rial cross to the Rev. John E. Huhn, who went from 
this parish as a missionary to Alaska, after graduat- 
ing from Virginia Seminary in 1902, and who died 
there in the year 1905. The cross is of native Alaskan 
wood, about eighteen inches in height, and was super- 
imposed upon a larger cross which marked the rest- 
ing place of the Rev. Mr. Huhn, and which was erect- 
ed by the Indians and Eskimos to whom Mr. Huhn 
ministered. Some time ago the larger cross was re- 
placed by a stone marker and the small cross sent to 
Mr. Huhn's sister who is a member of the Good Shep- 
herd parish. 

The Bishop, who was a class-mate of John E. Huhn 
in Seminary, made the memorial address telling of the 
friendship of the two in Seminary, the answer of Mr. 
Huhn to Bishop Rowe's call for missionaries for Al- 
aska, of Mr. Huhn's winning the title "the Flying 
Parson" because of his ability to travel from place 
to place so quickly by dog sled, and of the "call to a 
life of service in the larger life with God." 

The memorial cross is now placed on the chancel 
wall near the Bishop's chair and is marked by an in- 
scribed brass plate. Missionary hymns were used 
in the service and for the recessional, "The Strife is 
O'er." 



THE MISSION HERALD 



The Mission Herald 

ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 
Published Monthly except July and August at 

507 Southern Building 
WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 
Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor 

REV. WALTER R. NOE 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 

RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 

MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 
Advertising rates furnished on application. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to receive 
their papers, should promptly notify the Business Man- 
ager, giving when necessary, both the old and new ad- 
dress. 



CHURCH KALENDAR— JULY-AUGUST, 1935 



July 
July 7 — '3rd Sunday after Trinity- 
July 14 — 4th Sunday after Trinity- 
July 21 — 5th Sunday after Trinity- 
July 28— 6th Sunday after Trinity- 
August 
Aug. 4 — 7th Sunday after Trinity- 
Aug. 11 — 8th Sunday after Trinity- 
Aug. 18— 9th Sunday after Trinity- 
Aug. 25— 10th Sunday after Trinity- 



-Color (Green) 

-Color (Green) 

-Color (Green) 

-'Color (Green) 

-Color (Green) 
-Color (Green) 
-Color (Green) 
-Color (Green) 



FIRST SIX MONTHS 



The first six months of our present fiscal year will 
end with June and the parishes and missions are 
making a special effort to send in to tlie Treasurer 
of the Diocese by that time at least one-half of the 
amount reported for' the year for Diocesan and 
General Church purposes. A large number of them 
have already remitted for the first six months and 
we are reasonably sure that the other parishes and 
missions will be heard from with substantial remit- 
tances by the first week in July. 

In practically all parishes and missions, we have 
treasurers who are deeply interested in the whole 
work of the Church. They want to make re»;ular re- 
mittances for the missionary work of the Church, at 
home and abroad. They take a great deal of inter- 
est in our monthly financial reports and would like 
to see their parishes and missions paid up. You can 



help them by making it possible for them to catch 
up in their payments for the first half of the year. 
A full payment of your pledge to date for both the 
parish and the outside work will enable your treasu- 
rer to meet some pressing local obligations and to 
send a check to the Diocese for the amount now due. 



THE LAYMAN'S LEAGUE 



At the meeting of the Annual Convention, a com- 
mittee to consider the advisability of establishing 
a Branch of the Layman's League in the Diocese 
of Bast Carolina was appointed as follows : 

Mr. W. A. Townes, Wilmington; Mr. George H. 
Roberts, New Bern; and Mr. John Huske, Fayette- 
ville. 



CANON 30 



At the meeting of the Annual Convention, a new 
Canon, Number 30, was adopted as follows: 

''The Duties of a Rector or Minister-in.-ch.arge. 

Section 1. It shall be the duty of the Rector or 
Minister of every parish or congregation, learning 
of the removal of a communicant of his parish or 
congregation to another Cure, without having se- 
cured a letter of transfer as provided for by General 
Church Canon. Number 44, Section 1, paragraph 1, 
with consent of said communicant to transfer him 
or her to the Cure to which he or she has removed. 

Section 2, paragraph 1. It shall be the duty of the 
Rector or Minister-in-charge of a parish or congre- 
gation to submit to the Bishop for his examination 
at the time of his Annual Visitation the Parish 
Register that he may determine that all entries are 
properly made; all members accounted for and that 
the Register is properly indexed. 



MEETING OF CONVOCATION OF COLORED 
CHURCH WORKERS 



The Annual Meeting of the Convocation of Colored 
Church workers will be held in St. Ann's Church, 
Roper on the second Sunday in July. The Dean of 
the Convocation is the Rev. R. I. Johnson of New 
Bern. 



NEW BOARD OF EXAMINING CHAPLAINS 



At the recent meeting of the Annual Convention. 
Examining Chaplains were elected for three years 
as follows: Rev. Alexander Miller, Wilmington; 
Rev. E. W. Halleck, Wilmington; Rev. Worth Wick- 
er, Greenville ; Rev. E. T. Jillson, Hertford and Rev. 
C A. Ashbv, Edenton. 



JUNE- JULY, 1935 



THE BISHOP'S PENCE 



The Bishop of Chicago has just announced that 
the Bishop's Bence cans had brought into the Diocese 
during the year and a half of its operation, $42,000. 
The Diccese of Chicago was the pioneer in this easy 
plan to help the individual Barishes and the Diocese 
at the same time. Being the pioneer in our Diocese 
of East Carolina in this movement, I call upon my 
own Parishioners and all members of the Church in 
the Diocese to adopt this plan and to use it faithfully. 
It will bring you much joy and will help to provide 
funds where funds are lacking. A penny three times 
a day with the blessing. The penny can come from 
each member of the family, or it can come from the 
family as a whole; if that is too much of a burden 
on the family it can be a penny a day. Do one of the 
three, but do it, and do it systematically. 

STEPHEN GARDNER 



CAMP LEACH 



After careful consideration, and upon the advice of 
the State Board of Health, the Camp Leach Com- 
mittee on June 14th called off the Senior Camp, the 
Junior Camp for Boys, the Junior Camp for Girls, 
and the Midget Camp. Efforts were made up to the 
last minute to ai'range to carry on these camps later 
on in the summer. But after weighing over the mat- 
ter the Committee decided that it was best for ad 
concerned to definitely call off the Camps for this 
season. Word has been sent to all the clergy and 
all fees sent in have been returned to the senders. 

If arrangements can be made, and if it is practica- 
ble, the Committee hopes to have the Senior Camp 
in connection with the Young People's Convention 
at the camp before the schools open in September. 
STEPHEN GARDNER. 

CAMP RALLY 



Due to the postponement of the Episcopal camps at 
Camp Leach, the members of St. John's Service Lea- 
gue enjoyed a camp rally, Sunday night, June 16. A 
typical Camp Leach campfire, with the chairs ar- 
ranged in a circle and a simulated fire in the middle 
brough back happy memories of camp. William Jor- 
dan took the part of the director, George S. Gresham. 
The group sang the familiar camp songs with as much 
pep as is shown in camp. George Ed Warren cleverly 
filled the part of Jim Beckwith telling the camp story. 
Following the story, Elizabeth King and Phil Haigh 
struggled to get a piece of candy by chewing up 
string which was tied to the candy. Belle Ray Til- 
linghast read "Ye Prevaricating Search Light," the 
camp paper. The paper was written as if it were at 
the close of the first day of camp. Hating to stop 



the fun, the leaguers decided to sing more songs. 
Such songs as : "Dunderbeck," Lil' Liza Jane,", 
"Ho, Camp Leach," "Drink a Toast to Dear Old 
Tom," "Lizzie," and others were sung and enjoyed. 
The campfire was brought to a close by the singing 
humming and whistling of "Taps", followed by the 
usual "good-night." 

The Senior Camp was scheduled to open Monday, 
June 17, but the epidemic of infantile paralysis pre- 
vented this. However, all campers hope for a camp 
in the late summer. BELLE RAY TILLINGHAST. 



REV. A. J. MACKIE ACCEPTS CALL 



The Rev. A. J. Mackie, rector of St. Thomas', 
Windsor, and Grace Church, Woodville, and minis- 
ter-in-charge of Holy Innocents', Avoca and St. 
Mark's, Roxobel, has accepted a call to St. James', 
Belhaven ; St. George's, Lake Landing; Calvary, 
Swan Quarter; All Saints', Fairfied; St. John's, 
Sladesville: and St. Matthew's, Yeatesville. 

Mr. Mackie has served the AVindsor field for 
about ten years and has rendered faithful service 
to all the people. Members of all the religious 
bodies of these communities have learned to love 
him and have been helped by his services. 

Mr. Mackie and his family will move to Belhaven 
the first of July. 



WUHAN UNIVERSITY— WUCHANG, HUPEH, 
CHINA 



April, 1935 
Dear Miss Cox, 

Do you not believe, as I do, in paying honor where 
honor is due? This note is sent to pay honor to 
your excellent training of the choir and to express 
my heartiest appreciation of their performance yes- 
terday. 

Especially praisworthy, I felt, were Bach's 
"Jesus, Joy of Man's Desiring" (not forgetting 
the fluent rendering of the rippling accompaniment). 
Mendelssohn's "Lift Thine Eyes", and surely the 
most beautiful of all, Tchaikovsky's "Legend". 1 
would have given much to hear these three repeated. 
I am always impressed with the purity of their 
English pronunciation and their amazing memories. 

You do great credit to North Carolina ! More 
power to you and to the girls of St. Cecilia's Choir 
whose finished performance so richly entitle them 
to that honored name. 

Yours sincerely, 

MAGNUS IRVINE 

(This is a letter which an English Professor of 
our Government University wrote Miss Venetia Gov 
after a concert given by her Choir. He is very 
musical, plays the Biano beautifully) 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD 



LETTER FROM MRS. JOSEPHINE MARSHALL 



St. Paul's University Athletic Association 

April 27, 1935 
My Dear Mrs. Outland : 

In the mail from America this morning I received 
the very nice bulletin of the Woman's Auxiliary of 
the Diocese of East Carolina. I want to thank you 
very much for sending these copies to me. I appre- 
ciate it so much and enjoy reading the material and 
reports more than I can express, 

I have been intending to write to you for some time 
to show my appreciation of the "contacts" the 
Woman's Auxiliary has made and has kept with my 
husband and I during our term in Japan. We are 
very grateful and it is most cheering to us to feel 
this love and support from our home section. Let me 
assure you that in these very trying days we mis- 
sionaries are in real need of the affection and sympa- 
thy and help of our many friends at homo. 

Only a few weeks ago a very distressing article 
reached us, in which one of our own North Carolina 
churchmen advocated a further slash in salaries for 
the missionaries and accused us of "living like 
kings." As a reply to this charge, I would like to 
present our particular case to you and to the Aux- 
iliary at large in my own diocese. I do not mean 
this as any unchristianlike criticism of the gentle- 
man at home who made these remarks. However I 
do think you who have our interests at heart would 
be truly interested in our case, as an example of the 
missionary situation just now. 

When we first came to Japan, almost five years 
ago, we came with a married couple's salary of 
$2,325.00. Part of that was a special bonus due to 
the fact that Tokio is recognized as being the second 
most expensive city in the world in which to reside. 
Today our salary is $1,275, a drastic reduction of 
more than one thousand dollars yearly. 

Many people who come as visitors to the Orient 
accuse us of lives of ease in that labor is cheap; we 
usually have servants. However, the charge that we 
have five and six servants is nothing but a fable. 
Generally missionaries have but one general helper 
who is not classed as a "luxury" but more truly as 
a "necessity" when yon consider the great language 
difficulty with which we are faced. Although we 
study the Japanese language we find that it takes 
more than, a year or two to master it. Therefore a 
Japanese in the house is needed more than half a 
dozen times a day, for the language alone, to receive 
and discuss bills, to drive away beggars, and to or- 
der from the tradespeople. So a servant in the house 
is truly not unnecessary to your missionaries an 1 
that servant is possible only because wages for do- 
mestic help are liw. 



However, living is very high. I think it might be 
interesting to quote some prices to you of household 
necessities so that you may know how mitch extra 
we have to pay for things which you buy at home 
for average prices. In giving these prices, let me 
add that one American dollar makes three yen and 
one American cent three sen. So with this, it will 
be very easy for you to compare prices and see what 
we have to pay with our hundred dollars monthly. 

Cream of Wheat, (ten cent size — normal exchange 
30 sen), we pay Yen 1.00. (over three times as much). 

Black Shoe Poilsh, (five eent size — fifteen sen), 
we pay Yen 1.00. (seven times as much.) 

Broom, (twenty cents — should be 60 sen), we 
pay Yen 1.45 (almost three times as much.) 

Ivory Soap, (five cent cake — 15 sen), we pay 
Yen .90, (six times as much.) 

Soda Biscuits, (medium size box), we pay Yen 2.25. 

Cheese, (one half pound), we pay, Yen .85. 

Ketchup, (one small bottle). Yen 1.00. 

Sal a d Oil, (one medium bottle), Yen 2.25. 

Can Soup, (five cent size — 15 sen), Yen .90, (six 
times as much.) 

Steak, (two small pieces only), we pay, Yen 1.00 

Eggs, (one dozen), we pay Yen .60. 

Can Corn, Peas, Beans, etc, (five cent size — 15 sen) 
we pay, Yen .90. 

Ipana Toothpaste, (fifty cent size — 1.50). we pay, 
Yen 4.50. 

Klim for the baby, (one medium can), we pay, 
Yen 9.40. 

Palmolive Soap, (five cent size — 15 sen), we pay, 
Yen .45. 

Roast Beef, (small, for two people), we pay, Yen 
2.50. 

Squibb 's Codliver Oil, (medium bottle), we pay, 
Yen 3.85. 

These are only a very few articles but I believe 
that they will serve to show the excess we pay for 
the very essentials. One tourist very aptly put it 
when he said that only the luxuries were cheap in 
Japan. Unfortunately the missionaries have little 
interest or time for these things. But we are faced 
with maintaining an existence so that we may carry 
en Cods great work throughout the world. You can 
readily see from the few prices I listed the terriffic 
demands made upon our present salary and the im- 
possibility of "making both ends meet" with any 
less. 

In addition to the yearly salary reduction of over 
one thousand dollars, we have lost many other small 
allowances. Formerly our doctor and dental bills 
were paid. Now we pay twenty percent, and full 
charge for medicines. X-rays, etc. Formerly, too 
we were given several hundred dollars for summer 
vacations, to enable us to escape from the terifne 



JUNE- JULY, 1935 



11 



heat of our locality. This money we could either 
apply in travel or towards house rent at some beach 
or mountain resort. You have no idea how impor- 
tant this was to us all from a health standpoint. 
Oriental summers are very exhausting. Unfortu- 
nately this allowance too has been cut from us. Tin's 
present summer, with our one year old son to con- 
sider, we are face to face with the problem of what 
to do. If we undertake any trip, which would be 
both delightful and decidedly beneficial, we will be 
financially crippled. If we remain, we shall suffer 
in health. 

These are the worries of your missionaries, and for 
these burdens we ask your prayers and your help. 
I send these points to you and all the members of the 
Auxiliary because you are our friends at home and 
because we are your messengers abroad. You are 
our people and we belong to you. We are not 
"living like kings" as you can see. Many times we 
are in actual need. Many times we have to do 
without many things. But we have a very import- 
ant piece of missionary work to do here in Japan 
and we are determined to do it. Therefore we need 
your cheer and love, and help (whether it be spirit- 
ual or financial. Would it not be carrying on God's 
work for those at home who are blessed with plenty 
to pause and lend a hand from time to time in the 
field? If there are any who can do so, I hope they 
will remember, not only your four missionaries from 
East Carolina who look to you for help, but all peo- 
ple engaged in spreading God's word and love in the 
world. 

Thank you so much for all your kindness to us. I 
hope that we may always keep in such close touch. 
I deeply appreciate the many cards and greetings I 
receive frcm time to time. It' at any time I can help 
you. give you information, or send things to you, do 
please let me know. 

Most sincerely,' 
JOSEPHINE MARSHALL. 



LETTER FROM DR. DISOSWAY 



St. Elizabeth's Hospital, Shanghai, 
May 25, 1935 
Dear Mrs. Outland : 

It serms but yesterday that I was writing to you 
from New Bern. And here I sit in Nanking. China, 
and send a message of thanks to you. Probably you 
are surprised to hear from me here instead of from 
Shanghai. The explantation is simply that I am here 
on a week's vacation. I am having a delayed vaca- 
tion and putting myself in trim for the hot summer 
months. 

Speaking of hot summer months brings me back to 
your gift. We are so Grateful for it. I am sure the 



Women of East Carolina will be very happy when 
they know how much good that money is going to do. 
I want them to picture the hottest day we ever have 
in East Carolina, picture a day when the perspiration 
pours from face and arms and runs in little rivulets 
down the legs and back. Now to this add the stick- 
iness and intense humidity found only in Shanghai 
and along the Yangtze Valley. You will have an 
atmosphere in Avhieh we work during the summer. 
With this intense and sticky, drippy heat we go into 
the Operating Room, Delivery Rooms, and on our 
Wards. It is a terrible condition in which to work, 
especially in the Operating and Delivery Rooms. We 
wear as little as possible. We put on our sterile 
gowns, and we come out drenched. With your four 
hundred dollars we are changing the situation We 
are air-conditioning our Operating Room and our De- 
livery Room. You will never know how grateful we 
are to you. Those places will be at least half comfor- 
table to work in. When this letter reaches you we 
hope already to be using the apparatus. No money 
I am sure has been put to use so quickly. You can 
picture us in the hottest days of July and August — 
and oh how hot Shanghai is — operating with a little 
comfort. Your four hundred dollars will give us that 
great necessity that we have so long gone without. 
Please thank each and every Auxiliary for us. I am 
expressing the thanks of the entire staff. Dr. Puller- 
ton asked me to write a personal letter because I 
know you all. Please accept our great thanks. 

I can hardly realize that I'll be home with you next 
year. Four years have rolled away so quickly. I am 
due on furlough in July, 1936. I hope to see all of 
you at that time. 

Yes, I remember the amber beads. I still have 
them and the same dress. I love it because I have so 
many pleasant associations with it. 

How about the young girl who was interested in 
Mission work? We need her youth and great spirit 
and enthusiasm. I have often thought of her. 

I shall return to Shanghai tomorrow. Have had a 
very good rest and am fit for the hot summer. It is 
such a pleasure to know the heat of the Operating 
Room will be softened and lessened by your cooling 
svstem. 

Do write when you can. I hope you can read my 

terribe fist! When my own dream comes true I'll 

have a typewriter for my work, (personal letters. 

etc.), then others can read easily. It is still a dream. 

Sincerely, 

LULA DISOSWAY 

(You will all remember that our 1934 Advance 
Work was $400.00 for St. Elizabeth's Hospital, 
Shanghai. I know we are all very happy that our 
e-ift has added to the comfort and efficiency of our 
representatives on the "Front Line." — A. R. O.) 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD 



LETTER FROM PRESIDENT OF WOMAN'S 
AUXILIARY 



MEETING OF DICTRICT 12, WOMAN'S 
AUXILIARY 



June 12, 1935. 
Dear Co- Workers : 

The State Health Department has advised the 
postponement of all Camps in the Eastern part of our 
state on account of the eases of Infantile Paralysis. 
This of course affects Camp Leach, and means that 
the Senior Camp will not be held this month. On ac- 
count of this we will not have Auxiliary Day at Camp 
this summer. I am very sorry that we will not have 
an opportunity to meet together as we have for the 
past three years; but my deepest regret is that such a 
distressing illness has come to some of our communi- 
ties. Let us all unite our prayers that it may not 
spread, and that those children who have been strick- 
en may recover. 

Your 'Convocational President has written yo_u 
about the Summer Work, but I should like to add 
one word to further emphasize its importance. Our 
Bishop has asked us to raise a Fund for our Summer 
Work, to help with the education of two young men 
who are anxious to enter the ministry. Surely there 
is no work with a greater appeal than this, so try to 
make it a worthy Fund. These young men are ready 
to give their whole lives to the Master, so let us give 
generously of our means to help prepare them, that 
we too may share in their work. 

Please try to meet through the summer months; 
remembering especially the Bureau of Supplies, and 
bring some article each month for that splendid work. 
The Forward Movement Commission has prepared 
for our use during the summer a copy of "The Acts" 
with very helpful suggestions for its study — that we, 
like the Earl\ Disciples, through our Acts and joy- 
ful companionship with the Living Christ, may more 
fully realize the meaning of our Discipleship today. 
These little booklets entitled "Follow On" cost 02 
each, and may be gotten, in any quantity from the 
Forward Movement Commission, 223 West Seventh 
St.. Cincinnati, Ohio. Please write for copies and use 
them as suesested. For then and then only, can we 
go FORWARD as we should. 

With my love and deepest interest in all of your 
work, and with the sincere hope that this may bo a 
blessed season of growth and re-creation, I am 
Faithfully yours, 

ANNA ROSE OUTLAND. 



The annual meeting of the Woman's Auxiliary of 
District 12 met in Wilmington, N. C, at St. John's 
Church on Wednesday, May 22, 1935. 

The chief speakers of the occasion were Mrs. .1. 
Q. Beckwith, President of the Convocation, and Mrs. 
Fred Outlancl, Diocesan President, and Mrs. Henry 
J. MacMillan, Provincial President. 

The meeting was well attended and great interest 
was shown in the many interesting subjects dis- 
cussed. A rising vote of thanks was extended to 
Mrs. Walter Williamson, retiring president, and Mrs. 
William James was elected to fill this vacancy. 
MRS. M. G. SAUNDERS. 



DISTRICT MEETING HELD IN GREENVILLE 



The get-together meeting of the Third District 
was entertained by the two Auxiliaries of St. Paul's 
parish, Greenville, on May 8th. Representative 
groups of women from Ayden, Farmville, Grifton, 
Greenville and Winterville were present. 

At ten o'clock the Holy Communion was celebrated 
by the rector, Rev. Worth Wicker. 

Following this service the meeting was called to 
order by the district president, Mrs. G. S. Vought of 
Farmville. Mrs. Eleanor Gower of Grifton, gracious- 
ly responded to the cordial welcome' extended the vis- 
itors by Mrs. Richard Williams. 

After the routine of business was completed a very 
interesting program was presented. Mr. Wicker 
spoke on the purpose of the "Forward Movement" in 
our national church. Miss Hennie Long read an in- 
teresting paper, the history of the local parish. Miss 
Bessie Brown accompanied by Miss Eva Hodges saiv? 
two solos. Mrs. Joyner of Farmville discussed in an 
interesting way two women of the Bible, Mary and 
Martha. A playlet given by the college girls of the 
Friendly Hall group coached by Mrs. Worth Wicker 
was very effective. The playlet was written by Mrs. 
W. S. Carawan. President of the Convocation of 
Edenton. 

Noon-day prayers were said by Rev. Mr. Klomrm 
of Farmville. After the benediction was pronounced 
by Rev. Alex Noe of Ayden the group adjourned to 
the parish house, where a delicious luncheon was 
r^rved and a happy social hour was enjoyed. After 
this "ood-byes were said with the reminder that next 
year the group would eniov another happy get-to- 
rether experience at Grifton. 



JUNE- JULY, 1935 



13 



NOTES FROM FRIENDLY HALL 
Greenville, N. C. 



Although Easter came so late this year that there 
was an unusually short interval between our spring 
vacation and the College commencement, this last 
month was a most active one at Friendly Hall. 

First came our Auxiliary meeting to which we had 
all looked forward with the keenest interest because 
our rector was to answer the many questions which 
had been collecting in our Question Box for the past 
<hrec months. And we were not dissappointed, for 
Mr Wicker in answering our questions so clearly, set- 
tled us on many points about the Church which we 
had been debating in our minds for a long time. 

On one of our Saturday afternoons we had a most 
delightful surprise, provided by Misses Estelle 
Greene, Hennie Long and Bessie Brown. Our group 
gathered as usual at Friendly Hall, expecting to have 
our supper there, but instead they took us out to Miss 
Brown's farm where we had the loveliest picnic. It 
just seemed grand to be able to go out on a picnic 
after the long winter months! We loved the "feel' 
of spring, and to see all Miss Brown's little plants 
growing made us realize that it was really here again. 
Nothing was lacking on this occasion, and as for the 
food that dissappeared, it is enough to say that a 
group of college girls were satisfied, and happily so. 

Our branch of the Auxiliary was much pleased that 
we were asked to take part in the program of the 
district meeting <of the Woman's Auxiliary which 
was held in Greenville on the 8th. We enjoyed giv- 
ing the little play, which came just before the lovely 
luncheon to which we Avere all invited. At the meet- 
ing our secretary, Vivian Carolus, made an informal 
report on the Student Work for the year 

Our last Saturday evening at Friendly Hall was 
turned into a surprise party for Minnie Ross, who is 
to be married in July. We played bridge and other 
games and then went into the parish banquet hall 
where the supper table looked quite festive with its 
decorations of yellow and white flowers and yellow 
tapers. One of the features of the supper was the 
cutting of the bride's cake, with the fortunes it was 
to tell with the ring, coin, needle, etc. After supper 
Mrs. Wicker sang several lovely songs appropriate to 
the occasion. We all had a grand time, and our pros- 
pective bride seemed delighted with the gift — a pair 
of embroidered pillow cases — from the Friendly Hill 
group. 

As the culmination of the year our annual Cor- 
porate Communion at 7 :30 on the morning of June 
2nd. The Reverend Oliver J. Hart, of Washington, 
D. C, who was to preach the baccalaureate sermon 



at the College at eleven o'clock, assisted our rector 
in the Celebration, and Friendly Hall was honored 
by having a visit from him afterwards. We were de- 
lighted to have with us at this service two of last 
year's graduates. Allene Hunt and Florence Eagles, 
who were back for Commencement. Miss Estelle 
Greene, who has done so much for our pleasm*e 
throughout the year, had planned a most delicious 
breakfast, so we lingered at Friendly Hall, enjoying 
it and chatting. Among other things we discussed 
an article which recently appeared in the Southern 
Churchman setting forth the needs of the Church of 
the Resurrection at Kyoto, Japan, and we decided to 
send the Reverend J. Kenneth Morris five dollars to- 
wards some "cubic feet" of concrete in the proposed 
new church building. Mr. Morris is the brother of 
our Mrs. Jennie Morris Howard, who was in charge of 
Friendly Hall for a number of years. 

At this time Mrs. Wicker presented to each one of 
us a little book, "The Practice of Religion" which 
will mean a great deal to us in our devotional lives 
and ever remind us of the splendid instruction she 
has given us on the history and doctrine of the 
Church. 

We bade "good-bye" to Friendly Hall with a feel- 
ing of gratitude for the year and with some of us 
looking forward to the fall which holds much of the 
promise of even better things. 

MARY TARRY, 

Chairman of Publicity. 



(Continued from Page 2) 
Vanceboro; St. Philip's, Campbellton (Fayetteville) ; 
St. Augustine's, Kinston ; St. Peter's, Sunbury; and 
St. Thomas', Jasper. With financial conditions as 
they are, it would be a most disastrous thing if we 
■should lose any of these buildings. The Committee 
recommends that this matter be referred to the Com- 
mitte on Insurance. 

During the past year Our Bishop confirmed 323 
persons. He ordained 3 Deacons, and advanced 2 
Deacons to the Priesthood, 6 Clergymen were trans- 
ferred to other Dioceses, and three were received 
by Ordination. 

One Clergyman, The Rev. I. d'L. Brayshaw, we 
lost by death. Thus, the rank of the clergy was re- 
duced four in number. 

Respectfully submitted. 

(Rev.) Worth Wicker, 
(Rev.) W. R, Noe, 
(Rev.) George S. Gresham, 
(Mr.) W. B. Campbell, 
(Mr.) John R. Tolar. 
Committee on the State of the Church. 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD 



REPORT OF THE WOMAN'S AUXILIARY TO 
THE ANNUAL CONVENTION 



Right Reverend Father in God, and 
Members of the Diocesan Convention : 

I bring you the report of the work of the Woman's 
Auxiliary with renewed hope and a deep conviction 
that the women of East Carolina are beginning a new 
.step in the fulfillment of the purpose of God in their 
lives and work. 

The Annual Meeting was held in January, in St. 
Stephen's Church, Goldsboro, and was well attended. 
Dr. Vincent C. Franks, of old St. Paul's Church, Nor- 
folk, addressed our Mass Meeting and brought us 
a message that will be long remembered. Our Bish- 
op could be with us only one day as he had to leave 
to take part in the Consecration of Bishop Gribbin. 
The keynote of our meeting was service, and we had 
with us for two days Miss Grace Lindley — one whose 
life has been such an example of Service that all 
who were there went back to their parishes with a 
new vision of its meaning, and a new determination 
to Serve. 

Again during Lent our Parish groups shared in I he 
World Day of Prayer; and on Good Friday made 
their offerings for the Jerusalem and East Mission 
Groups throughout the Diocese met each week dur- 
ing Lent for Study Classes, thus increasing their 
knowledge and interest in the Whole Program of the 
Whole Church. 

In the spring, Get-Together Meetings were held 
in each of the twelve Districts in the Diocese, with 
interesting and instructive programs. The Depart- 
ment Chairmen were all active during the year and 
kept ever before the Parish Groups the necessity for 
work in each Department, reaching each of the Five 
Fields of Service. The work of the Church Period- 
ical Club has gone steadily forward and has reached 
many hungry hearts with good reading material. 

The Convocational Presidents have kept in close 
touch with the smaller groups and they had two 
splendid meetings in the Fall with full programs and 
record attendance. The Secretary and Treasurer 
have again been my loyal and interested co-workers, 
strengthening me in all that I had to do. The Sec- 
retary prepared and published our Annual, which 
has received commendation from all over the prov- 
ince. 

To better understand the scope of our work it is 
necessary to group it under the Five Fields of Ser- 
vice, and report its value in money; thou°:h I be* 1 
you all to think of it not in tei-ms of dollars and 
cents, but as loyal, loving service 011 the part of many 



consecrated women. The financial report is as fol- 

ows : 

Parish $ 4,479.83 

Community 1,195.43 

Diocese 3,292.08 

Nation 209.79 

World 464.94 

Supply Work 3,892.85 

United Thank Offering 3,432.29 

Total $16,967.21 

There is an increase over last year's gifts, not a 
large one, but enough to show that we are moving in 
the right direction. 

That knowledge of, and interest in, the United 
Thank Offering is constantly increasing is demon- 
strated by the report that East Carolina, both white 
and colored branches, were among the seventeen 
Diocesan Groups whose offerings were larger in the 
past triennium, than the preceeding one. 

The Colored Convocation does a splendid work 
under the leadership of their very efficient President. 
They present a report each year at our Annual Meet- 
ing. 

For our summer work our Bishop gave us a Spir- 
itual Endeavor instead of a Financial Effort, and I 
feel that it did much to quicken the life of the Aux- 
iliary. We had as the theme of our study "the Mes- 
sage" of our Presiding Bishop, and we gained from 
this a broader knowledge of the Purpose of God in 
our lives and work. 

The women of the Diocese met again for Aux- 
iliary Day at Camp Leach during the Senior Camp- 
giving us an opportunity to come together informal- 
ly, and to come into closer touch with the work of 
the Young People— our Church of Tomorrow. 

In the early Fall it was my privilege to attend a 
Clergy Conference at Camp Leach and share in the 
plans for the Every Member Canvass. The women 
of the Diocese helped in this great work ; again 
taking their places as true auxiliaries in the Wholo 
Program of the Church. 

At the Triennial Meeting of the Woman's Aux- 
iliary in Atlantic City, East Carolina had its full 
representation of five delegates, who were faithful 
and regular in their attendance at each session dur- 
ing the whole meeting. From this great gathering, 
with its theme of Discipleship, a new interest was 
brought home to our work, and a new vision of our 
intimate share and responsibility in each phase of our 
Church's program. During the Triennial Meeting 
we attended the Provincial Dinner and here had the 
privilege of hearing a message from our new Provin- 



JUNE- JULY, 1935 



1." 



cial Auxiliary President, Mrs. Henry J. MacMillan 
of Wilmington. 

Following the General Convention and Triennial 
Meeting we had in our Diocese four conferences led 
by one of the Field Teams sent out by that Depart- 
ment of our National Council. Mrs. John R. Wheel- 
er of Nashville, Tenn., addressed groups of women 
representing every District and nearly every Parish 
and Mission in the Diocese. These meetings brought 
to us the inspiration of the Triennial, and as they 
ended in a general discussion period, they gave us 
an opportunity to learn of methods and means em- 
ployed by women in other parts of the Church. 
They did much to quicken our Missionary interest. 

The observance of Armistice Day as a Quiet Day 
for Prayer was again joined in by Auxiliary women 
all over the world. It is to be hoped that these pray- 
ers for Universal Peace and understanding will ever 
ascend as "the smoke of the incense which came 
from the prayers of the saints", and that as all wom- 



en rise from their knees they may turn to thoughts 
and activities that will destroy all possibility of fu- 
ture misunderstandings and international antagon- 
isms. 

This, briefly, is an outline of the work of the great 
Force that is known as the Woman's Auxiliary in 
East Carolina. There have been difficulties to over- 
come and occasional discouragements — but over and 
above them all we have had the loving leadership of 
our Bishop, whose unselfish Service during the past 
twenty years has led us ever on. We follow with 
grateful hearts that we as Auxiliary Members, may 
share in the work he plans for us. By the help of 
the Holy Spirit may we each one become a true Dis- 
ciple, using our stumbling blocks for stepping stones 
as we press forward to share in the fulfillment of 
God's purpose in our lives, and in the building of his 
Kingdom on Earth. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ANNA ROSE OUTLAND. 



STATEMENT OP THE A3IOUNTS PAID BY THE PARISHES AND MISSIONS FOR DIOCESAN AND GENERAL 

CHURCH WORK, JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1935. 



Parishes 

Beaufort, St. Paul's 

Clinton, St. Paul's 

Fayetteville, St. John's 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 

Hope Mills, Christ Church.... 

Klnston, St. Mary's 

New Bern, Christ Church 

Red Springs, St. Stephen's 
S^ven Springs, Holy Innocents' 

Southport, St. Philip's 

Wilmington. Good Shepherd ... 

■Wilmington, St. James' 

Wilmington St. John's 

Wilmington, St. Paul's 



Organized Mlss'ons. 

Burgaw, St. Mary's 
Faison, St. Gabriel's . . 



Parishes 

Aurora, Holy Cross 

Ayden. St. James' 

Bath, St. Thomas' 

Belhaven, St. James' 

Bonnerton, St. John's 

Chocowinity. Trinity . 

Columhia, SI. Andrew's 

Creswell, St. David's 

Edenton, St. Paul's 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church 

Farmville, Emmanuel 

Gatesvilie, St. Mary's 

Greenville,. St. Paul's 

Grifton, St. John's 

Hamilton, St. Martin's 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 

Jessama, Zion 

lake landing. St. George's .. 
Plymouth, Grace Church 

Roper. St. Duke's 

Washington, St Peter's 

Williamston, Advent 



CONVOCATION OF WILMINGTON. 



Expec- 
tations 

365.20 

50.00 

2,150 00 

1 oon nn 

" 60.00 

1,000.01 

2.125.00 

55.00 

20n nn 

169.60 

371.40 

9 781.50 

2,031.60 

1,200.00 



Paid 
June 25 

$ 76. 

50 

602 

181 
30 

500. 

446 
38 
14 
81. 

204 
4,277 

860 

310. 



to 
111 

3 
00 
26 
01 
.00 
00 
,24 
00 
S7 
6S 
.53 
.67 
22 
06 



Eumberton, Trinity 

North West, All Soul's... 
Pikevi'le. St. George's ... 
Trenton, Grace Church . . . 

Vanceboro, St Paul s 

Whiteville, Grace Church . 
Wrightsville, St. Andrews 



Unorsanized Missions. 

Jasper, St. Thomas' 

Pollocksville, Mission 

Wilmington, Delgado Mission 



35.00 
65.00 



11.97 
34.44 



Paroehial Missions. 

rampbellton St. Philip's . . 
Tolar-Hart, Good Shepherd. 



Total 



CONVOCATION OF EDENTON 



250.00 
300.»0 

35.00 

350.00 

100.00 

100.00 

200.00 

300.00 

1,559 80 

1,008.76 

238.20 

128.00 

1.356 20 

200.00 

65.00 

4no no 

foo.oo 

200 00 

200.00 

75.00 

1,500.00 

100.00 



52.63 



29 83 

67.38 

41.50 

500.00 

557.79 

86.03 

117.03 

710.75 

8.10 

32.50 

116.67 

•37.50 

35.18 

97.61 

40.50 

565.58 

111.19 



Windsor, St Thomas' 

AVinton. St. John's 

Woodviile, Grace Church . 

Organized Missions 

Ahoskie St. Thomas' 

Fairfield, All Saints' 

Murfreesboro, St. Barnabas' 

Roxobel. St. Mark's 

Sladesville, St. John's ... 
Snow Hill. St. Barnabas' . 
Sunbury, St. Peter's ..... 
Swp n Quarter. Calvary ... 
Winterville, St. Luke's . . . 
Yeatesville, St. Matthew's 

Unorganized Mission*. 

A voca. Holy Innocents' 
Camden, St. Joseph's 



Total 



Parishes 

Vqyetteville. St Joseph's 
New Bern, St. Cyprian's . . 
Wilmington, St. Mark's . , 



CONVOCATION OF COLORED CHURCH WORKERS 



Organized Missions 

Belhaven. St. Mary's 

Edenton. St. .Tohn-Evanerelist 
Elizabeth City, St. PhiHp's .. 

Coldsboro. St. Andrew's 

Kington, St. Augustine's 
Washington, St. Paul's 



104.00 
420 on 
140.00 



105.00 

1 oi nn 

20.15 

60. nn 

75.00 

120.00 



175.00 


121.18 


19 nn 


37 22 


1.75 


8.74 


20 26 


23.36 



Expec- 


Paid to 


tations 


June 251 h 


174 00 


70.00 


10.00 


2.94 


20.00 




15.00 


11.50 


30.00 


6.07 


100.00 


50.00 


6.00 


5.75 


20.00 




20.00 




10.00 


5.00 


25.00 


8.37 


70.00 


53.68 


$ 21,159.30 


$ 7,932.56 


225.00 


94.17 


100 nn 


21.67 


150.00 


68.79 


55.00 




10.00 




30.00 


9.67 


■9'' OS 


55.55 


10.00 




100.00 




42.00 


20.17 


20.00 




125.00 


S5.00 


20.00 


20.00 


80.00 


10.00 


10.00 


5.00 


$ 9.S35.04 


$ 3,407 79 



Unoreanizcd Missions. 

Aurora, St. Jude's 

Beaufort, St. Clement's . 

rireenville, St. Andrew's . 

Haddock's Cross Roads, St. Stephen's 

Roper. St. Ann's 

Wilmington, "Brooklyn" Mission... 
Wrightsville, St. Augustine's 



Total 

Grand Total 



43.00 






3 00 


40 no 






14/30 


30.00 








30. on 






1.66 


26.00 








20.00 






10,00 


20.00 






10.00 


$ 1,354.15 


$ 




445.47 


$ 32,348.49 


$ 


1 1 


,875 S2 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD 



VIRGINIA EPISCOPAL 
SCHOOL 

LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 

Prepares boys for College and University. Splen- 
did environment and excellent corps of teachers. 
High standard in scholarship and athletics. Healthy 
and beautiful location in the mountains of Virginia. 
Charges exceptionally low. For catalog apply to: 

REV. OSCAR deWOLF RANDOLPH 

RECTOR 



McCONNELL & CAUSEY 

FOR SERVICE 

Good ~Year Tires Exide Batteries 

Quaker State Lubrication 

Telephone 827 12th and Market Sis. 

Wilmington, N. C. 



Form of Bequest 

I hereby, give, devise, and bequeath to 
the Trustees of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church in the Diocese of East Carolina 



to be held by them in trust for. 



I 
* 



* _.,_., 



.*. „ , — 



ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Conducted for Negro Youth under the auspices of the Epis- 
copal Church. 

A four year accredited College Course is offered, leading to 
degrees of B. A. and B. S., including Pre-Medical work and 
Teacher Training for State High School Teachers' certificates. 

A College Preparatory Department, Training School for Nurses 
and School for Religious and Social Workers are connected with 
the College. 

Thorough training, healthy environment. Christian influences. 
For Catalog and information -write — 

The Registrar 
ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE, RALEIGH, N. C. 



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rLUlXLIlL NOSE AND THROAT DROPS 35c 

MANUFACTURED BY 

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Washington, North Carolina 



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50c PER POUND 

WRITE US FOR SPECIAL CLUB 
RATES IN 50-LB. LOTS 

TOLAR, HART & HOLT MILLS 

FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



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108 Princess Street 
Wilmington, N. C. 



+ , — , — , ,,»_,„_„_ 

| SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 
JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

An Episcopal School for girls — Have your daughter 
receive her education in a church school. 

Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, B. S., 
Principal 

Saint Mary's offers 4 years' High School and 2 
years' College work all fully accredited by the South- 
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20-Acre Campus. Gym and Field Sports. Tennis. 
Indoor Tiled Swimming Pool. Horseback 
Riding. Golf 

A. W. TUCKER, Business Manager. 



»— "■— + 



fCt^.Cfc 



Jan. 3 6 

Library, U. N. C. 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 



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THE MISSION HERALD 



FORWARD mOUEItlENT 



OTHER CHURCHES USE FORWARD MANUAL 



Washington, D. C. — The literature of the Forward 
Movement is reaching out to others besidse the mem- 
bers of the Episcopal Church. Recently the Rev. 
Oliver J. Hart, rector of St. John's Church, received 
a letter from the pastor of "The First Church", Bel- 
fast, Me., asking for copies of the Forward Move- 
ment manual "Follow On". The minister wrote, "A 
parishioner of yours has given me a booklet and 
though I am not of your household of faith I like it 
so well that I wish to receive fifty copies for distri- 
bution to my own people." 



THE SHOT HEARD ROUND THE WORLD 



Cincinnati, Ohio. — Repercussions of the Forward 
Movement are being felt in our neighbor to the North. 
From Victoria, British Columbia, the following has 
been received at Forward Movement headquarters. : 

"Please advise whether it is possible for us to pro- 
cure a set of the booklets and leaflets issued to date 
since the inception of the Forward Movement. We 
are initiating similar action in this, the Diocese of 
Columbia, and therefore I am anxious to see how 
our Sister Communion is going about it, especially 
as you are getting results!" 



PARISH CLEARS DEBT. GAINS NEW VITALITY 



Pottsville, Pa. — As one resvdt of the new spirit en- 
gendered in Trinity Parish by the Forward Move- 
ment, a successful campaign to clear off the parish 
debt of $10,000 has been completed. The parish is 
preparing to extend its activity in the Forward Move- 
ment with a confident and revitalized membership. 
There was an attendance of about 600 at the Whit- 
sunday Communion. One layman, eager to see a full 
participation, sent telegrams to every man in the 
parish reminding them on Whitsun morning of the 
Church's corporate action. Laymen are taking re- 
newed interest. Recently a Mother-and-Daughter 
corporate Communion brought an attendance of 250 
women. 



TOO OLD TO EARN, STILL USEFUL FOR GOD 



Washington, D. C. — An old lady from the South, 
determined to do her share in personal evangelism, 
has asked for twenty-five or fifty Forward Movement 



Bible manuals to distriblte among her friends, most- 
ly by mail. She has also asked for copies of recent 
radio addresses given by Church leaders in the For- 
ward Movement. She says, "I am too old now to 
be able to earn a salary, but Cod still can make some 
use of this rather weak vessel." 



GROWING DEMAND FOR FORWARD MOVE- 
MENT LITERATURE 



Cincinnati, Ohio. — Fifty thousand additional 
copies of the autumn manual of Bible readings and 
meditations have been ordered from the printers by 
the Forward Movement Cimmission, as the initial 
run of 200,000 copies will soon be exhausted by 
orders pouring in from all parts of the country. To 
date there have been 1,120 orders, totalling 169,36-J 
copies. The Commission has promisel to fill all or 
ders received and the printing may go over a quarter 
of a million. 

Appeals sent to Cincinnati headquarters show a 
great demand for special literature for young peo- 
ple's activities and women's work. The Commission 
is working now on a young people's program, and 
efforts will be made to fill the demand for special lit- 
erature as soon as possible. 



A LAYMAN GIVES HIS POINT OF VIEW 



Houston, Texas. — A new field for the activity of 
laymen in stimulating parish life has been opened by 
the weekly bulletin of St. Stephen's Church here. In 
a recent issue the rector turned over a column, usual- 
ly reserved for a devotional message of his own, to a 
layman who declared himself so "stirred up" by the 
implications of the Forward Movement that he 
wished to tell about it from a layman's point of view. 
The message which followed attracted much atten- 
tion and won praise from Forward Movement head- 
quarters. 

The layman wrote of his own experience in "try- 
ing to evolve, through study and prayer, some plan 
wherby I might carry on with greater efficiency." 
His solution is in the conception of life as a strenuous 
challenging adventure in intimate relationship with 
Christ., "I have come to realize," he wrote, "that 
there is no virtue in church attendance, or prayer, or 
reading the Bible, unless we obtain personal con- 
tact with the Father, unless we come into intimate 
relationship with Jesus Christ Himself, and through 
Him with the Father." 



The Mission Herald 



VOLUME XLIX 



WILMINGTON, N., O, AUGUST-SEPTEMBER, 1935 



NUMBER 8-9 



BISHOP'S LETTER 



In writing this, my first Mission Herald letter 
since my return from England, I desire first of all, to 
thank my good friends in the diocese who made the 
trip possible and tell them how thoroughly I en- 
joyed my delightful vacation. 

As I have no report of official acts during the past 
two months, I will make this letter a bit more per- 
sonal than usual by giving a brief summary of my 
trip. 

I sailed from New York on the S. S. "Penland," 
of the Red Star Line, at midnight July 19th, and af- 
ter a most pleasant crossing reached Southampton on 
the 28th. The next few days were spent in London 
during which time I visited, or revisited, many inter- 
esting spots in that wonderful old city. While in 
London, I had the privilege of presenting a gavel to 
the ancient "Society for the Propagation of the Gos- 
pel," and this gift was most graciously accepted by 
Sir Edward Midwinter, Archivist of the S. P. G. 
The gavel was made from holly from Roanoke Island 
and bore the inscription, "Presented to the Society 
for the Propagation of the Gospel by the Roanoke 
Colony Memorial Association, in commemoration of 
the birth and baptism of Virginia Dare, first-born of 
English parents in North America. Fort Raleigh, 
Roanoke Island, North Carolina). August 18th and 
20th, 1587." 

Leaving London by motor, on July 31st, I enjoyed 
an all day trip by way of Oxford and the Cotswold 
country of Gloucester. From there I took several 
short trips to points of interest in that charming sec- 
tion, including the lovely Wye Valley, Chepston with 
its Norman castle built in 1100, the ruins of Tintern 
Abby, Monmouth and Ross. 

On Sunday, August 4th, I attended services in 
Gloucester Cathedral at 8 -.00 and 11 :00 and enjoyed 
worshipping in that stately and beautifbl House of 
God. The present building was begun by Abbot 
Serlo in 1089, but the first church was built in 681. 

Returning to London for a few days, I had the pri- 
vilege of attending a great service in St. Paul's Ca- 
thedral, at which Canon "Dick" Sheppard, one o£ 
the most popular clergymen in England, was the 
preacher. 

My next trip out of London was to Exeter, one of 
the old "Royal Cities" and, to me, one of the most 
fascinating spots in England. While in Exeter, I 
met with an old friend and former clergyman of East 



Carolina, the Rev. Reginald Mallett, and we had a 
delightful day together touring the lovely Devon and 
Cornwall country. I was in Exeter over Sunday and 
enjoyed the services in what, I consider, one of the 
most beautiful cathedrals in England. 

Returning to London, I had the privilege of seeing 
several old friends. Among the most pleasant inci- 
dents of that week, was my visit to a former Wil- 
mingtonian, Lady Donkin, who is a sister of our own 
Mrs. J. Victor Grainger of Wilmington. I also had 
the privilege of meeting that grand old founder of 
the Church Army, Prebendary Carlile, and of having 
lunch with the Staff at Church Army Headquarters. 
On Saturday, August 17th, I sailed for home on the 
S. S. " Westcrnland" and, after a most delightful 
trip, reached New York on August 26th. From there I 
went to Kanuga, and joined Mrs. Darst and our 
daughter, who had been spending the month in that 
pleasant place. 

After a little visit to friends and relatives in Vir- 
ginia, we came on to Wilmington, reaching here on 
the 12th. 

I am indeed happy to be home and am looking for- 
ward with joy to my fall and winter work. I am 
feeling rested and refreshed after my most helpful 
vacation, and it is with renewd vigor and enthusiasm 
that I take up my beloved work in East Carolina. 

I am truly sorry that I could not be with our 
young people during the Conference and Convention 
at Camp Leach, and am happy to know that the meet- 
ing was so helpful and fine. 

I hope and believe that we will have a real Forward 
Movement in our diocese this fall and winter, and I 
pledge my best to the glorious task as we go forward 
joyfully and courageously to the winning of new 
fields for Christ and His Church. May nothing stop 
us ; may no fears and doubts or selfish interests hold 
us back from the victory that belongs to those who 
travel on under the leadership of Jesus, the King. 
Faithfully and affectionately, 

Your friend and Bishop, 

THOMAS C. DARST. 



FIRST BAPTISM IN FORT BRAGG CHAPEL 



The first child baptized in the new Fort Bragg 
Chapel, was by the Rev. Howard Alligood, August 
21. 1935. Name, Sara Marie Webb, daughter of 1st 
Lieutenant and Mrs. Walter W. Webb. Sponsors: 
Mrs. Mr.rie Rios, Mrs. John Mesick and Dr. John W. 
Gamie. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



QENERAL CHURCH 



FORTY ADDITIONAL MEN 



WORK, PRAY, AND GIVE FOR HIS KINGDOM 



The missionary cause of the Church is languishing 
because of a lack of money. Appropriations have 
been reduced by more than forty per cent as com- 
pared with those a few years ago, and a deficit of 
$850,000 has been accumulated. Faithful and ex- 
perienced workers have been dismissed, the support 
of hospitals, schools and colleges reduced to a dan- 
gerous degree, and the preaching of the Gospel limit- 
ed by reductions in personnel and money for travel. 
In the domestic field we have given a man seven 
stations instead of four, and have then told him that 
he will have less money for gasoline and will have 
to make out with an old car in bad repair. In the 
foreign field we are able to send out but a few re- 
placements a year to fill vacancies caused by age, ill- 
ness, or death. There is real danger in some dis- 
tricts that in a few years we shall be left without 
trained and experinced leadership. 

The casual comment upon this situation is that it 
is not surprising in view of economic conditions. It 
is not surprising, but it is not necessary. The gifts 
of the members of the Episcopal Church in 1934 for 
the support of its missionary work under the Nation- 
al Council were at the rate of $1.15 per communicant, 
or about two cents a week. The devoted one-third 
which is all that can be rated as regular 'givers, have 
continued their support of the Church in the face of 
declining incomes ; the casual and sometime large giv- 
ers have usually faded out of the picture. While 
giving at the rate of two cents a week is utterly in- 
adequate to care for the great work our Church has 
undertaken, the greater tragedy lies in the large pro- 
portion of non-givers. This is evidence of the tragic 
indifference to Christian duty on the part of a major- 
ity of our people who take no part in the Church's 
chief work.. 

Our Church in its Office of Instruction states that 
it is the bounden duty of every Churchman "to fol- 
low Christ, to worship God every Sunday in H'S 
Church, and to work, pray, and give for the spread 
of His Kingdom." Here is the standard set for us 
and which we accept by our membership; a standard 
high indeed, but far less high than the pledge given 
over and over again as we make our communions, 
"here we offer and present unto thee, Lord, our- 
selves." 

LEWIS B. FRANKLIN, D. C. L, 
Vice-President and Treasurer National Council. 



The cumulative results of cuts in the domestic mis- 
sion field are most serious, both in the effect upon 
the men concerned and on the work itself. The with- 
drawal of support up to a certain point stimulated 
local giving but it has been far too rapid to be made 
up from local resources. The clergy have been forced 
steadily down to a narrower margin of subsistence. 
A disheartening experience ! However little they 
may acknowledge it or feel it for themselves, they 
feel keenly the effects upon their families. 

In many places, the one method in which the dis- 
tricts have been able to absorb the reductions has 
been by not filling vacancies when they occurred in 
the clergy staff. This means that in some instances 
whole fields have gone uncared for. These fields 
have not been single parishes but whole groups of 
mission congregations. In other instances the remain- 
ing clergy, already few and overworked, have spread 
their efforts to carry on in the field of the withdraw- 
als. The coverage has become thinner and thinner 
with an inevitable decrease in pastoral care and ad- 
ministrative efficiency. To make the situation even 
more difficult, as the areas of responsibility have been 
expended, the allowances fo rtravel have been re- 
duced, until now no provision is made for the run- 
ning and upkeep of automobiles. 

Naturally all extension work has ceased and we 
are losing golden opportunities where the Church is 
both wanted and needed. Just to fill existing gaps 
in our domestic missionary staff and restore the work 
in our domestic fields to the point at which the cuts 
began, would require forty men. If we were to go 
further and take up the opportunities now facing us, 
eighty or a hundred would be needed. And the great- 
er tragedy is the fact that we have the men but not 
the money! 

THE RT. REV. FREDERICK B. BARTLETT, 
Executive Secretary of the Department 
of Domestic Missions. 



DISCIPLESHIP AND PARTNERSHIP 
BY BISHOP STEWART 



At its annual convention in May the Diocese of 
Chicago inaugurated a courageous program of re- 
covery and advance. Bishop Stewart aroused his 
convention with a stirring address from which the 
following quotations are embodied in the marching 
orders for the whole Church preparing for this 
year's Canvass. 

"It should be said and plainly said from one end 
of the Church to the other that what we need is such 
a revival of solid, sincere, honest, heart-searching 
diseipleship that every person who says in confirma- 



AUGUST-SEPTEMBER, 1935 



5 



tion 'I do take Jesus as niy Lord and Saviour' will 
bring that vow face to face with his income, what- 
ever it is, and be honest to God as he is expected to 
be honest to his country. We all love our country. 
We would die for it. We swiftly resent and repudi- 
ate any slur upon our patriotism. But our country 
nevertheless says to us, 'Let me see your income! It 
is not enough to sing the Star Spangled Banner. You 
are a debtor to your country. Pay me what thou 
owest!' And tax evaders when caught as Al Capone 
was caught, go to jail. 

"Well, we Churchmen profess to love Jesus Christ. 
We claim His Kingdom as our spiritual patria ; we 
put the cross even above the flag. We would die for 
Him, at least we say we would. And not a few 
Christians have done so. Now the question is per- 
tinent: Can we sing 'In the Cross of Christ I glory' 
and 'I love thy kingdom, Lord' and do less for Him 
than we are forced to do for our country? 

"The Church is hindered in her march not by ene- 
mies without, but by false disciples within, and after 
all, money is a counter not only of trade but of love, 
an index not only of a nation's credit, but also of a 
Christian's sincerity, a measure not only of the pros- 
perity of a state, but also of the prosperity of a soul. 

"I call yon in 1935 to a task, but first of all I call 
you to a heart-searching renewal of true disciple- 
ship. A task without such discipleship is a difficult 
and disagreeable job. A discplesliip without a task 
is a feeble and bloodless sham. Harness to the task a 
sacrficial discipleship and the result is a triumph 
offered upon the altar and laid at the Master's feet. 

' I plead for partnership. Partnership with God 
in His divine enterprise of love, partnership with 
Jesus and His Church which is His Body, partner- 
ship with each other as parishes and missions in a 
great centenary enterprise, partnership with the Na- 
tional Council in a mission of world redemption, part- 
nership with each other as citizens of a republic, 
partnership of our country with all countries in 
saving a world from war and keeping us in peace 
and brotherliness, partnership with all our brothers 
and sisters who need our help in their day of great 
distress." 



BISHOP MOSHER PRAISES WORK OF MISS 
GRIFFIN 



On the morning of March 23, 1931, Miss Griffin 
arrived in the Mission to take up the work of Mission 
Treasurer. It so happened that a meeting of the 
Council of Advice had been called for that afternoon 
and the Bishop asked Miss Griffin to attend that 
meeting as they were to consider a cut in the appro- 
priations which had just been ordered by the 
National Council in New York. She; began her 
work, therefore, with a cut and during this entire 
period of her first term of service we have been cut 



once or twice or three times every year. This last 
January with the Bishop still absent on General 
Convention duty, it was necessary to open the 
accounts for 1935 with that devastating final cut of 
$15,000. The Bishop and the Council of Advice had 
conferred by cable and had made such arrangements 
as were possible in that way, but the burden of 
the application of the cut necessarily fell upon the 
one most conversant with items of the appropri- 
ation. It was a particularly difficult situation for 
any treasurer of the Mission and the Bishop would 
like at this time to record two things. First, his 
appreciation of the capable way in which Miss 
Griffin handled her part of that very difficult task, 
and, secondly, his appreciation of the way the mem- 
ber's of the Mission staff showed her every courtesy 
and gave her every possible help and always with 
good grace and gentle forbearance. Miss Griffin 
never mentions the treatment accorded her by tin; 
Mission staff at that time without expressing her 
very great appreciation of their thoughtful consid- 
eration. These two things have made this year a: 
least bearable in the midst of so much that is trying 
and discouraging. 

I feel sure all of the Mission join with me in 
wishing Miss Griffin pleasant trips both going and 
returning for her furlough and assure her of a 
cordial welcome when she again resumes the work 
of her office next year. And I am sure that there 
are none of us who do not hope that she may have 
the pleasure, during her next term of service, on 
working in the Treasurer's office of a Mission that 
is on the up-grade rather than on the down grade. 

G. F. MOSHER 



AUXILIARY NEWS 

I am very sorry to announce that Mrs. Bessie Stew- 
art, Diocesan Supply Chairman, and Miss Jessie 
Peace, Church Periodical Club Secretary, have both 
been compelled to give up their work, due to unavoid- 
able circumstanes. 

It gives me great pleasure to announce the appoint- 
ment of Mrs. John H. Bonner of Washington as Sup- 
ply Chairman, and I ask for her the same hearty sup- 
port you have always given this real Missionary 
work. She will soon send out the fall assignments. 

Miss Elizabeth Griffin, who has been in the Philip- 
pine Islands for the past four and a half years, land- 
ed in New York City on September 10th. She will 
be in New Bern for a fall vacation,, with her sister, 
Mrs. 0. L. Ives and 1 hope that many of the Auxili- 
aries will have the privilege of hearing of her work 
in the Philippines while she is at home. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Marshall, of Tokio, Japan, 
expect to be home on furlough sometime this fall, 
and while here will be with the Rev. and Mrs. A. H 
Marshall, Southport. ANNA ROSE OUTLAND. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



SUMMER CONERENCE AT CAMP LEACH 



Despite the fact that the regular summer camps 
were not held at Camp Leach this summer due to the 
infantile paralysis condition, thirty-eight senior 
campers spent a most enjoyable week there the first 
week in September. 

The regular schedule of instruction, athletics, and 
entertainment was maintained until Friday night. 
From that time through Sunday noon the Camp en- 
tertained the Y. P. S. L. Convention. At the ban- 
quet Friday night, Rev. George Henry of Durham. 
N. C, spoke most forcefullly on "Vessels Meet for 
the Master's Use." 

On Thursday night the wind storm gave many 
campers considerable uneasiness, and during Satur- 
day night a terriffic electric storm struck Camp. We 
were fortunate in escaping all damage either to 
campers or property for which we were truly thank- 
ful. 

Though the camping period was just half its usual 
duration, we feel that this Camp was of inestimable 
value due to the wonderful spirit of both the staff 
and. the campers. 

The following awards were won: 

Ribbons to Groups One and Two of the girls in a 
•tie. Ribbon to Group Two of the boys. 

Certificates for best campers to Mary Graham, Bes- 
sie Fay Hunt, Miriam Gaylord, Elizabeth Ammons, 
Jack Tillinghast, Mary Elizabeth Bell, Alice Alli- 
good, Harvey Elliott, Axum Smith, Harry Bowden, 
Graham Elliott, Worthington Harris, Cleveland 
Dekle. 

Best girl camper — Elizabeth Ammons. Best boy 
camper — Graham Elliott. 

Y. P. S. L. shield— Christ Church, New Bern. 

Ten-Point Pennants to St, John's, Fayetteville ; 
St. Paul's, Wilmington; Tolar-Hart, Good Shepherd, 
Fayetteville ; Christ Church, New Bern. 

The Staff of the Camp and the campers were : 

Staff: Director— Rev. G. S. Gresham, Goldsboro ; 
Business Manager — Rev. Stephen Gardner, Wash- 
ington; Nurse — Frances Ware, Wilson; Bugler — 
John Bonner, Washington ; Secretary, Estelle 
Greene, Greenville; Swimming Directors — Maxine 
W.estphal, Fayetteville; Cleveland Dekle, Norfolk 
Va. ; Vernon Cannon, Ayden; Dramatic Director — 
Katharine Harding, Washington; Director of Ath- 
letics — Rev. James Beckwith, Clinton; Dietician — 
Mrs. J. S. Nunnelee, Washington; Teachers — Rev. 
W. R. Noe, Wilmington ; Rev. Alexander Miller, Wil- 
mington ; Rev. James Beckwith, Clinton; Rev. Ed- 
ward Moseley, Williamston; Counsellors — Elizabeth 
White Perkins, Greenville; Elizabeth Andrews, 
Greenville; Rev. Lawrence Fenwick, Beaufort; Rev. 
John Hardy, Columbia. 

Campers : Johnnie Benton, Lumberton ; Alex Bon- 
ner, Washington ; John Bonner, Washington ; Harry 



Bowden, Wilmington; Billy Daniels, Wilmington; 
Jack Daniels, Wilmington; Cleveland Dekle, Nor- 
folk; Sam Dees, Greenville; Graham Elliott, Wash- 
ington; Harvey Elliott, Washington; William Hard- 
ing, Jr., Washington; Worthington Harris, New 
Bern; Hugh Phelps, Washington; Angus Ray, Fay- 
etteville ; Edwin Robinson, Vanceboro ; William B. 
Rodman, IV, Washington: A.xum Smith, Belhaven; 
Norman Woodcock, Wilmington; Alice Alligood, 
Fayetteville : Elizabeth Ammons, New Bern ; Mary 
Elizabeth Bell^ Washington; Emily Biggs, Fayette- 
ville ; Jean Brown, Wilmington ; Florence Davis, Wil- 
mington; Julia Everette, Williamston; Nell Ferrell, 
Clinton; Camille Gaskins, Windsor; Mary Gault, 
Lake Waccamaw; Miriam Gaylord, Wilmington; 
Mary Graham, Clinton; Bessie Fay Hunt, Wilming- 
ton ; Vashti Jordan, Vanceboro ; Bettie Frances Long*, 
Washington ; Evelyn Loughlin, Southport ; Dorothy 
Reed Miller, Wilmington; Mary Rosborough, Wil- 
mington; Sarah Sawyer, Windsor; Jack Tillinghast, 
Fayetteville. 

Convention Delegates : Herman Barwick, Seven 
Springs ; Roy Biggs, Fayetteville ; Anne Brooks, New 
Bern ; Nell Carpenter, Wilmington ; Billy Cobb, Kin- 
ston ; Mary Janice Cobb, Kinston ; Ann Bright Daw- 
son, Kinston; Fred Graves, Kinston; John Harts- 
fieild, New Bern; Eva Hardy, Seven Springs; Ernest 
Irvinti-, Wilmington : John Clarence Myers, Wilming- 
ton ; Mrs. Alexander Miller, Wilmington ; Elinor 
Nelson, New Bern; Jack Ottoway, Wilmington; Roy 
Packer, Fayetteville; Christine Tripp, New Bern; 
Delilah Whitfield, Kinston; Melvin Whitfield, Kin- 
ston. 

GEORGE S. GRESHAM, Director. 



NEWS 

Since the June issue of the Mission Herald, the 
Rev. Arthur J. Mackie has taken charge of the work 
at St. James', Belhaven; St. George's, Lake Landing; 
St. Matthew's. Yeatecville; Calvary, Swan Quarter; 
All Saints', Fairfield, and St. John's, Sladesville: 
and the Rev. Wm. M. Latta has moved from Lum- 
berton to Windsor to take charge of St. Thomas', 
Windsor; Grace Churach, Woodville; Holy Inno- 
cents', Avoca and St. Mark's, Roxobel. 



REV. HENRY F. KLOMAN CALLED TO FARM- 
VILLE FIELD 

The Rev. Henry F. Kloman has been caleld to Em- 
manuel, Farmville; St. Barnabas', Snow Hill, and 
Trinity, Chicowinity, and it is hoped that he will ac-. 
cept. Mr. Kloman served these churches during May 
and June, and then went to Englewood, N. J. for 
some church work during July, August and Sep- 
tember. 



AUG UST-SEFTEMB" FR, 1935 



LETTER TO CHRISTMAS BOX SECRETARY 



Gordonsville, Va. 
July 8, 1935. 
Mrs. A. T. St.Amand, 
120 South 16th Street, 
Wilmington, N. C. 
Dear Mrs. St.Amand: 

Before leaving Japan on furlough I should have 
acknowledged a letter of yours to Miss Foote 
enclosing a check for $20.00 for Christmas gifts for 
the Sunday School children in the District of Kyoto. 
Your letter was dated October 24th and at that time 
I was acting as treasurer of that fund, Miss Foote 
turning over the letters to me. I have never an- 
swered yours, I believe, as it is here in my letter 
file. The fund, however, was turned into yen and 
used, cash December mostly for the 'Christmas cele- 
brations at St. Barnabas' Hospital, Osaka, the Kyoto 
Day Nursery and several of our country Churches 
and kindergartens, principally those at Nara and 
Fukui. 

I have had long experience with these places 
and know the uses your contributions are put to. 
They are certainly appreciated and your Diocese 
was mentioned in the thanksgiving. 

You were thoughtful enough to express the hope 
that "the terribly high wind" of September 21st 
last did not cripple us very much. It did. Unfor- 
tunately the officers at "281" did not want to make 
too prominent any further appeals at that time of 
falling off in missionary contributions and so not 
much prominence was given the damage and our 
need. We had to use (borrow) from other funds 
and restore immediately roofs and windows and 
repair the destruction. I don't know when the 
Department of Missions will ever get this money for 
us. We had to borrow and have paid back all but 
about $8550.00. I suppose the Department will save 
this appeal until the whole work gets on . its feet 
again. 

Wishing you and your Diocese success in the 
Church's work. I am, 

Sincerely yours. 

J. J. CHAPMAN 



REMOVAL OF THE NAG'S HEAD CHURCH TO 
A BETTER PLACE 



In answer to a call given out a goodly number <of 
friends of the Church met at the Drane oettage, 
Nag's Head, on Tuesday, September 3rd, and organ- 
ized by recognizing the Rev. Robert B. Drane. D. D., 
Priesf-in-Charge of St. Andrew's-by-the-Sea Church, 
and electing as Secretary for the meeting, Mrs. 
Jacqueline Drane Nash, of T;rrhoio. 



The Chairman stated that he 1 ad, at different 
times recently, and by-a number <f rcspci 'able-per- 
sons, been addressed in the interest of removing the 
'Church building to a better location, which measure 
had his approval and was favored also by the Bishop 
and the Rev. George F. Hill, the latter of whom was 
largely instrumental in organizing the first move- 
ment for building a Church here and in the choice 
of its location, which then was central and on good 
ground, (i. e. dry sand). Since that early day the 
face of nature has materially changed and, instead 
of "like a City set on a hill, which cannot be hid" 
the Church, on its underpinning posts, is in a pond 
of rain water, and thereby is difficult of approach, 
which condition repels some from attempting to 
attend the public services there. 

Two surveyors' maps were shown locating good 
lots on the ocean side, owned by Cox and Cox, who 
were willing to exchange them for the vacant lot 
on the ocean side now owned by the Episcopal 
Church. 

It was the unanimous opinion that the exchange 
should be made without delay and the Chairman, 
"with the Rev. Frederick B. Drane, were asked to 
add any others whom they desired, and to serve as 
a Committee to effect the exchange of lots and to 
have the Church removed as soon as practicable. 

Naturally the question was asked "Where was 
the money coming from?", and when the Chairman 
stated that the present meeting had already com- 
plied witli his request for advice, and was not re- 
sponible for financing the movement, it was the 
sense of all present that everybody would gladly 
contribute to defray the cost. 

And so the meeting adjourned with many expres- 
sions of pleasure that it had been held. They under- 
stood the attitude of the Priest-in-Charge of the 
Unorganized Mission Station that he felt reluctant 
to act without some such formal support as had 
then been given, for which he heartily thanked them. 



THE UNITED THANK OFFERING NUMBER OF 

THE SPIRIT OF MISSIONS WILL BE 

OUT IN OCTOBER 



Women of the Church are working for its dis- 
tribution, and for yearly subscriptions), to stimulate 
interest in the U. T. O. and to celebrate the One-Hun- 
dredth Birthday of The Spirit of Missions. 

See any officer of the Woman's Auxiliary in your 
parish. 

Order the U. T. O. Number. Subscribe for a year. 
THE SPIRIT OF MISSIONS 
Church Missions House 
281 Fourth Avenuet, New York. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



The Mission Herald 

ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 

Published Monthly except July and August at 

507 Southern Building 
WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF ~ 

Editor 

REV. WALTER R. NOE 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 

RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 

MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 
Advertising rates furnished on application. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to receive 
their papers, should promptly notify the Business Man- 
ager, giving when necessary, both the old and new ad- 
dress. 



SOME OF OUR OBJECTIVES FOR THIS FALL 



1. The Mission Herald, the official organ of the 
Diocese of East Carolina, in every home in the 
Diocese. 

2. The payment by each parish and mission, of 
the full amount that we were told to expect for the 
work of the Diocese and General Church. 

3. A well organized Church School, and active 
Senior and Junior Service Leagues in each parish 
and mission. 

4. An Every Member Canvass that is carefully 
prejared for and properly conducted. 

5. A real Forward Movement in each parish and 
mission. 

6. A special effort in each parish and mission 
to collect and remit to the Treasurer of the Diocese 
by October 15th, at least the amount promised for 
Diocesan and General Church work for the first 
nine months. 

7. General interest in Bishop's Anniversary Fund. 

8. The adoption of the Bishop's Pence Plan by 
a larger number of parishes and missions. 

9. A larger part in the work of the General 
Church, 

30. A Rural Work Program for the Diocese. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



The Mission Herald is published monthly, except 
July and August, and the subscription price is $1.00 
a year, payable in advance. It needs the support 



of every family in the Diocese. If you are not n 
subscriber, please send $1.00 for a subscription for 
the next year, to the Business Manager, Rev. W. R. 
Noq, Wilmington, N. C. If your subscription has 
expired, a renewal will be appreciated. 



THE FORWARD MOVEMENT 



Plans for the Forward Movement in the Diocese 
.of East Carolina, will be considered by the clergy 
at a conference to be held at Camp Leach, September 
24th and 25th, 1935. 

The whole Church is interested in the Forward 
Movement, and the people of the Diocese of East 
Carolina will want to do their part to make the 
movement a success. 

There has been a Church-wide reception of the 
pamphlets of the National Commission on Daily 
Bible Reading and Meditation. The clergy and ves- 
tries of our parishes and missions can be of real 
help to their people by furnishing these pamphlets 
to them. 

The National Commission will issue regular Bible 
Reading and Meditation helps throughout the Church 
Year., 

The new series will bear the standing title : For- 
ward Day by Day. The issues will appear as 
follows : 

Late Trinity, October-November, ready September 
10, 1935; Advent-Christmas, December, ready No- 
vember 9, 1935; Epiphany-Pre-Lent, January-Feb- 
ruary, ready Decmber 16. 1935; Lent, March-April, 
ready February 5, 1936; Easter-Pentecost, April-May 
ready March 21, 1936; Trinity (first half), Summer 
months, ready May 11,1936. 

The cost of each issue will be only 2c a copy, $1 .00 
for 50 postpaid. 



THE WITNESS TO FEATURE SERIES OF 

ARTICLES ON "PHASES OF THE 

FORWARD MOVEMENT'' 



As a part of the present Forwarl Movement of the 
Church, The Witness, national Church weekly, is 
cooperating with the commission by featuring a 
series of articles on "Phases of the Forward Move- 
ment". The first of the series is to appear in the 
September 19th issue of the paper and they are to 
i-un for fourteen consecutive weeks. The authors, 
and their subjects are as follows : 

"New Loyalties" by the Rt. Rev. Henry W. Hob- 
son, chairman of the Forward Movement Commis- 
sion. "The Need for Evangelism" by the Rev. 
Karl M. Block. "The Inner Life" by the Rt. Rev. 



AUGUST-SEPTEMBER, 1935 



Edward M. Cross, Bishop of Spokane. "The Chal- 
lenge to Youth" by the Rev. C. Leslie Glenn. "Prac- 
tical Things To Do" by the Rt. Rev. Clinton S. Quin, 
Bishop of Texas. "Consecrated Money" by the 
Rt. Rev. Benj. M. Washburn, Bishop Coadjutor of 
Newark. "The Task of the Forward Movement" 
by the Rt. Rev. George Craig Stewart, Bishop of 
Chicago. "Why I am for the Church" by Charles 
P. Taft of Cincinnati. "The Demand for a New 
Order" by the Rt. Rev. Edward L. Parsons, Bishop 
of California. "Children and the Forward Move- 
ment" by Dr. Adelaide T. Case, Professor at Teach- 
ers' College, Columbia University. "The Plans of 
One Diocese" by the Rt. Rev. Cameron J. Davis, 
Bishop of Western New York. Conserving Our 
Heritage" by the Hon. George Wharton Pepper. 
"Training for Christian Living" by Hilda Shaul, 
Director of Religious Education, St. Paul's Church, 
Chestnut Hill, Pa. "More Practical Things To Do" 
by the Rev. W. Appleton Lawrence, Rector of Grace 
Church, Providence, R. I. 

Rectors are urged to take The Witness in bundles 
during this period in order that the paper may be 
on sale each week at the Church door, and also 
used in parish discussion groups. Single subscrip- 
tions at $2 a year should be sent to the Chicago 
office of the paper at 6140 Cottage Grove Avenue. 



PRESIDENTS AND THE BIBLE 



By Rev. Ralph V. Gilbert 



"Above all, the pure and benign light of Revela- 
tion has had a meliorating influence on mankind, 
and increased the blessings of society .... It is 
impossible to govern the world without the Bible." 
—GEORGE WASHINGTON 

"The Bible is the best book in the world." 

—JOHN ADAMS 

"I have always said and always will say that the 
studious perusal of the Sacred Volume will make 
better citizens, better fathers, and better husbands. 
. . . The Bible is the corner stone of liberty." 

—THOMAS JEFFERSON 

"So great is my veneration for the Bible that 
the earlier my children begin to read it the more 
confident will be my hope that they will prove 
useful citizens of their country and respectable 
members of society. . . . The Bible is the book of 
all others to be read at all ages, and in all conditions 
of human life." —JOHN QUINCY ADAMS 

"The Bible— the rock upon which our Republic- 
rests. ' ' —ANDREW JACKSON 

"It was for the love of the truths of this great 



and good book that our fathers abandoned their 
native shores for the wilderness." 

— ZACHARY TAYLOR 

"I am profitably engaged in reading the Bible. 
Take all of this book upon reason that you can and 
the balance by faith, and you will live and die a 
better man. . ..The best book which God has given 
to man."— .ABRAHAM LINCOLN 

"Hold fast to the Bible as the sheet anchor of 
your liberties; write its precepts on your hearts 
and practice them in your lives. To the influence 
of this book we are indebted for the progress made, 
and to this we must look as our guide in the future." 

—ULYSSES S. GRANT. 

"If you blot out of your statute book, your Con- 
stitution, your family life, all that is taken from the 
Sacred Book, what would there be left to bind 
society together?"— BENJAMIN HARRISON. 

"No other book ever written in any other tongue 
has ever affected the whole life of a people, as the 
Authorized Version of the Scriptures has affectel 
the English-speaking peoples." 

—THEODORE ROOSEVELT 

"The Bible is the word of life — it is a picture 
of the human heart displayed for all ages and all 
sorts and conditions of men — I am sorry for the men 
who do not read the Bible every day. I wonder 
why they deprive themselves of the strength and 
pleasure. ' '— WOODROW WILSON. 

"There is no other book with which the Bible 
can be compared, and no other reading that means 
so much to the human race. It is the support of 
the strong and the consolation of the weak ; the 
dependence of organized government and the foun- 
dation of religion."— CALVIN COOLIDGE, 

"There is no other book so various as the Bible 
nor one so full of concentrated wisdom. Whether 
it be of law, business, morals or that vision which 
leads the imagination in the creation of constructive 
enterprises for the happiness of mankind, he who 
seeks for guidance . . . may look inside its covers 
and find illumination. ... As a nation we are in- 
debted to the Book of books for our national ideals 
and representative institutions." 

—HERBERT HOOVER 

"I feel that a comprehensive study of the Bible 
is a liberal education for anyone. Nearly all of 
the great men of our country have been well versed 
in teachings of the Bible, and I sincerely hope that 
the habit of Bible study will be developed among 
the people."— FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT 

Supreme Council Bulletin '33 Degrees. 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD 



LAKE KANUGA CONFERENCES 



corner; Gimp Leach, first place exhibit by young- 
People's diocesan camp. 



Kanuga Lake, conference center of the Episcopal 
Church, near Hendersonville, will be closed in Sep- 
tember after its eighth season of 'ownership and 
operation by the dioceses of East Carolina, Western 
North Carolina and the two South 'Carolina dioceses 
as camp, conference and resort center. 

Despite the newspaper hysteria concerning the 
infantile paraylsis in North Carolina, Kanuga had 
a very successful season, the Young People's Con- 
ference being especially well attended and the 
Adult Conference having almost a maximum crowd, 
with representatives from 21 Dioceses and 2 mis- 
sionary districts, 126 churches being represented, 
with 15 having five or more members present. 
Among those present for the Adult conference were : 
The Pit. Rev. K. G. Pinlay, diocese of Upper South 
Carolina, director of the Kanuga conferences; the 
Rt. Rev. A. S. Thomas, South Carolina, director of 
the Clergy conference ; the Rt. Rev. R. E, Gribbin, 
Western North Carolina ; the Rev. John Long Jack- 
son, Charlotte, director of the Adult conference; the 
Rev. C. Rankin Barnes, Executive Secretary for 
the Department of Christian. Social Service of the 
National Council, and the Rev. Arthur M. Sherman, 
■S. T. D., Cincinnati, associate secretary for the For- 
ward Movement. 

The Rt. Rev. Henry St. George Tucker, bishop of 
Virginia, spent the guest period at Kanuga with 
his family, and the Rt. Rev. J. N. Atwood, formerly 
missionary bishop to Arizona was also at Kanuga 
during August. 

A beautiful brass cross was presented to the 
furnishings for the permanent chapel to be erected 
at Kanuga by the members of the Woman's Auxili- 
ary of the diocese of Western North Carolina, in 
memory of the Rev. J. W. Cantey Johnson, hit' 1 
rector of St. Mark's Church, Gastonia and director 
of the adult conferences at Kanuga. 

The Twilight Services, always a popular feature 
of the Kanuga program, were led during the young 
people's conferences and guest period by Bishop 
Finlay and during the Adult conference by Bishop 
Gribbin and the Rev.. Thorne Sparkman, Baltimore, 
Md. 

The Forward Movement was brought prominently 
into the summer program in specialsermons, in talks 
at Twilight Services and io themes for some of the 
classes during the conferences. Dr. Sherman's 
presence at Kanuga during the adult and clergy 
conferences and with his family during the guest 
period, added greatly to the interest in the Forward 
Movement. 

Among those winning awards in the exhibits of 
work done in Church Schools and parishes were: 
St. John's. Fayetteville, 1st place, most artistic and 
completely worked out project; 1st place Prayer 



RESOLUTIONS 



Adopted by the Vestry of St. Mary's Church, 
Gatesville at its meeting July 14th. 1935, on the 
passing away of Edward R. Roberts. 

WHEREAS, Mr. Edward R. Roberts was a former 
Clerk to the Vestry, and for a number of years 
prior to his death Senior Warden and a loyal mem- 
ber all his life of St. Mary's Church, Gatesville, arid 

WHEREAS, he contributed of his time and means, 
and always supported the Rector in every worth- 
while program; and 

WHEREAS, by his exalted character he was at all 
times an inspiration and a blessing 
THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, That the Vestry 
of St. Mary's Church, Gatesville, express here its 
deep gratitude for the life and influence of Mr. 
Roberts, its profound sense of loss in his removal 
from our midst, sympathy for his family and all 
who are bereft by his going. 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, That a copy of 
these resolutions be sent to Mrs. Roberts, to the 
Mission Herald and that they be spread upon the 
minutes of this Board. 

LEON M ALONE, Rector 
G. D. GATLING 
! J. J. RIDDICK 

FRONTIS RIDDICK 
WM. R. COWPER 



A TRIBUTE OF LOVE 



Gone Home — Sweet and gentle and very lovely 
our deai- friend and co-worker, Mrs. Ella Dill Mann, 
passed to Life Eternal from the home of her son, 
Mr. C. A. Mann. Washington, N. C. on Wednesday 
night July 3rd. She was 83 years old. Devoted 
to her Church and its interest, she became a "charter 
member" of The Woman's Auxiliary of Lake Land- 
ing, N. C. when it was organized more than forty 
years ago. We shall always miss her, for all through 
the long years her love, loyalty and helpfulness has 
been an inspiration to us, her presence at our meet- 
in • s a benediction, yet we bow in humble submission 
to His will, knowing all ; s well with her. 

To her family we extend our deepest sympathy, 
commendng tl em to Him whom she loved, trusted 
and served so long. ■ , ; 

"There is no Death — the stars go down to rise 
upon some fairer shore, 

And safe in Heaven's jeweled crown, they shine 
f orevermore — ' ' 

MRS. MATTIE DAVIS 
MRS. LENA S. JENNETTK 
MRS. ANNIE PAYNE 



AUGUST-SEPTEMBER, 1935 



11 



FROM OUR MISSIONARY 



DISTRICT NO. 6 GET-TOGETHER MEETING 



Miss Venetia Cox, of Wuchang, China, writes that 
she has direected two major musical concerts this 
year. The first was a Sacred Concert by the choir 
of St. Hilda's sehool. An excerpt from a newspaper 
clipping says: 

The concert reflecting the greatest credit upon 
the tireless work which Miss Cox devotes to the 
musical training of these Chinese girls.. One is 
always deeply impressed by their perfect English 
enunciation and their amazing memories. They sang 
the anthems without referring to music or words, 
and could thus concentrate upon every nuance of 
expression which the conductor desired to indicate. 
The result, in both aesthetic and devotional appeal 
was indeed admirable, and the performance in con- 
sequence was greeted with unanimous praise. 

These musical services at St. Hilda's are greatly 
appreciated in Wuchang and Hankow: they encour- 
age everyone with a heart-warming sense of inter- 
national brotherhood, since music is the only lan- 
guage universally understood. Its appeal, too, 
renders our religious instincts wonderfully articu- 
late, and its winsome power, so triumphantly over- 
riding the inadequacies of faltering speech, reveals 
in true Christian fashion the spirits of all men as 
one. — Selected. 



Plymouth 



CONVOCATION OF EDENTON 



Columbia, N. C, 
June 20, 1935. 



Mr. W. R. Noe, 
Wilmington, N.C. 



Dear Mr. Noe : 

I am very anxious to have a special page in the 
Mission Herald from the Convocation of Edenton 
as many times during the year as possible. Won't 
you please have the write-ups of our Get-together 
Meetings enclosed, published under the heading of 
the Edenton Convocation. Would appreciate your 
putting these together and not in different parts 
of your next issue if you can conveniently do so. 

Thanking you for your interest and assistance 
and wishing you and your family a very pleasant 
summer, I am 

Very sincerely, 

MAY C CARAWAN 
(Mrs. W. S. Carawan) 



The annual Get-together Meeting of the 6th Dis- 
trict was held in Roper, Tuesday, May 20th. It was 
a most enjoyable and helpful meeting. Creswell, 
Columbia, Roper and Plymouth comprise this di- 
trict. 

The services were begun with the celebration of 
the Holy Communion by Rev. Sidney Matthews. 
During the taking of the offering Mrs. Walter 
Starr of Creswell sang a lovely sacred song, then 
the President, Miss Gussie Carstarphen called the 
business meeting to order. The minutes of the last 
meeting were read and approved. The address of 
welcome was given by Mrs. Chesson, the response 
by Mrs. Sidney Ward of Plymouth. The roll call 
was responded to by 47 members with delegates 
from each of the 4 parishes telling their most out- 
standing work for the year. By-laws for the organi- 
zation were submitted by our Convocational Presi- 
dent and were adopted as read. The following- 
officers were elected for a period of three years: 
Miss Ida Peacock, President; Mrs. W. R. Hampton,, 
Vice-President; Mrs. Gaylord, Secretary; Miss Essie 
Mason, Treasurer; Mrs. Walter Starr, Publicity 
Chairman. 

A play written by Mrs. Carawan showing how our 
1935 apportionments will be used was given by Mrs. 
J. B. Edmundson, Mrs. W. R. Hampton, Mrs. Sidney 
Ward, Mrs, Jean Lyon, Mrs. Minnie Cahoon, Mrs. 
H. L. Alexander and Miss Iola Harrell. 

Mrs. Carawan gave a most interesting account of 
the Convention held in Beaufort and explained "The 
God's Acre Covenant Plan" which was presented 
at the mass meeting at the Convention. She urged 
the members in each parish to adopt this plan, say- 
ing she thought it would be a splendid way to help 
bring more interest and activity for Christ by each 
member. The Rev. J. W. Hardy made an address 
on the "Forward Movement" and Miss Dona Bell 
Weatherly gave an interesting account of her work 
at the Galilee Mission in Tyrell County. Meeting 
adjourned to a most delightful luncheon at which 
time Mr. Matthews made a talk about Camp Leach. 
Then the courtesy committee made a report showing 
this to be one of the most inspiring and interesting 
meetings that we have had. Much of the success 
of the meeting was given to our very capable and 
remarkable president, Miss Gussie Carstarphen, who 
is now over seventy years old. 

MRS. W. R HAMPTON 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD 



DISTRICT MEETING WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 
NUMBER VII 



Elizabeth City 



The annual District meeting of the Woman's Aux- 
iliary of Eastern Carolina was held in Holy Trinity 
Church, Hertforl, April 24, 1935, with Mrs. C. F. 
Hill of Elizabeth City as president. There were 
seventy-six members present. The meeting was 
opened with a hymn, followed by a prayer by Mr. 
Jillson, rector of Holy Trinity. Mrs. W. E. White 
gave the address of welcome. She also read a poem, 
"Be Neighborly", which made us feel we would 
always be welcomed. Mrs. C. W. Melick responded 
to this and extended an invitation to meet in Eliza- 
beth City next year. 

The reports from the six organizations present 
were very interesting. Each one gained helpful 
information on what they might 'lo in their own 
group. St. Mary's of Edenton, told of a Heinz 
supper they had. St. Mary's of Elizabeth City told 
of thirteen years service they have given in dressing 
an orphan. Also of a Building & Loan Fund started 
for this girl which will pay her $125.00 when she 
graduates this year. St. Catherine's of Elizabeth 
City told of a Quilt Exhibit and Card Party. The 
division of organiztion into small groups was dis- 
cussed. Mrs. McMullan, of Elenton, said theirs had 
not proved satisfactory. Christ Church of Elizabeth 
City reported their organization had been greatly 
benefitted by division into three small "-roups., 

Miss Mae Wood Winslow gave us a clever article 
of fourteen points on "How To Kill A Church." 
Also some suggestions of things to do to help a 
Church. 

The By-Laws for the Auxiliary as drawn up by 
Mrs. Summerell, Mrs. Houtz and Mrs. Smith were 
adopted as read. 

The Honor Roll for the past year Avas read by 
Mrs. Sidney McMullan. 

The President appointed the following committees: 
Nominating Committee — Mrs. McMullan, Mrs. Mel- 
ick, Mrs. Nixon. Courtesy Committee — Mrs. Pruden, 
Mrs. Will Morrisette, Mrs. E. R, Outlaw. 

Mrs. Outland, our Diocesan President, talked to us 
about Kanuga, which we are aways anxious to hear 
about. She explained the summer courses given 
and the amount of cost. 

Mrs. Bessie Stewart of Elizabeth City was asked 
to give her report as Supply Secretary but said as 
yet she did not know anything about her work. 

Mrs J. P. Greenleaf of Elizabeth City sang a 
beautiful solo with Mrs. W. P. Duff as accompanist. 

After the noon-day prayers led by Mr. Jillson, Mrs. 
Fred Outland told us about the work of our district 



for the coming year. She told us of the gift to be 
presented to Bishop Darst at the meeting in Beau- 
fort as a token of our appreciation of his twenty 
years of service.. She called to our attention in- 
stances showing the great need of our help to the 
missionaries, reminding us of the great sacrifices 
they make. She told us how Dr. and Mrs. Tucker, 
missionaries in China, on their last visit to the United 
States, had to leave three of their five children here 
for their education and will not see them again for 
five years. Our advance work is for the "House of 
Light", which is the kindergarten at Kyoto, where 
Miss Schiles is working. Mrs. Outland explained 
what is meant by The Forward Movement. It is 
nothing new. We are simply asked to do the old 
things better; to keep before us the miracle of 
growth. She suggested a book for Lent, "The Re- 
vealing Christ". The leaflet "Disciple" which wo 
used during Lent should be followed by "Disciples 
of Christ" to be used now. "If we be His Dis- 
ciples" is the theme of our subject. We are told 
to follow near — not afar off. Peter would never 
have denied Christ had he been close enough to 
take His hand. We should look for opportunities 
to work ; learn more about our work ; and live to do 
our work ; ' ' Let us take our places beside our Bishop 
and do our Master's work". Mrs. Outland ex- 
plained that our Diocesan project for the next year 
is to raise $300.00 to have a student worker at East 
Carolina, in Greenville. We had to let Mrs. Howard 
go because we did not have the money to keep her. 

After a hymn and prayers we went over to the 
Parish House to a delightful lunch served by the 
hostesses. The committees were called upon to re- 
port. Mrs. W. E. White of Hertford was elected 
President and Mrs. J. T. Stevenson of Elizabeth 
Oity as Vice President. Miss Mary Pruden of Eden- 
ton, was elected District Publicity Chairman. 

The meeting adjourned and after "goodbyes" we 
started homeward with new ideas for a new year. 

ELOISE CHESSON GARD, Secretary. 



DISTRICT MEETING WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 



Aurora 



District No. 4 of the Woman's Auxiliary of the. 
Convocation of Edenton held its annual Get-Togeth"r 
meeting at St. Thomas' Episcopal Church, Bath, N. C. 
May 17, 1935. 

At 10.30 o'clock Rev. Sidney E. Mathews adminis- 
tered the Holy Communion, t 11.00 o'clock the 
business session was opened with the address of 
welcome by Miss Mary Tankard to which Mrs. F. G. 
Jordan responded. Then followed minutes, roll cad 
and appointment of committees. Mrs, Shelbourne 



AUGUST-SEPTEMBER, 1935 



13 



talked to us about the Honor Roll. "Chart of 
Achievement" she called it, and referred to the 
annual for the requirements. 

The by-laws to be adopted by all the districts 
were read by the chairman and were unanimously 
adopted by this district. They have been recorded 
in the back of the minute book was suggested by Mrs. 
Carawan. 

. Motion was made and carried to take an offering 
at each district meeting to send to Bishop Darst to 
use in his work. 

Tn the absence of Mrs. Carawan, Mrs. John Bon- 
ner read fourteen points that will help kill a Church. 
Mr. Matthews had noon day prayers. Hymn 464 
was sung. 

Mrs. W. A. Darden spoke of Church Publicity. 
She says "The active person is one who knows 
what the Church is about. To be active you have 
to read Diocesan papers and attend meetings. She 
suggested that one be appointed in each parish to 
take subscriptions to the Spirit of Missions, The 
Mission Herald and other Church Papers. She men- 
tioned Kanuga and urged that as many as possible 
attend the adult conference for two weeks. 

Mrs. Outland made an interesting talk. She told 
of the Conference at Beaufort and the Silver Loving 
Cup, the Book of Remembrance and also the purse 
of $500, which were presented to Bishop Darst. 
She spoke of Dr. Milton's five-year plan to free the 
Diocese of debt. 

Bishop Darst has given us as our summer work a 
fund to raise to help prepare two young men for the 
ministry. ffl 

The next meeting will be held at Zion. Officers 
for the following three years are Mrs. Edgar Doug- 
las, President ; Mrs. W. S. Arnold, Vice-President ; 
Mrs. W. A. Buys, Secretary and Treasurer; Adelaide 
Watson, Publicity Chairman. 

After singing hymn 538, Mr. Matthews pronounced 
the benediction. The meeting then adjourned to 
the school building where a delicious luncheon was 
served. 

ADELAIDE WATSON, Secretary. 



DISTRICT MEETING WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 



Ayden, May 27th 



The Pitt County Group of the Woman's Auxiliary, 
representing Greenville, Farmville, Ayden, Winter- 
ville and Grifton held its annual meeting at St. 
Paul's Church, Greenville, on Tuesday, May 7, with 
a large attendance. 

The session was opened with a celebration of the 
Holy Communion by Rev. Worth Wicker, rector of 
the parish. 



Following the service, Mrs. G. S. Vought, of Farm- 
ville, president of the district, presided over the 
business session which lasted until the lunch hour 
1 P. M. The address of welcome was made by Mrs. 
Richard Williams of Greenville, and the response by 
Mrs. Waldo Gower of Grifton. 

A roll call of local groups showed members present 
from Ayden 5, Farmville 10, Greenville 15, Grifton 8 
and Winterville 2. 

Reports from the various units was evidence that 
the work of the Auxiliary is progressing in the 
whole field and that notable work had been done 
in some of the parishes and missions. Noon day 
prayers were said by Rev. Mr. Kloman of Farmville. 

Speakers on the program were : Miss Hennie Long 
who gave a history of the Church in Greenville ; 
Mrs. James Joyner, paper on "Notable Women of 
the Bible"; Rev. Worth Wicker "The Forward! 
Movement". A religious pageant, "19>35 Appor- 
tionments of the Woman's Auxiliary in the Diocese 
of East Carolina" was given by a group of girls 
(from East Carolina Teacher's College, who are 
members of the Auxiliary at Students' Center. A 
round table discussion as to how to improve Sunday 
School attendance was a worthwhile feature of the 
day. 

Miss Bessie Brown of Greenville sang a lovely 
solo which added much to the joy of the occasion. 

After the meeting a delicious lunch was served 
in the Parish House by St. Paul's Auxiliary. 

MRS. A. C. D. NOE 



DISTRICT NO. 5 GET-TOGETHER MEETING 



Swan Quarter 



The annual meeting of the Get-Together District 
No. 5, which was held at Calvary Church, Swan 
Quarter on May 10, was opened by the celebration 
of the Holy Communion. 

After a hymn, Mrs. Mettrah Swindell welcomed 
those from other parishes and was answered by Miss 
Jennie McClaud of Lake Landing. Then a reassur- 
ing hymn was sung by Rev. Stephen Gardner, who 
played his own accompaniment. 

The business meeting opened at eleven o'clock 
by Mrs. W. W. Payne, president of the district. The 
minutes were read and corrected and the roll called 
by parishes. Each parish represented gave a sum- 
mary of the years work. The by-laws suggested by 
Mrs. Carawan were read, discussed and adopted as 
they stood. 

Pxirsuant to this committees were appointed. The 
nominating committee was composed of Mrs. T. H 
Jeannette of Lake Landing, Mrs. Eugene Bell. Swan 
Quarter: and Mrs. "Roy Smith, Belhaven. Those on 



14 



THE MISSION HERALI> 



the courtesy committee were Mrs. Helen Lavendar 
and Mrs. Anthony, Belhaven. 

The program which followed the business was 
formed by a series of talks. Miss Virginia Spencer 
gave "Fourteen Points which will help kill your 
Church," Mrs. Laura Brown recalled the "History 
of Calvary Church". And Miss Jacqueline Swindell 
gave a short talk on "The 1935 Apportionments for 
the Diocese". 

At twelve o'clock, Noonday Prayers were said 
and the meeting adjourned for lunch which was 
served in the home economics dining room at the 
school house near by. 

At the afternoon session Mrs. Carawan gave a 
helpful talk with practical suggestions for improv- 
ing our meeting and work. Mrs. Victor Shel- 
bourne, Avho followed Mrs. Carawan on the program, 
gave us bits of news about the Church and a talk 
on the "Forward Movement. Rev. Stephen Gardner 
made several announcements about Camp Leach. 

District officers were elected for the triennium. 
These were : Mrs. George Selby, Lake Landing, Pres- 
ident ; Mrs. Thomas Swindell, Belhaven, Vice Presi- 
dent; Miss Jacqueline Swindell. Swan Quarter, 
Secretary; Mrs. Helen Lavendar, Lake Landing. 
Publicity Chairman. 

After the election of officers the meeting was 
closed by a prayer, to meet next year at Yeatesville. 
MISS JACQUELINE SWINDELL 



DISTRICT NO. 8 GET-TOGETHER MEETING 



Windsor 



The annual meeting of the eighth District of the 
Woman's Auxiliary of the Diocese of East Carolina 
was held in St. Thomas' Church, Windsor, today, 
beginning at ten-thirty with Holy Communion. Epis 
copal women representing all parishes and missions 
of Bertie and Martin counties were in attendance 
in goodly numbers, with Miss Stella Phelps, District 
President, presiding over the business session. In 
the absence of the regular secretary Miss Mary 
Capehart, of Roxobel, acted in that capacity. 

Mrs. F. M. Dunstan extended a welcome for the 
local Auxiliary, i*esponded to by Mrs. Stephen Nor- 
fleet, of Kelford. Interestin2 talks were made by 
Mrs. James G. Staton, of Williamston. Mrs. Fred 
Outland, Diocesan Auxiliary President, of Wash- 
ington, and Rev. A. J. Mackie, rector of St. Thomas'. 
A round table discussion, led by Miss Phelps, proved 
interesting and settled the question of enlarging the 
area of this District in the negative. 

The candidates to attend a conference at Kanuga 
were nominated, with a tie between Mrs. Clover, of 



Williamston, and Miss Julia Askew, of Windsor. 
It is hoped that both will go. 

Noon-day prayers were said by Rev. Edwin Mose- 
ley, of Williamston. 

A trite and amusing set of fourteen "Ways To 
Kill A Church" was read by Mrs. R. W. Askew, 
of Windsor. 

Election of officers resulted in the following; 
President, Miss Effie Waldo, of Hamilton; Vice- 
President, Mrs. Stephen Norfleet, of Kelford; Sec- 
retary, Mrs. Dean, of Hamilton. 

A lovely duet was sung by Mrs. E. S. Perry and 
Mrs. C. J. Sawyer. 

Following the Benediction, pronounced by the 
Rev. Mr. Moseley, luncheon was served at the Wo- 
man's Ciub. 

The next District meeting will be in Woodville. 

MRS. C. J. SAWYER. 



DISTRICT MEETING, WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 
NUMBER IX— GATESVILLE, MAY 23. 



The women of this field, comprising the 9th Dis- 
trict of the Woman's Auxiliary of the Diocese, met 
in St. Mary's Church, Catesville, on the afternoon 
of May 23rd. There were no special speakers or 
Diocesan officers present, but in spite of this it was 
one of the best meetings held in recent years. There 
was a good delegation from each place in the field. 

Mrs. Maude Newsome of Ahoskie "was reelected 
President, Mrs. William Nixon of Sunbury, Vice- 
President, and Mrs. T. W. Costen, Jr.. Secretary 
and Treasurer. 

By-Laws for the organization were presented by 
Miss Ethel Parker and adopted by the group. The 
Rector presented the plan for the Home Church 
School, and later, at the request of the president, he 
explained the "Lord's Acre Covenant Plan" as pre- 
sented to the Missionary mass meeting of the Con- 
vention. May 15, by Rev. Air. Neff of Fletcher, N. C. 
The ladies of Catesville put on a short play which 
had been sent them by Mrs. Carawan, Convocational 
President, which explained the work of the Diocesan 
Woman's Auxiliary, showing what the money paid 
on Apportionments is used for. 

The play ended with a gracious invitation to tea. 
The meeting was closed and all present repaired 
to the lawn where delicious refreshments were 
served, and a delightful social hour was enjoyed. 

ETHEL PARKER 



TO THE SOCIETIES IN THE CONVOCATION 
OF EDENTON 



Dear Co-workers : 

Let me suggest that you do the following: 



AUGUST-SEPTEMBER, 1935 



1. Raise an Educational Fund to be sent to Mrs. 
John Guion, New Bern, to be used by our Bishop 
this fall for two young men who wish to enter the 
ministry. 

2. Fill in the enclosed semi-annual report blanks 
and return to me at once. (By doing these two 
things you will gain two points on the Honor Roll.) 

3. Have regular meetings each month with your 
program that can be used while the members sew 
for the Bureau of Supplies and the needy in your 
community. The needs of the many old, helpless 
and dependent in your own community should be 
a challenge to you when these unfortunate people 
have no one to go to for help. 

4. If you want to increase interest, membership 
and inspiration in the whole work of your Church, 
get each member to try out "God's Acre Covenant 
Plan" which was presented at the Convention in 
Beaufort. 

5. Become more informed about our work by 



15 



having at least as many books in your Auxiliary as 
there are members. These books to be exchanged 
after each meeting of your auxiliary. 

Suggestions for books which will be beneficial to 
begin your auxiliary library 

'"Simple Rules on Parliamentary proceedure." 
Mrs. J. R, Cain, 5e. "The Woman's Auxiliary in 
the Life of the Church" 10c. "Suzuki Looks at 
Japan" (Leaders Manual, 25c), 60c. "Our Church 
and Orientals in America", Free. "Japan To-day", 
Free. "Five Addresses to the Triennial", 10c. 
"The General Church Program", 25c. "Program 
Building" W. A. 55, 15c. "The Spirit of Missions" 
per year, $1.00. 

The above books may be secured from The Church 
Missions House, 281 Fourth Avenue. New York. 

"The Mission Herald" from Rev. W. R. Noe, 
507 Southern Building, Wilmington, N. C. 
Faithfully yours, 

MAY C. CARAWAN 



STATEMENT OF THE AMOUNTS PAID BY THE PARISHES A\D MISSIONS FOR DIOCESAN AND GENERAL 

CHURCH WORK, JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1935. 



Parishes 

Beaufort, St. Paul's } 

Clinton, St. Paul's 

Fayettevllle, St. John's 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 

Hope Mills, Christ Church 

Kinston, St. Mary's 

New Bern, Christ Church 

Red Springs, St. Stephen's 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' .. 

Southport, St. Philip's 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd 

Wilmington, St. James' 

Wilmington St. John's 

Wilmington, St. Paul's 

Organized Missions. 

Burgaw, St. Mary's 

Faison, St. Gabriel's 



Parishes 

Aurora, Holy Cross 

Ayden, St. James 1 

Bath, St. Thomas' . . . 

Belha-ven, St. James' 

Bonnerton, St. John's 

Chocowinity, Trinity ........ 

Columbia, St. Andrew's 

Creswell, St. David's 

Edenton, St. Paul's 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church 

Farmville, Emmanuel 

Gatesville, St. Mary's 

Greenville,. St. Paul's 

Grifton, St. John's ... 

Hamilton, St. Martin's 

Hertford, Holy Trinity ...... 

Jessama, Zion 

Ijake landing. St. George's .. 
Plymouth, Grace Church 

Roper. St. L,uke's 

Washington, St Peter's 

Williamston, Advent 



CONVOCATION OF WILMINGTON. 



Parishes 

Fayetteville. St. Joseph's 
New Bern, St. Cyprian's . . 
Wilmington, St. Mark's . , 



Orirani»<"d Mission* 

Belhaven. St. Mary's 

Fdentnn. St John-Evanerellst 
Elizabeth City, St. Phi'ip's . . 

Goldsboro. St. Andrew's 

Kinston, St. Augustine's .... 
Washington, St. Paul's 



Expec- 


Paid to 


tations 


Sept. 23 


365.20 


$ 95.05 


50.00 


50.00 


2,150 00 


833.26 


1.000.00 


181.01 


60.00 


30.00 


1.000.0C 


500.00 


2.125.00 


946.19 


55.00 


43 00 


200 no 


14.87 


169.60 


109.33 


S71.40 


236.21 


9 781.50 


5,583.08 


2.031.60 


1,219.74 


1,200.00 


418.61 


35.00 


16.16 


65.00 


34.44 


250.00 


72.63 


300.«0 




35.00 


18.42 


350.00 


33.06 


100 00 


46.48 


100.00 




200.00 


100.38 


300.00 


41.50 


1,559 80 


800.09 


1,008.76 


661.65 


238.20 


119.10 


128.00 


22.03 


1.356 20 


890.35 


200.00 


8.10 


65.00 


32.50 


, 400.00 


166 67 


100.00 


42.50 


200.00 


46.30 


200 no 


100.00 


75.00 


50.50 


1,500.00 


890.65 


100.00 


111.19 


OCATION 


OF COLO 


104.00 


io.oo 


420 00 


215.00 


140.00 


121.18 


105.00 


22.82 


101 on 


62 22 


20.15 


10.65 


fin no 


29.74 


75.00 


42.04 


120.00 


30.36 



lyumberton, Trinity 

North West, All Soul's 

PikeviMe. St. George's ... 
Trenton, Grace Church . . . 

Vanceboro, St. Paul's 

Whiteville, Grace Church ., 
Wrightsville, St. Andrews 



Unorganized Missions. 

Jasper, St. Thomas' 

Pollocksville, Mission 

Wilmington, Delgado Mission 



Parochial Missions. 

Campbellton. St. Philip's . . . 
Tolar-Hart, Good Shepherd. 



Expec- 
tations 

174 00 
10.00 
20.00 
15 00 
30.00 

100.00 
6.00 



20.00 
20.00 
10.00 



25.00 
70.00 



Total 



OF EDENTON 

Windsor, St Thomas'... 

Winton, St. John's 

Woodville, Grace Church 



Organized Missions 

Ahosk'e. St. Thomas' 

Fairfield, All Saints' 

Murfreesboro, St. Barnabas' 

Roxobel. St. Mark's 

Sladesville, St. John's ... 
Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' . 
Sunbury, St. Peter's ..... 
Swan Quarter. Calvary . . . 
Winterville, St. Luke's . . . 
Yeatesville, St. Matthew's 

Unorganized Missions. 

Avoca, Holy Innocents' . 
Camden, St. Joseph's 



Total $ 9,835.04 



OF COLORED CHURCH WORKERS 



Unorganized Missions. 

Aurora, St. Jude's 

Beaufort, St. Clement's 

Greenville, St. Andrew's 

Haddock's Cr&s* Roads, St. Stephen's 

Roper. St. Ann's 

Wilmington, "Brooklyn" Mission . . 
Wrightsville, St. Augustine's 



Total 



Paid to 
Sept. 23 

10500 

5.04 

20.00 

11.50 

6.07 

50.00 

5.75 



5.00 



8.37 

62.68 



* 21,159.30 


$10,590.3C> 


225.00 


94.17 


100.00 


36.2': 


150.00 


84.84 


55.00 




10.00 




30.00 


15.00 


.99. 08 


55.55 


10.00 




100.00 




42.00 


25.67 


20.00 


10 75 


125.00 


115.00 


20.00 


20.00 


80.00 


?2 60 


10.00 


5.00 



$ 4,738.81 



Grand Total 



43.00 




5.00 


40.00 




23.30 


30.00 






30.00 




5.50 


26.00 






20.00 




10.00 


20.00 




10.00 


* 1,354.15 


$ 


597.81 


$ 32,348.49 


$15 


,926.98 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD 



VIRGINIA EPISCOPAL 
SCHOOL 

LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 



1 
| 
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I 



Prepares boys for College and University. Splen- \ 

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and beautiful location in the mountains of Virginia, i 

Charges exceptionally low. For catalog apply to: j 

REV. OSCAR deWOLF RANDOLPH I 

RECTOR I 



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FOR SERVICE 
Good -Year Tires Exide Batteries 

Quaker State Lubrication 

Telephone 827 12th and Market Sts 

Wilmington, N. C. 



•4,„ „„ „„ ,,„ „. 

t 



* 



Form of Bequest | 

— 1 

I 

I hereby, give, devise, and bequeath to I 

I 
the Trustees of the Protestant Episcopal | 

Church in the Diocese of East Carolina | 



i 



to be held by them in trust for ' 

I 



I 
f 



ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Conducted for Negro Youth under the auspices of the Epis- I. 

copal Church. f 

A four year accredited College Course is offered, leading to J 

degrees of B. A. and B. S., including Pre-Medical work and , 

Teacher Training for State High School Teachers' certificates. [ 

A College Preparatory Department, Training School for Nurses I 

and School for Religious and Social Workers are connected with I 

the College. j 

Thorough training, healthy environment. Christian influences. s 

For Catalog and information write — \ 

The Registrar j 

ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE, RALEIGH, N. C. | 



FOR ALL COLDS USE 
nn\f VAPOR SALVE 25c 




[ 



NOSE AND THROAT DROPS 35c 



MANUFACTURED BY 

FLURENE CHEMICALS, Ltd. 

Washington, North Carolina 



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4-PLY CROCHET YARN 
50c PER POUND 

WRITE US FOR SPECIAL CLUB 
RATES IN 50-LB. LOTS 

TOLAR, HART & HOLT MILLS 

FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



Meares Insurance Agency 

108 Princess Street 
Wilmington, N. C. 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND j 
JUNIOR COLLEGE j 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

An Episcopal School for girls— Have your daughter j 
receive her education in a church school. 

Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, B. S., 

Principal ! 

Saint Mary's offers 4 years' High School and 2 ' 

years' College work all fully accredited by the South- f 

ern Association. Also courses in Music, Art, Ex- ! : 

pression, Home Economics, and Business. = 

20-Acre Campus. Gym and Field Sports. Tennis, j 

Indoor Tiled Swimming Pool. Horseback i 

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A. W. TUCKER, Business Manager. ! 



-+ *- 



2-V 



■<t>.^> 



Jan. 36 

library, U. II. c. 
I Chapel Hill, S. C , 



-• U ft. i 



VOLUME XLIX 



tSSlfltl 

Irralt 







NUMBER 10 




>**. 



,&&? 



v4.\ 



1Lft-^tra-tl)at-l)tarft{)$aycomflKeu22:i7 q 



PROGRAM^NUMBER 

No self-centred, self-serving life en- 
sures satisfaction. In the very nature 
of things it is imperative that we look 
beyond our personal interests, and take 
thought for the welfare of our neigh- 
bor Unselfishness is a fact in human 
nature and life, as truly as the self-re- 
garding instincts are. 

W. h. WATKINSON 

OCTOBER, 1935 




o 



<y 



r\ 



O 



\J 



THE MISSION HERALD 



MEETING OF WILMINGTON CONVOCATION 

ST. MARY'S PARISH, KINSTON 

NOVEMBER 6, 1935 



PROGRAM 

10:00 A. M. — Holy Communion. 

Celebrant, the Rt. Rev. Thomas C. 
Darst, D. D., assisted by the Rev. E. W. 
Halleck, B. D., and the Rev. B. F. 
Huske, D. D. 

At this service the Convocational offer- 
ing will be presented. 
Business Sessions of the Woman's Aux- 
iliary. 

10:45 A.M.— Hymn 493— "The Church's One Foun- 
dation. ' ' 

Opening prayers — Rev. E. W. Halleck. 
Greetings — Miss Steva Dodson. 
Response — Mrs. David Murchison. 
Roll Call. 

Minutes — Mrs. S. P. Adams. 
Report of Treasurer — Rev. Geo. S. 
Gresham. 

Appointment of Committees. 
President's Message — Mrs. J. Q. Beck- 
with. 

Report from each District Chairman: 
District No. 1 — Mrs. Frank Challen, 

New Bern, N. 0. 
District No. 2 — Mrs. Mamye Whitfield, 

Kinston, N. C. 
District No. 10 — Mrs. F. B. Johnson, 
District No. 11— Mrs. S. L Smith, 
Whiteville, N. C. 

District No. 12 — Mrs. Wm. G. James, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

Noon Day Prayer and Address — For- 
ward Movement, Rt. Rev. Thomas C. 
Darst, D. D. 

Hymn 586— "Lord Speak to Me." 
Student Work — Miss Elizabeth An- 
drews. 

Rural Work — Rev. J. L. Malone. 
Solo— Oh Rest in the Lord (Elijah) 
Mendelsohn. 

The Woman's Auxiliary in the Life of 
the Young People's Service League — 
Miss Mary Graham. 
Talk on the Philippines — Miss Eliza- 
beth Griffin. 
Announcements, 
to 2 :00 P. M.— Luncheon. 

Afternoon Session 
Hvmn 432 — "Love Divine, All Love 



Excelling." 

Prayers and Address — Rev. B. F. 

Huske, D. D. 

Address by Diocesan President — Mrs. 

Fred L. Outland. 

Christian Social Service — Mrs. John E. 

F. Hicks. 

Supply Work — Mrs. John H. Bonner. 

United Thank Offering — Miss Caroline 

K. Myers. 

Church Publicity— Mrs. W. A. Harden. 

Addresses — Rev. Alexander Miller and 

Rev. W. R. Noe. 
Church Periodical Club — Mrs. Sidney 
Ward. 

Report of Committees. 
New Business. 

Hymn— "O Saviour Let Me Walk With 
Thee." 
Benediction. 
Adjournment. 



NEWS FROM WINDSOR FIELD 



A union service was held by the Methodist, Epis- 
copal and Baptist congregations of Windsor in the 
Cashie Baptist Church in Windsor, N. 0., on Sunday 
evening, September 29th. It was a "Get Acquaint- 
ed" service in courtesy to the Rev. W. M. Latta, new 
Rector of St. Thomas. The Rev. E. C. Kalb, pastor 
of the Baptist Church, presided. The Rev. T. W. 
Lee, pastor of the Methodist Church, led in prayer 
and Mr. Latta preached. Music was furnished by 
the combined choirs. After the service the new Rec- 
tor and Mrs. Latta Avere greeted cordially and ex- 
tended best wishes by everyone present. 



Mrs. Francis Winston's Circle of the Woman's 
Auxiliary of St. Thomas' Church, Windsor, sponsor- 
ed a play, "Oh Professor" at the High School on the 
evenings of October 3rd and 4th, at which a neat 
sum was realized for new furnishings at the Rectory. 
Mr. Stephen Kenney, young Windsor attorney took 
the part of the "Professor." 



1 :00 



The Auxiliaries of Roxobel and Woodville gave a 
beautifully appointed tea and shower at the home of 
Mr. Stephen Norfleet in Kelford on the afternoon of 
October 4th, in honor of Mrs. W. M. Latta, bride of 
the new Rector of Grace and St. Mark's. About 
seventy-five were present. Mrs. Norfleet 's lovely 
home was decorated with dahlias and roses. Mrs. 
Latta was presented with many lovely and useful 
gifts. — Contributed. 



The Mission Herald 



VOLUME XLIX 



W]LMINGTON ; N. C, OCTOBER, 1935 



NUMBER 10 



BISHOP'S MESSAGE 



The outstanding note that is being sounded by 
the leaders in oar Church's life today is the neces- 
sity for a more real and compelling sense of PART- 
NERSHIP, and it is with that great comprehensive 
word in mind that I call my beloved people of East 
Carolina to vigorous, joyful cooperation in carrying 
forward our dear Lord's work during the coming 
year. 

When Jesus walked by the Sea of Galilee and trod 
the hills of Judea nearly two thousand years ago, it 
was in the. company of men whom He had called 
to be sharers with Him in a great enterprise, part- 
ners with Him in the promotion of the Kingdom of 
God. And the same call comes today for the task 
is not yet completed, the Kingdom of God on earth 
is still an unfulfilled objective. 

We must never forget, however, that we have 
come a long way since our Lord called those first 
disciples into partnership with Him We have wit- 
nessed the rise and growth of that partnership that 
we call the Church of God. We have seen the com- 
panions of Jesus carrying the Gospel of His love 
and power into every corner of the earth. We have 
seen the power of a great unified body encircle 
and illumine a world. We are walking today as 
free men and women in a world of clean standards 
and glowing ideals, because of those men and women 
in every age who worked with Christ in His far 
reaching plans for the redemption of all mankind. 

Here in East Carolina we have our Sunday 
Schools, our missions, our churches, our Christian 
civilization because our fathers and mothers, with 
tuiconquerable faith and high courage and self- 
sacrificing sendee, labored with Christ in planting 
His Church and spreading His gospel in this land 
in which we dwell in security and in peace. 

We must carry on the partnership or prove un- 
worthy of our fathers and recreant to our trust as 
sharers in a great cause. 

There are waste places in our diocese and Christ, 
calls us to go with Him to those neglected fields 
where His blathers and ours wait for our coming. 
There are dark and dreadful regions in our own 
favored land where Christ would have us carry 
light and power and love. There are millions be- 
yond the seas who are waiting for some one to tell 
them of Him Who is the Way to peace and power 



and fellowship with one another and with God, and 
unless you and I are willing to be fellow-laborers 
with Him, they will never know the glory of their 
heritage and we, with empty hands, will have no- 
thing to show that we have lived. 

Very few of us can ever hope to walk with Him 
and share in actual companionship His blessed work 
in the neglected sections of our diocese, or go with 
Him on lonely journeys to those in far off countries 
who wait through the long night for the dawn of the 
new day, BUT there is not a man or woman or 
child in East Carolina who can not have the blessed 
privilege of close and intimate partnership with Him 
through sharing with others those material things 
which, in His loving generosity, He has placed in 
our keeping. If we really believe the great state- 
ment "All things come, of Thee, Lord" surely 
our sense of fairness and justice and common hon- 
esty will cause us to say with our lips and with our 
means "And of Thine own have we given Thee." 

Cod grant that in such a spirit we may respond 
to the Every-Member Canvass next month. That 
it may not be to us an annual and somewhat dis- 
agreeable incident in our Church's life, but an op- 
portunity to show ottr loyalty to our great partner, 
Jesus, a demonstration of our oneness with His plan, 
a concrete example of our fellowship in His gospel, a 
challenge to our generation that we will never cease 
to give of ourseives and our means until that King- 
dom for which we have prayed so long really comes 
into the hearts of men and dominates with compel- 
ling beauty and power the nations of the world. 

As partners with Christ, as sharers in His plans 
for diocese and country and world, we will come up 
from the low levels of self-interest and depression 
and fear, and walk with Him in joyful sacrificial 
service along the road that leads to victory and to 
peace. 

Faithfully and affectionately, 

Your friend and Bishop, 

THOMAS C. DARST 



NEW CHURCH PERIODICAL CLUB 
SECRETARY 



Mrs. Anna Rose Outland, President of the Wom- 
an's Auxiliary of the Diocese, has announced that 
Mrs. Sidney Ward, Plymouth N. C, has accepted the 
appointment as C. P. C Secretary. This office was 
formerly held by Miss Jessie Peace. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



Onward Christian Soldiers! 

(At the Clergy Conference held at Camp L«ach September 24th and 25th, 1935, the Field Depart- 
ment of the Executive Council presented a program for the Diocese covering the period of the next three 
years. At the request of the Conference, the Chairman of the Field Department, at the close of the 
meeting, presented the following resolution which expressed the mind of the Conference. It was unani- 
mously adopted. It meets the immediate need and marks the initial step in a comprehensive program 
for the Diocese designed to contribute to the Forward Movement of the Church.) 



RESOLVED; that we, the Clergy of the Diocese of East Carolina in conference with our Bishop, 
approve, and accept as a goal of endeavor for a three-year period, beginning with the fall work of 
1935, the following objectives which, under the guidance of the Holy Spirit shall result in calling into 
closer fellowship and fuller participation in the work of the Church, every member of the same, so that 
the Church may witness with strength and beauty and power in bringing others to the saving and trans- 
forming power of Jesus Christ. 

1. That we begin in the Jerusalem of our own lives to realize with deeper meaning the purpose of our 
high calling, and appropriate with new desire and enthusiasm the promised power that alone will enable 
us to present Jesus Christ to a needy world. 

2. That we make a most earefitl study and survey of the condition, and of the opportunities within 
our own parishes, the burden of our prayers and efforts, and of our people, to be directed toward the 
unbaptized, the unconfirmed and those who are not enjoying the fellowship and joy of full partici- 
pation in the worship and service of their Lord. 

3. That we recognize and present to our people, the imperative need of the Church at this time and 
the importance of the preparation for, and the conduct of the Every-Member Canvass to be conducted 
during the period beginning November 10th, and ending November 24th. 

4. That in an effort to inform and awaken our people, and secure the financial results that are es- 
sential to the work of the Church at this time, we accept as a minimum of preparation: 

(a) That we begin with Loyalty Sunday, October 6th, to preach such sermons as are in keeping with 
the need and the purpose of preparation for this Canvass. 

(b) To prepare a financial program including the apportionment as recommended by the Diocesan 
Convention; a financial program in keeping with the needs of the Church and worthy of the financial 
ability and the devotion of our people to the cause of Christ and His Church. 

(c) To organize and prepare our canvassers for their work. 

(d) To determine that we shall not bring this canvass to an end until every baptized member of the 
Church shall have been given complete information and opportunity for expression to the end that 
the financial program of the Church be realized and the best possible results be accomplished, i.e. To 
conduct this year a most thorough and complete Every-Member Canvass. 

(e) That the Canvass this year be a part of this three-year plan. 

II 

That in the second year of this three-year period, we present to our people, as is customary, a 
financial program, but direct our efforts towards the enlistment and support of such members who 
have not accepted and fulfilled their obligations to the Church and its work. The work of this second 
year to be inaugurated by a Diocesan wide Evangelistic effort for souls. 

in 

That we continue in the third year our studied efforts to bring the whole church into closer union 
with the purpose and task of the Church, using such agencies and plans as will contribute to the ac- 
complishment of this purpose and task. 



OCTOBER, 1935 



G-race Church, Whitbvireb 



Away back in the days when the town of White- 
ville gave little promise of growth or prosperity, 
the Rev. Thomas P. Noe, who was then Rector of the 
Church of the Good Shepherd, Wilmington, saw 
or thought he saw, possibilities*, not only of growth 
of the town itself, but also of the Church, and this 
in spite of the fact that Whiteville then had only 
one member of the Church living there. At any 
rate Mr. Noe began to come at occasional intervals 
to Whiteville to hold Services, and succeeded in 
gaining the interest of a few people, who became 
devoted to the Church as long as they lived. 

Then in the year 1911 Mr. Noe laid the matter of 
purchasing a lot in Whiteville before Bishop Strange 
who agreed with him that there were possibilities 
in the little city, and so the Bishop was able to buy 
a lot in Whiteville, where the future Church was 
to be built. It is one of the rich traditions of the 
older people of Whiteville, the consecration of this 
lot, with Bishop Strange in his robes holding the 
Service of Consecration, and the prayers he uttereo. 
on that occasion are still green in the memories of 
those who attended the Service. 

After the Service of Consecration the Bishop told 
the congregation that it was his wish that the 
Church to be built on the lot was to be called Grace 
Church, which was done, and it has ever remained 
Grace Church, not only in accordance with the 
Bishop's wishes but also as a kind of loving Me- 
morial to him for his kindness and interest. 

The first member of the Church was Mrs. Seth 
Smith, who was a Communicant of St. Thomas' 
Church, Atkinson and who transferred her member- 
ship to Grace Church because she believed with the 
Bishop and Mr. Noe that Grace Church would some 
day give a good account of itself in the Diocese. 

Doctor John and Mrs. McNeill and son George 
became greatly interested in the little Church but 
they opposed for a time the building of a Church 
as there were no members but Mrs. Smith. Mrs. 
McNeill became a member of the Church and they 
retained their loving interest in the .'Church all 
through the years. 

Before the Church was built the services were 
held in the school house but Mr. Noe found such 
an arrangement unsatisactory and it was this that 
determined Mrs. Smith to seek funds for the erection 
of the Church building. Bishop Strange when in- 
formed of the project, donated four hundred dollars 
towards the building. Mrs. Seth Smith went our 
and interested the citizens of the town and from 
them received four hundred and six dollars and 



fifty cents and the American Church Building Fund 
Commission granted three hundred dollars. 

It might be of interest to the people of the diocese 
as well as to the people of Whiteville to know who 
ihese £>ood people were who helped by their con- 
tributions as many of them have long since gone to 
their reward and those who remain will be glad to 
have the record of the work which they helped to 
do and to know, as many of them will know by this 
record for the first time the names of all those who 
by their contributions made Grace Church, White- 
ville possible. 

The names of the subscribers are as follows: Mrs. 
Seth Smith, W. T. Aycock, G. R. McNeill, S. E 
Memory, H. L. Lyon, PoAvell and Powell, Oscar High. 
J. B. Schulken, D. M. Thompson, W. E, McDaniei, 
Walter Powell, R. C. Powell, Dr. L. J. Meredith. 
M. T. Moyer, E. F. Powell, J. G. Thompson, Dr. W. 
H. dwell, J. D. Maultsby, Miss Lida J. Russell, Mrs. 
Isaac Jackson, L. L. Hinson, H. H. Corbett, J. F. 
Barkley, John Carter. H. F. Schulken, W. R. Mc- 
Racken, E. S. Lewis, J. T. Melvenzie, J. L. Powell. 
W. H. Phillipps, F. L. Lord, Mrs. H. Formy Duval], 
Dr. R. B. Whittakcr, J. R. Curganus, W. M. Spivey, 
Mrs. Sally McDaniei, A. W. Baldwin, Miss Aileen 
Smith, L. V. Grady, Si-., E. M. Dewey, Donald Mc- 
Rackin, E. M. Toon, F. B. Gait, Mrs. R, C. Carson. 

When the Church was built Mrs. Seth Smith pro- 
vided some of the furniture including an organ and 
heater. Mr. F. B. Gait gave the Altar Cross and 
Mrs. Walter Lynch, now of Goldsboro, gave the 
Altar Candlesticks. 

The Rev. Thomas P. Noe continued to hold the 
services and presented several candidates for confir- 
mation. Mrs. W. E. McDaniei being the first person 
confirmed in the new Church on the same day that 
it was dedicated by Bishop Darst, Jnly 4th, 1915. 

Since that time the Woman's Auxiliary of the 
Church has raised enough money to build a Sunday 
School room with our own beloved Bishop Darst 
giving towards it with his usual generosity, and Mr. 
F. B. Gait giving the floor for the buildng. It would 
take too long to tell in this article of the love and 
devoted Service of the women of the Church as well 
as the most enthusiastic cooperation of all the men, 
but the article would not be complete if the name 
of Mr. Bion Sears was omitted as Mr. Sears has been 
most helpful in beautifying the grounds and land- 
scape generally around the Church by donations of 
trees and shrubs and flowers which make the build- 
ings most attractive. 

Now as far as the records of the Church show 



THE MISSION HERALD 



there has been a steady growth, but Whiteville like 
all small towns has sent its Communicants into the 
cities to help fill the pews of the city Churches at the 
expense of its own prosperity, but it has continued 
to fulfill its function and it is not too much to say 
that Grace Church has been a leader in the religious 
and spiritual lite of the community because in ac- 
cordance with the custom as well as the canons of the 
Church it has confined itself to the preaching and 
teaching of the Gospel of our Lord and Saviour and 
has not departed from the ways or from the practice 
of the Fathers to teach strange and fantastic doc- 
trines which seem to be so prevalent in many cases 
today. 

The Church School is one of the best attended as 
well as one of the best equipped and best managed 
with a splendid corps of well informed teachers 
most of whom are teachers in the day schools and are 
devoted and consecrated men arid women who take 
their work earnestly and are very conscious of the 
responsibility which rests upon them in moulding the 
spiritual life of the young and so they come to the 
Church school well prepared and with a prayerful 
spirit which will bring results and bear fruit in well 
balanced and developed lives to be real witness bear- 
ers when we of the older generations have surrender- 
ed the torch to their young and eager hands. 

The complete list of all those who have ministered 
in Grace Church is not available at the present mo- 
ment but the record shows that the following Min- 
isters were in charge of the congregation at some 
time during the years of Grace Church's life. 

The Rev. T. P. Noe, W. R. Noe, Alexander Miller, 
J. 15. W. Cooke, Sidney Matthews, H. J. Lewis, L. 
M. Fenwick, with Mr. Fred Turner and several Lay 
readers serving from time to time in the absence of 
regular Ministers. The present Minister in charge 
is the Rev. A. H. Marshall who has been in charge 
of the work since February 1st of this present year. 

The Vestry of the Church at the present time is 
composed of Mr. W. W. Schulken, Sr., W. L\ N. 
Mitchell, S. W. Guy Culpepper, secretary, M. A. Hill, 
Treas. ; Bion Sears, Porchay Smith and J. W. Robert- 
son, and these men are doing their work enthusiastic- 
ally and efficiently with the greatest amount of peace 
and harmony and have the whole-hearted coopera- 
tion of every member of the congregation and giving 
the heartiest cooperation to the Rector. 

Because of the toll which the cities have demanded 
upon the Churches in the small towns, Grace Church 
has had to struggle with small congregations and 
small means, but the people of the city are interested 
in the Church as is evidenced by the unusually large 
number of non members who attend the Services 
every Sunday, and their reactions to the Services are 



shown by the fact that at the Bishop's Visitation re- 
cently he Confirmed twelve persons, ten of whom 
were adults, while the other two were young women. 
This class of twelve persons represents an addition 
of fifty per cent to the list of Communicants in the 
Parish as before that, Grace 'Church had twenty-four 
Communicants but now has thirty-six. 

It might be of interest to point out that the pledges 
by the men of the Parish are unusually large as the 
average pledge of the men amounts to a dollar and 
a quarter a week or five dollars a month. This is 
an indication of the enthusiasm of the men of the 
Parish, and the women are equally enthusiastic, giv- 
ing of their means in proportion and also giving of 
their love and time and energy and devotion which 
means a great deal and is the real reason for the 
measure of spiritual well being in the Church as 
well as its prosperity and material success 

The average atendance at the Morning Service, 
which is held every Sunday Morning at eleven 
o'clock, is thirty-four or 98% of the entire congrega- 
tion with 100% of male subscribers and this average 
covers a period of eight months^ which shows that 
many people are attracted to the services who are 
not members, but who find in the Church and her 
teachings and ways and services a source of strength 
and spiritual comfort which is not excelled by that 
of any other Church or denomination!, and Grace 
Church is going on, strong in the strength which 
God Supplies, and will continue to go on and do its 
work, glad in the consciousness of its origin and its 
mission and its destiny, glad to do His will Who 
founded it and sent it into the world to brighten and 
bless the lives of the men and women who come in 
contact Avith it and thus with its Lord and Saviour 
Jesus Christ. A. H. M. 



MEMBER OF ST. STEPHEN'S CHURCH AGAIN 

DIRECTOR OF THE COMMUNITY 

CHEST DRIVE 



Mr. James N. Smith, a member of the vestry of 
St. Stephen's Church, Goldsboro, has been chosen 
to direct the Community Chest Drive. Mr. Smith is 
a young progressive lawyer and has taken hold of 
the job with a lot of enthusiasm and everyone looks 
for the drive under his management to go "over the 
top". Last year the Rector of St. Stephen's Church 
directed the "Drive". 



OCTOBER, 1935 



What To Do and When To Do It I 



AN OUTLINE OP THAT PART OF THE DIOCESAN PROGRAM WHICH DEALS WITH THE 
PREPARATION AND CONDUCT OF THE E VERY-MEMBER CANVASS. 



1. Beginning with Loyalty Sunday, October 6th, 
the clergy of the Diocese are committed to the 
preaching of such sermons as will present to their 
people the Program and the needs of the Church 
at this time, to the end that our people will know 
the task and be filled with 1he desire to share in it. 

2. Visit every family and individual and make i 
special effort to reach the uxi baptized, the uncon- 
firmed, and the ones who have not been active in 
the worship and work of the Church. 

3. Have prepared and adopted by the Vestry, a 
financial program designed to meet the financial 
requirements of the mission or parish, the Diocese 
and the General Church. This program to include 
the minimum salary for clergy and the apportion- 
ment as recommended by the Diocesan Convention. 

4. Arrange such conferences and personal visits as 
will provide that the program of the Church and 
its financial requirements be presented to every 
baptized member of the Church. 

5. Establish a definite period for the conduct oil 
the Every-Member Canvass-^thc time appointed by 
the General Church being the period beginning No- 
vember 10th and ending November 24th. 

6. Select the best person available in the Mission or 
Parish as Chairman of the Parish Program for the 



conduct of the Every-Member Canvass. 

7. Do not .pist appoint members to this important 
committee for the conduct of the Every-Memb-;r 
Canvass. First select, then inform them as to what 
is required. If they are willing to do the work and 
see it through, appoint them. 

8. Prepare a complete list of all who are to be 
canvassed. 

9. Have as many meetings of the members of the 
Canvassing Committee as needed for the proper 
preparation for this work. Do not leave to the last 
minute the division of the families and the individ- 
uals to be visited by the canvassers. Give much 
study to these divisions and to the canvassers who 
are to visit them. Arrange for the canvassers to 
attend such meetings or group conferences provided 
for the families and individuals he is to canvass. 

10. Do not canvass any person who has not been 
informed, and do not use an uninformed canvassei'. 

11. Establish in the parish the feeling and the 
atmosphere that we are engaged in a work of tre- 
mendous importance — a work that must suffer if 
any one member fails to participate and share in it. 

12. Keep in mind we are committed to a thorough 
and complete Every-Member Canvass and we are 
not going to quit until the work is completed. 



TABLET ERECTED IN MEMORY OF REV. 
THEODORE PARTRICK, JR. 



A tablet has been placed on the East Wall of the 
Church of the Good Shepherd, Raleigh, N. C, with 
the following inscription: 

IN MEMORY OF 

THE REVEREND 

THEODORE PARTRICK, JUNIOR 

Seventh Rector of This Parish •* 

Born June 2, 1889 

Died February 4, 1935 

He Went About Doing Good. 

This tablet is the gift of the members of the Good 
Shepherd congregation whom Mr. Partrick served so 
faithfully from November 1, 1930 to Februaiw 4 
1935. 

On All Saints' Day, November 1st, an appropriate 
service will be held at which time this tablet will be 
presented, received and dedicated. 



RESOLUTION OF THE STANDING COMMITTEE 
OF THE SOCIETY FOR THE PROPA- 
GATION OF THE GOSPEL 



GIFT TO THE SOCIETY FROM THE CHURCH 
IN AMERICA : Agreed to record receipt of a Gavel 
from the Diocese of East Carolina, presented in per- 
son by the Bishop of East Carolina and inscribed as 
follows : 

Presented to 
The Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 
by the Roanoke Colony Memorial Association 
commemorating 
the birth and baptism of Virginia Dare 
Thirst born of English parents in North America 
Fort Raleigh, Roanoke Island, N. C. 
August 18th and 20th, 1587 
AGREED that the Bishop of East Carolina be 
thanked for his personal visit, and the kind messages 
he brought for the Society ; and that the very inter- 
esting gift of a gavel be accepted Avith appreciation 
and gratitude, and be brought into use in the conduct 
of the Society's business. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



Christian Stewardship ! 



BY THE FORWARD MOVEMENT COMMISSION. 



WHAT IS the purpose of "making money"? 
Naturally, self-support and the support of those 
dependent upon us. But it is something more than 
that. "That so laboring ye ought to support the 
weak." "We then that are strong ought to bear 
the burdens of the weak." This does not mean 
simply the physically weak, but also all who are 
handicapped by ignorance, superstition, and fear. 
The Christian should be more concerned with giving 
than getting. The question is not how much do I 
give, but how much do I keep for myself? Carey, 
the great missionary to India, in the days when he 
repaired shoes for a living, said, "my business is to 
preach the Gospel; I cobble shoes to pay expenses." 
Many unable to go as missionaries have lived to 
support those who could go. 



SYSTEMATIC, regular giving was early taught 
in the Christian Church. It is as much a part of 
a Christian's religion as his prayers, and the individ- 
ual must be taught to give just as he must be taught 
to pray. He gives, not merely when he feels like it 
nor when moved by a special appeal, but he budgets 
his income, putting aside a definite portion of it for 
the support of the Church and the spread of the 
Gospel. Anything left over at the end of the month 
or the year from the portion pledged to God is car- 
ried over as a debit, as money still owed to God. 



"G 



OD LOVETH a cheerful giver." This means 
that along with what we give goes the glad- 
ness of a warm heart and a sure intent. The world 
may not be able to gauge the ardor of our prayers 
nor may it care to inquire closely how much Ave give. 
But whether we churchmen give gladly, or whether 
our contributions are raised "like pulling teeth" is 
soon noised abroad in the whole community. 



SOMETIMES we consider money to be an un- 
spiritual thing and that we ought not to talk 
about it in connection with religion. Our Lord did 
not hesitate to speak about it and bid us make 
friends with money which can open "everlasting 
habitations". He noticed the poor widow's gift and 



He commended it. Money is a sacrament. It ex- 
presses spiritual qualities and it is used for spiritual 
results. It may be invested in human lives and 
bring far greater returns in happiness to mankind 
than if used selfishly for ourselves or our own 
narrow circle. 



HERE I AM in God's world. I need things 
which other people can bring to me and which I 
cannot obtain by myself. I have things, spiritual 
and physical, which others need and which must be 
brought to them by us who have. We are mutually 
deprndent upon each other. I want to discharge, 
my stewardship. I will pray that I may know how, 
and grow in this grace and in the likeness of ray 
Saviour Christ, "who though He was rich, for our 
sakes became poor that we through His poverty 
might be enriched." 



THIS IS definite teaching about stewardship. 
The main emphasis is that each one must give an 
account. What I have, whether it is money, talent, 
influence, position, physical strength — all comes 
from God. He has entrusted me with its use. Every 
responsibility must some day be accounted for. Our 
faithfulness as stewards of our present possessions 
will determine our future. But future rewards or 
punishments are not the motive. It is the love of 
Christ that constraineth us. 



((jN THE Prayer Book the true nature of alms- 
1 giving is taught by the place assigned to it in 
the Holy Communion — the spirit of giving as a sacri- 
fice to God. If such sacrifices are well pleasing to 
Him, worthy methods must be used to foster them, 
and unworthy ones refused. It would be hard, for 
example to fit raffles, whist-drives, and dancing as a 
money-raising means of grace into the Acts of the 
Apostles. Sacrificial giving is apt to droop and 
wither in these surroundings. 'Jesus sat over 
against the Treasury and beheld how the people 
cast money into the Treasury.' HE 'beheld 
HOW.' "— R. C. JOYNT 



OCTOBER, 1935 



The Message of the National Council 

To the Church ! 



THE CHURCH'S life since General Convention, has been marked by an increase in interest and 
support. It is plain that the faith and spirit of the Church are responding to the program 
of inspiration and education inaugurated by the Commission on the Forward Movement. 

Reports submitted to National Council indicate that as yet the improvement has not proceeded 
far enough to provide for the degree of restoration in parochial, diocesan, and general Church work 
which the General Convention set as a goal for this triennium. 

It was clearly the intention of General Convention that the Church should regard the $2,700,000 
annual budget as the base for a program of restoration; similarly that it should regard the Emergency 
Schedule of $2,313,118 as a "stand still" program, and anything less as a budget of disaster. 

Even the minimum program called for an increase of twenty-five per cent over the actual contri- 
butions from the dioceses for the Church's general work in 1934. Some dioceses reached or exceeded 
this mark, yet the sum of the expectations eventually reported an advance of only nine per cent. 
Happily, the amount needed to insure the advance of twenty-five per cent was secured from indi- 
vidual gifts. Thus the "stand still" program was anchored, and the payments on Expectations to 
September 1st would indicate that there will be no deficit in the administration of the General Church 
program in 1935. 

The Council has given preliminary consideration to the operating budget for 1936. The officers 
of the Council have complied with the instructions of General Convention to secure from each diocese 
the acceptance of an objective for 1936 based upon shown capacity to pay and a willingness to accept 
a generous share of $2,700,000. 

The results of this inquiry are frankly disappointing, if not discouraging. In spite of the improve- 
ment in the spirit and faith of the Church and in spite of the fact that the present year has brought a 
marked recovery in general conditions throughout the United States which is signalized by increased 
spending in all directions, the sum of the objectives which the dioceses have been willing to accept 
is still below the amount needed to provide for the "standstill" program. 

We are confident that the results of the annual Canvass will exceed the amounts represented by 
the objectives tentatively assumed and that the Church can and will by i+s gifts for missions in 1936 
advance toward the goal of restoration. The Council, however, feels that the Church should know 
that the estimated sum to be realized from these objectives is at present. $200,000 less than the amount 
needed to continue the present operating budget and $600,000 less than the amount needed to provide 
for the $2,700,000 Budget of Restoration. 

The Council proposes to each diocese and parish as the guide for its corporate effort and to every 
Church member as a ride of his personal endeavor this threefold program : 

I. In terms of CHRISTIAN DISCIPLESHIP 

The adoption and the realization of the aims of the Forward Movement; recognizing that the bottom 
of all the weakness in our organized Christianity is the feebleness of our apprehension of Christ the 
Saviour and the limitations of our acceptance of the demands He makes upon us. 

II. In terms of CHRISTIAN STEWARDSHIP 
The application and the prosecution of the annual Every Member Canvass, not as a mere financial 

campaign but as an annual event in a sustained program of education in Christian living and Christ- 
ian missions. 

III. In terms of CHRISTIAN PARTNERSHIP 

A resolution to share whatever increase of life and wealth the new clay brings. The sincere practice 
of this simple rule by individuals, parishes, and dioceses would work a miracle for us and do as much 
as anything to banish all necessity for quotas and apportionments and lead us into the joy and 
satisfaction of a great partnership of recovery. 



.10 



THE MISSION HERALD 



The Mission Herald 

ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 
Published Monthly except July and August at 

507 Southern Building 
WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF ~ 

Editor 

REV. WALTER R. NOE 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 

RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 

MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 
Advertising rates furnished on application. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to receive 
their papers, should promptly notify the Business Man- 
ager, giving when necessary, both the old and new ad- 
dress. 



THE FALL CAMPAIGN 



Again we come to that period of the year when we 
must think of the annual every member canvass. We 
live in a practical world, where money is needed as a 
medium of exchange, and the Church must have this 
medium also. The only efficient and proper way yet 
devised to obtain the proper sums needed and the 
proper interest from the giver has been the method 
of the every member canvass. 

Unfortunately, there is a feeling that has grown 
in the Church that this is a dreary task. In spite 
of good secretaries and well-written literature, many 
parishes are looking for an easier way to conduct 
this necessary piece of work, and we suspect that it 
is in looking for some other way and neglectng the 
right method that weariness has come instead of joy. 
For those rare parishes that really do the work cor- 
rectly have found that the campaign is the climax 
of the whole program and that their people with bet- 
ter knowledge and finer interest have come from the 
campaign with renewed strength and better attitudes 
towards the Church and the Church's work. 

We say it is a campaign for money, and yet it real- 
ly is not that at all. It is primarily a campaign for 
people. If they have translated part of their lives 
in terms of money, we receive the lives in that way. 
But if it were only the money we were interested in, 
there would be quicker and easier ways. Lotteries 
have been resorted to in some countries for carrying 
on religious work and have proved a simple method. 
But we reject such things as actually inconsistent 



with Christianity and if we reject mere money rais- 
ing, we must learn that the real object of our every 
member canvass is educational and our work must be 
guided so that every member learns about the Church 
and learns that he is a part of it. 

Mail campaigns and other temporary devices do 
not carry this educational value. Nothing can take 
the place of devoted and hard-working Christian 
men and women paying a personal call in a friendly 
way. 

Modern budgets are the result of studying needs, 
and the Church's budget is built up the same way. 
These needs must be interpreted to our people, and 
begging letters run off on mimeographs do not take 
the place of the personal call. When pt v oper!y con- 
ducted there is always witnessed a new and lively 
interest and the workers themselves find a joy in 
service. 

Let us go forward with real and tried methods 
and, following the suggestions of our experts who 
have studied the problem for years, have a real 
Every Member Canvass of the whole Church that 
will restore our missionary work to its proper place 
and leave in the local parish an enthusiastic and 
educated laity. — Editorial Southern Churchman. 



THE PROVINCIAL WORK 



The work of the Provinces is largely promotional. 

The work of our oavu Province, the Province of 
Sewanee, with one exception, the missionary work 
for deaf-mutes, is promotional. 

For a number years our Provincial Department 
of Religious Education has been helpful to the Dio- 
ceses by conducting institutes, conferences and 
camps, and by furnishing programs for Church 
Schools and Young People's Service Leagues. The 
Field Workers of this Department have made many 
contributions to the Avork of the Church in the 
Province and have made it possible for us to have 
an unusually large number -of trained workers. 

The Department of Christian Social Service is in- 
terested in the rural work and has helped us through 
conferences to understand the importance of this 
part of our work. 

The Department of Missions and 'Church Exten- 
sion, in addition to providing a clergyman for work 
among the deaf-mutes, has taken a great deal of in- 
terest in the work for colored people, especially 
those who are being trained in our schools. 

It is our hope that the people of the Diocese of 
East Carolina will become interested in the work of 
the Province and that they will support it in every 
way. 



OCTOBER, 1935 



II 



BISHOP DAEST CHOSEN HEAD OF PROVINCE 



At a meeting of the Synod of the Province of Se- 
wanee, held in Christ Church, Lexington,, Kentucky, 
October 15th to 17th, Bishop Darst, of the Dioccoe 
of East Carolina, was elected President. He will 
succeed the Rt. Rev. Henry J. Mikell of the Diocese 
of Atlanta, who has been President for several years. 

Last year, Mrs. Henry J. MacMillan, of the Dio- 
cese of East Carolina, was elected President of the 
Woman's Auxiliary of the Province. She will serve 
for two more years. 

Fourteen Bishops, one hundred and fifty clergy- 
men and several hundred lay people attended the 
meeting. 

At the joint session of the Synod and the Woman's 
Auxiliary, with Mrs. Henry J. MacMillan, presiding, 
addresses were made by Bishop Mikell and Mrs. 
MacMillan. 

Bishop Hobson, of Southern Ohio, Chairman of the 
Forward Movement Commission, made an address 
at the opening of the Synod and later led a confer- 
ence on the Forward Movement. 

More than 300 persons were in attendance at the 
Provincial dinner at the Phoenix Hotel. Addresses 
were made by Mrs. Henry J. MacMillan, Bishop Mi- 
kell. Miss Elizabeth Matthews of Glendale, Ohio, 
Bishop Barnwell of Georgia, Dr. Warren Kearney. 
New Orleans, and Dr. Benjamin Finney, Sewanee, 
Tenn. 

East Carolina was represented at the meeting of 
the Synod and Auxiliary by Bishop Darst, Rev. B. F 
Huske, D. D., St. Mary's, Kinston; Rev. J. Leon Ma- 
lone. St. John's, Winton; Rev. Walter R. Noe, Ex- 
ecutive Secretary of the Diocese ; Mrs. Henry J. Mac- 
Millan, President of Provincial Auxiliary; Mrs. J. Q. 
Beckwith, Sr.. President of Convocation of Wilming- 
ton, and Mrs. S. P. Adams, who is chairman of the 
Provincial Department of Missions and Church Ex- 
tension. Mrs. W. Cr. Latimer and Mrs. Cameron of 
Wilmington, attended as visitors. 

The next meeting of the Synod will be held in New 
Orleans. 



NOTES FROM FRIENDLY HALL 



Here we are back at school again ! It is hard to 
believe that summer is gone, but it is great to be back 
at Friendly Hall and to have so many new girls with 
us. It was indeed a grand surprise to return and 
find Miss Elizabeth Andrews as our Student Sec- 
retary. We are most fortunate to have her, and 
under her leadership we look forward to an interest- 
ing and happy year. Miss Andrews is originally 
from Greenville but her last two years have been 



spent in the Diocese of Chicago where she has com- 
pleted the course offered for Church workers at Chi- 
cago Church Training School. 

At this point, we wish to extend to Miss Ellen 
Bowen and to the members of St. Mary's Auxiliary 
our deepest gratitude and appreciation for their 
splendid and faithful work at Friendly Hall last year. 
Their help and advice made the year a very success- 
ful one. 

The first meeting of our group was held Saturday 
afternoon, September 28th. Expressions of delight 
were emitted at the attractive appearance of Friend- 
ly Hall which has recently been re-decorated. This 
was made possible through funds left from last year, 
supplemented by a contribution from the Parish for 
which we are sincerely grateful. Plans for a full 
and active year were discussed with eager enthusi- 
asm, and a cup of tea, before our departure was most 
welcome. 

The Student Class met Sunday morning, Septem- 
ber 29th, and the old members were very pleased to 
see so many new girls present. Miss Andrews gave 
a short lecture on "the Divine Origin of the 
Church," and, expressed her desire to give us a lec- 
ture course on the Book of Common Prayer, through 
which she hopes that we may obtain a broader vision 
of the Church, a clear idea of its Teaching, and a 
practical method of applying this knowledge in our 
daily lives as college students. 

The third Sunday in each month will be observed 
in St. Paul' Parish as Corporate Communion Sunday 
for the Students, the 7 :30 service to be followed by 
breakfast in Friendly Hall. We hope, this year, to 
make this service the center of our three-fold — spirit- 
ual, intellectual, and social — life at Friendly Hall. 
MARY TARRY, 

Publicity Chairman, 
Student Branch, W. A. 



MEETING OF EDENTON CONVOCATION 



"The Convocation of Edenton will be held in St. 
Paul's Church, Greenville, Thursday, November the 
7th. The meeting will begin at 10:00 o'clock with 
a celebration of the Holy Communion. A program 
has been prepared that will be interesting and help- 
ful to both men and women. Each parish is asked 
to send a vestryman and an auxiliary member to 
give a report on the most important Aim they would 
like to accomplish before our next Convocation. A 
100% of all the men and women in each parish are 
urged to attend this meeting. As soon as convenient 
please write to Mrs. Eichard Williams or Miss Betsy 
Green how many will be present from your parish." 
MAY CAHOON CARAWAN. 
President of the Convocation of Edenton 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD 



LETTER FROM PRESIDENT OF CONVOCATION LETTER FROM PRESIDENT OF WILMINGTON 
OF EDENTON CONVOCATION 



My dear Auxiliary President : 

At 10:00 o'clock, Thursday, November 7th, the 
Convocation will be held in St. Paul 's Parish, Green- 
ville. Please urge your members to do the following : 
1. Attend 100%. 2. Ask each member to be re- 
sponsible for the presence of at least one man. o. 
Have someone answer to the roll call by giving the 
most important AIM you hope to accomplish before 
next Convocation. 4. Send Convocational Fund in. 
an envelope with name of organization and amount 
on it. 5. Have special prayers for this meeting. 
6. Please notify Mrs. Richard Williams or Betsy 
Green, Greenville, the number that will attend from 
your parish. 

Your summer work this year was to raise an Edu- 
cational Fund for the Bishop to use for students for 
the ministry. If you have not already done so, 
please send your check to Mrs. John Guion, New 
Bern. 

In beginning your new year's work, may I suggest 
the following: That you either have a program 
committee to put on a program for each regular 
meeting or ask each Department Chairman to be 
responsible for one program each year, using sug- 
gestions found in your Diocesan Program. 

Please appoint a leader for the old and shut-ins 
of the women in your parish. They need the spirit- 
ual and educational life of your auxiliary, even if 
they cannot attend the meetings. Also ask that they 
pray for your auxiliary at the time your meeings are 
held. 

More interest will be gained in your work this fall 
by having an inter-denominational study class using 
"That Other America" by John MacKay as your 
study book. 

Secretary Hull has asked that we engage in a Cru- 
sade against Avar. We should gladly accept this 
challenge through daily prayer and study. It will 
be helpful to interview the new book "Why Mars 
Must Cease" by a group of Ten American Women. 
(MacMillan). In addition to this please Avrite your 
congressmen and senators to stand back of our Presi- 
dent in his neutrality program. 

With love and best wishes, I am 
Sincerely, 

MAY CAHOON CARAWAN, 
President Convocation of Edenton. 



Dear Co-Workers : 

In beginning and making plans for our Fall and 
Winter work, may we accept as our Motto this year, 
"Forward and Onward " To advance will mean 
tireless effort, a larger vision and deeper knowledge 
of our 'Church and its needs, united cooperation and 
sympathetic understanding, prayer and willingness 
to serve. In reviewing your work from January 1st 
to June 1st, I find that several of the Auxiliaries 
have increased financially and in interest. Rejoice. 
While Ave have much to be proud of and thankful for 
as loyal Church women Ave cannot be content with 
past achieA r ements, but rather, in this day of wonder- 
ful opportunity we are compelled to e\'aluate our 
work, and with united prayer and effort press for- 
ward as never before. 

May I offer the following suggestions in planning 
your work for the coming year. 

Have your Auxiliary well organized with Presi- 
dent, Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer, Educa- 
tional Secretary, Supply Chairman, Social Service 
Chairman, Church Periodical Chairman, and United 
Thank Offering Custodian. Appoint a Program 
Chairman, Visiting Chairman, Music Chairman and 
Devotional Leader. 

Arrange your program for the entire year, (some- 
thing very definite is gained by doing this), incorpo- 
rate in it the Auxilary Program and the Auxliary 
Annual. 

Work in the Five Fields of Service, Avhich are Pa- 
rish, Community, Diocese, Nation and World. 

Make much of the devotional part of your meet- 
ing; the Devotional Leader to be responsible for 
Bible readings, prayers and meditations. Have the 
Muse Chairman select the hymns and arrange musi- 
cal selections to add variety to the program. 

Provide your President with a Manual and General 
Church Program. Secure a copy of the "News Bul- 
letin" sent out monthly by the Department of Pub- 
Tcity at the Church Mission House, 281 — 4th Avenue, 
NeA/ York City. This Bulletin is sent free upon re- 
quest and can be used to good advantage at Roll 
Call, when each member should read one current 
event. 

Try assembling material for a Lending Library, 
include in it copies of the Spirit of Missions the Liv- 
ing Church, Mission Herald and other Church papers, 
send to the Church Missions House for special leaf- 
lets many of which will be sent you free. 

Study the requirements for getting on the Honor 
Roll, you will find them on Page 10 of the Auxiliary 
Annual. 



OCTOBER. 1935 



13 



Study the projects in your Apportionment and 
you will realize what a wonderful opportunity it 
gives for service. 

Give every member something to do and insist up- 
on its being done. Visit each member at least twice 
a year and call on all new comers and enlist their in- 
terest and aid. If possible have two social meetings 
a year. Meetings of this kind are not only enjoyable 
but increase felloAvshp. 

The Convocation of Wilmington will be held on 
Wednesday. November 6th, at St. Mary's Church, 
Kinston, N. C, beginning at 10:30 A. M. with a cele- 
bration of the Holy Communion. The members of 
St. Mary's Woman's Auxiliary have extended a most 
cordial invitation to the members of the Woman's 
Auxiliary to meet with them. 

A program that will be helpful, interesting and in- 
spiring is being arranged, and it is my earnest hope 
that a number of women from every Parish Branch 
will attend. The program will be sent to you later. 
Will the Secretaries of each Parish Branch send a 
card to Mrs. D. L. Dixon. 208 South McLewean 
Street, Kinston, N. C, with the number of women she 
may expect from her Parish. Will the President of 
each Parish Branch have a volun + ary offering taken 
up at their Auxiliary meeting just before the Con- 
vocatioiial Meeting, to be used as you think best in 
our Auxiliary work in the Convocation. 

The Day of Prayer will be observed again this 
year. Plan to make it a real day of Prayer, that in 
this day of world-wide unrest and turmoil peace may 
reign on earth. 

May we in the words of Whittier say : 

Dear Lord and Father of mankind 
Forgive our foolish ways! 
Reclothe us in our rightful mind, 
In purer lives thy service find, 
In deeper reverence, praise. 
With love and every good wish, and hoping that I 
shall have the pleasure of seeing many of you at our 
Convocational Meeting, I am 

Faithfully yours. 

ANN P. BECKWITH, 
President of the Convocation of Wilmington 



NEW COMMUNION SILVER 



St. Stephen's to Dedicate New Service At Sunday 
Morning- Servico 



The new set consists of a sterling silver chalice, 
a gift of Mrs. Hugh Humphrey in memory of her 
mother, the inscription on which reads: "In Memo- 
riam — Pocahontas Happer Bumgardner — 1846-1929." 

The service also includes a silver paten and cibo- 
rium and two American crystal glass cruets. 

This new set will be dedicated and used for the 
first time at the eleven o'clock service Sunday. 

The pewter communion service which has been 
used at the church since the silver was stolen was 
loaned by Mrs. Arnold Borden. It is a very old and 
valuable service, having been brought from Scotland 
by an ancestor of Mrs. Borden in the late 1700's and 
used in an old Presbyterian church in South Carolina. 
After the death of the minister the church was closed 
and the communion service which consisted of sev- 
eral pieces was given to the Hemphil family and has 
been handed down as cherished possessions. 



HOLY INNOCENTS', LENOIR COUNTY 



A new set of sterling silver and crystal glass com- 
munion silver has been obtained by St. Stephen's 
Episcopal Church, Coldsboro, to take the place of 
the silver service stolen last spring. 



By Mrs. A. C. D. Noe 

For the past few weeks I have been trying to de- 
cide what is the greatest need of a clergyman work- 
ing in a rural field, and have come to the conclusion 
that it is "Leaders". Where you have them there is 
no doubt about the work going forward. Very few 
people in a congregation will refuse to help put over 
a worth-while program if they have a Christian lead- 
er. Especially are they needed in a community 
where a clergyman has to serve several places with 
only one Sunday a month for each Church. With 
good leadei's he can direct the work, but he cannot 
possibly be at all the places, and attend every meet- 
ing with five churches on the list. 

I would like to call attention to some work that is 
being carried on at Holy Innocents' Church, near 
Seven Springs, in Lenoir County. For the seven 
years that we have served this group of churches 
there has been only one Sunday in each year that 
Sunday School is not held there. By mutual agree- 
ment the Sunday after Christmas is "Vacation Day". 
Not because it is too cold, but to give them the op- 
portunity to visit the churches of their friends, or to 
just rest. 

Oscar Hardv has been superintendent for more 
than forty years and during that time has held such 
a high standard, that the people now look upon the 
Sunday School as being a privilege and a pleasure 
that all people do not have. The attendance has 
held up through the years. Each Sunday the Secre- 
tary, Lehman Barwick, gives such a concise and 
well-kept report of what has been done that a person 
can tell at once the status today and one year ago. 
The number varies less than half a dozen members, 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD 



each year. The offering is usually an increase. 

The training those young people are receiving is 
showing results. I know of no other parish where 
the young people attend almost 100 per cent, or an- 
other where they partake of the Holy Communion 80 
or 90 per cent. When they reach the age to decide 
for themselves they come up for confirmation and the 
general work of the church. 

Another instance in which I can see the result of 
leadership is in the Woman's Auxiliary. When we 
first took charge of the work interest lagged. If 
there were six or eight persons present that was con- 
sidered good attendance. Miss Mayme Whitfield 
was elected president. She suggested that the meet- 
ings be held in the homes, and after the devotional 
and business session have a social hour. The plan 
worked. Now after four or five years it takes a 
good sized living; room to accomodate the crowd. 

Saturday afternoon when I attended the last meet- 
ing there were 28 members present. They have an 
enrollment of 35 or 40. One thing that especially 
impressed me was: the Young Women as well as 
those of mature years taking part in the program. 
Those who usually feel that they are too young to be 
working in the Auxiliary and too old for League 
work. 

Besides meeting all their assessments as they come 
due, they work in all the five fields of service. At 
the present time they are helping to raise money to 
paint the church. They do a great social service 
work in the community. A few weeks ago they fix- 
ed up a delicious picnic supper, and with the per- 
mission of the keeper of Lenoir County's County 
Home, went over there and had a devotional service 
for the inmates, spread the supper and invited the 
inmates to partake with them. No one except those 
who have a part in such a project can imagine the 
enjoyable time they had. They told others. 

One of the most interesting services I ever attend- 
ed was at this snme County Home last Sunday after- 
noon, with the Young People's Service League from 
Holy Innocents' Church. They asked their Rector 
and wife to join them in giving a devotional service 
and religious program for the inmates, who are so 
physically handicapped,, and requested Mr. Noe to 
make a short talk. There we were with the halt, 
the lame, and the blind, and about 18 or 20 young 
pe-nle, sinp-insr with them, praying with them and 
rejoicing with them. I do not know who received 
the greatest pleasure, those giving or those receiving. 

After the service the League served candy, and we 
stayed around awhile just to get acquainted. 

There are too many good workers in the League 
at Holy Innocents' to mention any one as an out- 
standing leader, but one can tell by their works what 
they do. 



THE CHURCH MINISTERS TO HER SCATTERED 
MEMBERS 



By Rev. Leon Malone 

Tradition tells xis that in the days of the early 
Church the Apostles followed the Master's command 
and carried the Gospel to all nations of the world by 
each Apostle going to a particular territory. St. 
James went to Spain, St. Thomas to India, St. Mark 
to Egypt, St. Peter (perhaps) to Rome, and St. Paul 
to Asia Minor and Greece. They saw to it that 
every part of the world had the Gospel preached to 
it, that every part had at least some of the work of 
the Church carried on there. 

It has ever been the aim of the Church to cover 
the entire earth. 

The Church in America is divided into dioceses, 
and the dioceses into parishes so that some Rector is 
in charge of and responsible for the work in a par- 
ticular parish. For a number of reasons we have 
failed in this respect, and right here in East Caro- 
lina there are whole counties and large territories 
for which no particular Clergyman is responsible. 
There are a large number of scattered members of 
the Church and possibilities for, and even requests 
for new work in these territories. It seems to me 
that if we fail as individuals or if we sponsor, or 
even tolerate a system that does not meet these needs 
we are failing the Master Christ and the plan of His 
'Church. 

Other dioceses have worked out plans for extending 
the Church's Ministry to Her scattered members, and 
for providing Religious Training for the children in 
such homes. East Carolina should have such a pro- 
gram. It need not be so very extensive for the 
present, or expensive. However, I believe it would 
be most effective, and that it can be done well with 
our present facilities. 

Church School Literature and books can be placed 
in the homes of the scattered members, and the homes 
of rural people who cannot attend a 'Church School 
because of distance, for home study work. This lit- 
erature could be distributed quarterly by a Clergy- 
man, who on these visits would administer the Sacra- 
ments of the Church whenever the occasion called 
for it, and give instructions and Pastoral care. 

P^amilies and individuals would be found who 
Av r ould serve as a neucleus for beginning new work 
in a new territory. A great many of our parishes, 
incidentally, had their beginning in somebody's 
home. The time has not yet come when we can af- 
ford to be satisfied with the number of communicants 
and parishes we have. 

I believe that the free will offerings of the people 
served by such a diocesan program will very nearly 
make it a self-sustaining proposition. 



OCTOBER, 1935 



15 



cTHfb MISSION HERAtD 



The Mission Herald is the official organ of the Diocese of East 
Carolina. 

The subscription price is $1.00 a year, payable in advance. 

It should be in every home in the Diocese. 

We would like to take this opportunity to urge those subscribers 
who have not paid their subscriptions to do so at once and to ask 
the people of the Diocese who do not take the paper to send a dol- 
lar for a subscription to the Editor Jand Business Manager, Rev. 
Walter R. Noe, 507 Southern Building, Wilmington, N. C. 



STATEMENT OF THE AMOUNTS PAID BY THE PARISHES AMD MISSIONS POK DIOCESAN AND GENERAL, 

CHURCH WORK, JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1»35. 



Partakes 

Beaufort, St. Paul's $ 

Clinton, St. Paul's 

Fayetteville, St. John's 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 

Hope Mills, Christ Church 

Kinston, St. Mary's 

New Bern, Christ Church 

Red Springs, St. Stephen's . . 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' .. 

Southport, St. Philip's 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd 

Wilmington, St. James' 

Wilmington St. John's 

Wilmington, St. Paul's 

Organized Missions. 

Burgavv, St. Mary's 

Faison, St. Gabriel's 



Parishes 

Aurora, Holy Cross 

Ayden, St. James' 

Bath, St. Thomas' 

Belhaven, St. James' 

Bonnerton, St. John's 

Chocowinity. Trinity 

Columbia, St. Andrew's 

Creswell, St. David's 

Edenton, St. Paul's 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church 

Farmville, Emmanuel 

Gatesville, St. Mary's 

Greenville, St. Paul's 

Grifton, St. John's 

Hamilton, St. Martin's 

Hertford, Holy Trinity ...... 

Jessama, Zion 

Lake Landing. St. George's .. 
Plymouth, Grace Church . . . . 

Roper. St. Luke's 

Washington, St Peter's 

Williamston, Advent 



CONVOCATION OF WILMINGTON. 



Pnrlnbes 

Fayetteville. St. Joseph's 
New Bern, St. Cyprian's . . 
Wilmington, St. Mark's . . 



Organized Mission* 

Belhaven. St. Marv's 

Edenton, St. John-Evangelist 
El^.abeth C ! ty, St. Phi ip's .. 

Goldsboro. St. Andrew's 

Kinston, St. Ancr'istine's 
Washington, St. Paul's 



Expec- 


Paid to 


tations 


Oct. 23 


365.20 


$ 95.05 


50.00 


50.00 


2,150 00 


997.26 


1 000.00 


331.01 


60.00 


30.00 


1,000.01 


575.00 


2.125.00 


1,086.69 


55.00 


48.00 


200.00 


14.87 


169.60 


113.13 


371.40 


261.71 


9 781.50 


6,22'4.09 


2,031.60 


1,348.58 


1,200.00 


468.61 


35.00 


18.72 


65.00 


47.46 


CONVOCATION 


250.00 


94.68 


300.S0 




35.00 


20.42 


350.00 


33.06 


100.00 


48.88 


100.00 




200.00 


115.38 


300.00 


116.50 


1,559 SO 


900.00 


1,008.76 


729. SI 


23S.20 


119.10 


128.00 


22.03 


1.356 20 


1,018.55 


200. on 


8.10 


65.00 


50 00 


4io. no 


166 67 


inn n n 


52 50 


200.00 


56.30 


200 no 


100.00 


75.00 


50.50 


1,500.00 


1,015.65 


100.00 


111.19 


LOCATION 


OF COLOl 


104.00 


io.oo 


420 no 


215.00 


140.00 


121.18 


105.00 


28.32 


im.no 


62.22 


20.15 


14 50 


60.00 


34.99 


75.no 


75.00 


120.00 


30.36 



Lumberton, Trinity 

North West, All Soul's. . . . 
Pikeville. St. George's .... 
Trenton, Grace Church 

Vanceboro, St. Paul s 

Whiteville, Grace Church .. 
Wrightsville, St. Andrews 



Unorganized Missions. 

Jasper, St. Thomas' 

Pollocksville, Mission . 

Wilmington, Delgado Mission 



Parochial Missions. 

Campbellton St. Philip's . . 
Tolar-Hart, Good Shepherd. 



Total 



OF EDENTON 

Windsor, St Thomas'. . . 

Winton, St. John's 

Woodviile, Grace Church 



Organized Missions 

Ahoskie. St. Thomas' , 

Fairfield, All Saints' 

Murfreesboro, St. Barnabas' 

Roxobel. St. Mark's 

Sladesville, St. John's ... 
Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' . 
Sunbury, St. Peter's 
Swan Quarter, Calvary . . . 
Winterville, St. Luke's . . 
Yeatesville, St. Matthew's 



Unorganized Missions. 

Avoca, Holy Innocents' 
Camden, St. Joseph's 



Total 



Expec- 


Paid to 


tation? 


Oct. 23 


174.00 


112.00 


10.00 


5.04 


20.00 


20.00 


15 00 


11.50 


30.00 


6.07 


100.00 


60.00 


6.00 


5.75 


20.00 




20.00 




10.00 


15.00 


25.00 


8.37 


70.00 


72.68 


$ 21,159.30 


112,016.59 


225.00 


94.17 


100.00 


45.17 


150.00 


150.00 


55.00 




10.00 




30.00 


20. or 


•92 08 


75.55 


10.00 




100.00 


50.00 


42.00 


33.23 


20.00 


10 75 


125.00 


125.00 


20.00 


20.00 


80.00 


28.80 


10.00 


5.00 


$ 9.S35.04 


$ 5.517.09 



Unorganized Missions, 

Aurora, St. Jude's 

Beaufort, St. Clement's 

Oreenville, St. Andrew's ,. .• . 

Hnddock's Cross Roads, St. Stephen's 

Roper. St. Ann's 

Wilmington, "Brooklyn" Mission... 
Wr'ghtsville, St. Augustine's 



Total 

Grand Total 



43.00 




5.00 


40.IKI 




26.30 


30.00 






30.00 




13.25 


26.00 




4.00 


20.00 




10.00 


20.00 




10.00 


$ 1,3.-)4.15 


$ 


660.12 


% 32,348.49 


$18,193 80 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD 



— * 



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RECTOR 



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Wilmington, N. C. 




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RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Conducted for Negro Youth under the auspices of the Epis- 
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A four year accredited College Course is offered, leading to 
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A College Preparatory Department, Training School for Nurses 
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Thorough training, healthy environment. Christian influences, s 
I For Catalog and information write — j 

I j The Registrar f 

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108 Princess Street 
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| SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

| JUNIOR COLLEGE 

! Raleigh, North Carolina 

I 

f An Episcopal School for girls — Have your daughter 

j receive her education in a church school. 

j Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, B. S., 

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! Saint Mary's offers 4 years' High School and 2 

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— — + +- 



yjt' 2 }^ 



M 28'3fi 



Jan . 36 

Library, lu N. C. 

Chapel Hill, !■•. C 






VOLUME XLIX 



tssurn 

Irralt 







NUMBER 11 



lift- Ijira-f Ijat- tjtarr tfj$ay- comr TKw.22: 

CHURCH KALENDAR JF 

For December, 1935 



17 



1. First Sunday in Advent— Violet. 
8. Second Sunday in Advent — Violet. 
15. Third Sunday in Advent — Violet 

21 St. Thomas— (Red, Violet for Eve). 

22 Fourth Sunday in Advent — Violet 

25. Christmas Day— White. 

26. St. Stephen— Red 

27. St. John, Evang.— White. 

28. Holy Innocents.— Violet. 

29. First Sunday After Christmas— While 

NOVEMBER, 1935 










\s 




THE MISSION HERALD 



NOTES FROM FRIENDLY HALL 




The month of October was an unusually busy one 
at Friendly Hall, the program a very interesting one. 
It began with our first Auxiliary meeting on October 
7th. Reports' were made by the officers upon the 
work done last year in the various fields. Most out- 
standing was the Social Service project — a layette 
made for a baby girl, who along with foui brothers 
and sisters, has recently been baptized at St. Paul's. 
A nominating committee was appointed and request- 
ed to make a report at the next meeting. The offi- 
cers to be elected are to fill the vacancies which oc- 
curred this fall when some of the offic3rs did not ve-. 
turn to college. The speaker of the evening was the 
Reverend Worth Wicker, our Rector, who spoke to us 
on the ''Purpose of the Woman's Auxiliary." He 
gave us an interesting account of the history and de- 
velopment of the Auxiliary from its very beginning. 
He pointed out the fact that each woman baptized 
into the Church is a member of the Woman's Aux- 
iliary and should assume her responsibilities and du- 
ties accordingly. From his talk we obtained a clear 
idea of the real meaning of membership in the Wom- 
an's Auxiliary. A delightful supper was prepared 
for this meeting by Mrs. E. B. Ferguson of St. Paul's 
Parish. Our most sincere thanks to Mrs. Ferguson. 

We were fortunate to be able to borrow a radio 
for the Episcopal Church of the Air broadcast on 
Sunday, October 20th. Bishop Hobson's address on 
the Forward Movement was a source of real inspira- 
tion to those who were present at the Sunday morn- 
ing Student Class. Speaking of radios, isn't there 
a friend in the Diocese who has an'extra one? If. so,: 
we'd give it a nice home at Friendly Hall, and how 
grand it would be not to have to "go borrowing" 
again- 

"Open House" suppers on Saturday nights have 
been very well attended, with a large per cent of 
girls from other "churches. These evenings of gaietv 
are bright spots in the lives of those girls who attend. 
The informal and ''homey" atmosphere which per- 



vades Friendly Hall is a pleasant change from dormi- 
tory life. On October 26th Friendly Hall was deco- 
rated beautifully for Hallowe'en. Only a few of us 
were able to be present due to campus activities 
which demanded the presence of most of th ^ group. 
After supper we had great fun, toasting laarshmal- 
lows and buns while Miss Dora Coates, one of the 
College teachers, told us ghost sitorier. Tii.re was 
no light except for the spooky light of 'the jack o' 
lanterns. 

The climax of our first month was reached last 
Sunday, October 27th. The day began with our Cor- 
porate Communion Service at 7 :30 A. M., followed 
by breakfast in Friendly Hall. This service was pre- 
ceded by a Preparation service on Friday the 25th. 
We shall follow the same plan each month and we 
hope that this hour together with each other and our 
Lord — will be a source of spiritual strength for the 
enrichment of our daily lives. 

The event of the Fall came on the evening of Sun- 
day, October 27th, when the Parish entertained the 
Students at supper. The banquet hall was very col- 
orful with Hallowe'en Decorations and fall flowers. 
The Rector presided, and short talks were made by 
Mr. W. IT. Hall. Miss May wood Wagner, and Mr. F. 
C. Harding. A spirit of real fellowship was shared 
by all who attended. The crowd numbered over a 
hundred. Supper was followed by Evening Prayer 
in the Church, and it was great to see such a con- 
gregation on a Sunday evening! The service was 
followed by a social hour in Friendly Hall which 
was unusually beautiful with its open fire, its deep 
ied drapes, and lovely flowers. AVe enjoyed vocal 
music by Mrs. Wicker and Miss Bessie Brown ; also 
games and stories, which left everyone in a jovial 
mood. Let us take this opportunity to thank St. 
Paul's Parish for a delightful evening. 

MARY TARRY, 

Publicity Chairman. 



SUNDAY SCHOOL CLASS ORGANIZED 
AT WINDSOR 



Twenty-seven men and women of St. Thomas', 
Windsor, met at the Rectory Wednesday evening, 
November 6 to organize a new adult class. Mr. I. T. 
Smith was elected Teacher, Mrs. Cola Castelloe. Pres- 
ident, and Mrs. Walter Burden, Secretary and Treas- 
urer. The renewed interest of the grown people of 
the parish in the Church School lias been a sreat hebj 
to the new superintendent, Mr. Stephen Kenny, in 
reorganizmg and extending the work of the Church 
School. We look for a 100% increase in attendant? 
and enrollment by the first of the year. ., 



The Mission Herald 



VOLUME XLIX 



WILMINGTON, N. C , NOVEMBER, 1935 



NUMBER 11 



BISHOP'S LETTER 



On Friday, October the twenty-fifth at 8 :00 P. M. 
I preached in St. James' Church, Belhaven, this 
being my first official visit to the parish since the 
Re'\ . A. J. Mackie assumed the rectorship. 

At nine o'clock of the same evening, I preached 
and confirmed two persons, presented by the Rev. 
J. B. Brown, in St. Mary's Church, Belhaven. 

On Saturday the twenty-sixth, I conducted ser- 
vices and preached in All Saints' Church, Fairfield, 
at three P. M. 

On Sunday the twenty-seventh at 11:00 A. M. I 
preached and celebrated Holy Communion in St. 
Oeorge's Church, Lake Landing. In the afternoon 
1 preached in Calvary Church, Swan Quarter, and 
at night in St. John's Church, Sladesville. 

The Rev. A. J. Mackie assisted me in all of the 
services and I was pleased to note that he had al- 
ready made a most favorable impression upon the 
fine people who make up the Hyde County congre- 
gations. 

On Monday, 'the twenty-eighth, I presided at the 
Virginia Seminary Alumni luncheon in Christ 
Church Parish House, Raleigh. 

On Sunday, November third, I preached at the one 
hundredth anniversary of my former parish, St. 
James', Richmond. 

On Wednesday, the sixth, I attended the meeting 
of the Wilmington Convocation in St. Mary's Church. 
Kinston. celebrating Holy Communion alt 10:00 A. M. 
and making an address at noon. 

On Thursday, the seventh, I attended the meeting 
of the Convocation of Edenton in St. Paul's Church, 
Greenville, making an address to the men of the 
Convocation at 11:00 A. M. and to the women at 
3 :00 P. M. 

The meetings of both Convocations were helpful 
and inspiring, and I was especially pleased to note 
the large attendance of laymen at the Greenville 
meeting. 

On the night of the seventh I preached and con- 
firmed one person, presented by the Rev. Sidney E. 
Matthews, in Grace Church, Plymouth. 

On Friday, the eighth, I preached in St. Ann's, 
Roper, at 6:30 P. M. and in St. Luke's, Roper, at 
8:00 P. M. 

On Sunday the tenth, at 11 :00 A. M. I preached 
and confirmed six persons presented by the Rev. 
John W. Hardy, in Christ Church, Creswell. 

In the afternoon I preached and confirmed seven 



persons, presented by Mr. Hardy, in Galilee Mission, 
Lake Phelps. 

At night, in St. Andrew's Church, Columbia, I 
preached and confirmed one person, presented by 
Mr. Hardy. 

Following the night service in Columbia, the mem- 
bers of the Creswell and Columbia churches tendered 
me a reception at the home of Mr. and Mrs Bachman 
in kindly recognition of my birthday. 

Having learned of the fire which had so seriously 
threatened St. Peter's Church, I stopped by Wash- 
ington on Monday, the eleventh, to ascertain the 
damage and to express my profound thankfulness 
that the beautiful church had not been destroyed. 

On the evening of the twelfth, I attended the 
Annual Supper of the men of St. James' Church, 
Wilmington, and made an address on the hopes, 
needs and plans of the Diocese. 

On Friday afternoon, the fifteenth, I spoke to 
the women of St. James' Parish, Wilmington, on 
the hopes, needs and plans of the Diocese. 

In the evening I attended the parish supper in 
St. John's Parish House, Wilmington, and intro- 
duced the speaker, Rev. John L. Jackson of Charlotte. 

On Sunday, the seventeenth,, at 11 :30 A. M I 
preached in St. Thomas' Church, Windsor. 

In the afternoon I preached in Holy Innocents' 
Church, Avoca, and at night in Grace Church, Wood- 
ville. I was assisted in these services by the new 
Rector, Rev. Wm. M. Latta, who has entered enthus- 
iastically into the fine, promising work in Bertie 
County. 

On the night of Monday, the eighteenth, I preached 
and confirmed two persons, presented by Mr. Latta, 
in St. Mark's Church, Roxobel. 

On Tuesday the 19th, at 10:30 A. M. I confirmed 
four persons, presented by the Ricv. Stephen Gard- 
ner, in Brown Memorial Chapel, St. Peter's Parish, 
Washington. 

This letter is being written on November twen- 
tieth, and my engagements for the remainder of the 
month are: St. John's, Pitt County; St. Luke's, 
Winterville and St. James', Ayden, on the twenty- 
fourth and the parish supper of St. John's, Fayette- 
ville on the 'twenty-sixth. 

Preparations for the Every-Member Canvass seem 
to be going forward splendidly in many places 
throughout the diocese and, in some parishes and 
missions the canvass has already been successfully 
completed. 

(Continued on page 13.) 



THE MISSION HERALD 



THE ADVENTURE OF DISCIPLESHIP 



By the Rt. Rev. Henry W. Hobson, D. D., Bishop of 

Southern Ohio; Chairman Forward Movement 

Commission 



Broadcast for the Epicopal Church of the Air 



A policeman, who was also a philosopher, called 
out to a crowd which was milling around, blocking 
traffic, and getting nowhere, "If you want to stand 
here, you'll have to move on." It was this order 
which was given to the Episcopal Church when the 
command "Forward March" was issued, and a com- 
mission on the Forward Movement was appointed 
just a year ago today. We faced a Church member- 
ship many of whom were "milling around, blocking 
traffic and getting nowhere". 

Last February when I spoke on the Forward Move- 
ment at one of the Church of the Air services, I asked 
some of you to join me in looking honestly at the 
rather tragic conditions which existed in certain as- 
pects of our Church's life and work. I shall not 
take any time today to consider again the situation 
which made a Forward Movement imperative. It is 
enough to say that the loyal members of the Church 
deeply concerned about what they saw, and yearning 
to have the Church stand more firmly in the life of 
the individual and the life of the world, cried out — 
"If you want to stand here you'll have to move on." 
It was a cry of agony — yes, because it hurt grievous- 
ly to see the Church missing great opportunities. It 
was a cry of longing— yes, because the world's need 
for the Gospel of Christ was so appalling. It was a 
cry of courage — yes, because there were many eager 
and ready to go forth, not counting the cost, in the 
Church's warfare. It was a cry of faith — yes, above 
all else, because it was founded on an unswerving 
conviction that it is Cod's purpose that the Church 
shall proclaim the Gospel of Christ with new power 
in our day, and that He will give us the strength of 
His Spirit to fulfill that purpose. 

Every Forward Mwement which has ever taken 
place in the Church has been marked by the response 
of loyal Disciples of Christ to His call "Follow Me", 
and we can be dead certain that this does not mean 
to follow Him in a retreat, or to go around in a circle, 
but it demands that we move on — that we go forth as 
Disciples to share in Ids advance. Therefore, in this 
present Forward Movement "Loyal Discipleship" 



has been the rallying cry calling members to renew 
their allegiance to the Master. We have been chal- 
lenged to put aside all compromise, to have done with 
the dishonest practice of watering-down, and to ask 
with courage — "What must I do to prove my Disci- 
pleship?" 

The story of the response which has come during 
the past nine months to this call to renewal is an 
amazing one. Bishop Stires of Long Island express- 
ed what many who have been watching closely have 
felt when he said to me recently. "The influence and 
results of the Forward Movement have gone far, far 
beyond our hopes and expectations of a year ago." 
A new power is coming into the Church. Even 
though we realize fully that only a beginning has 
been made, yet what has happened to those individ- 
uals and in those places where the Forward Move- 
ment has been given the right of way is truly a mira- 
cle. And it is a miracle which is coming not as the 
result of any new program set forth by a small group 
of men, for the Commission on the Forward Move- 
ment has resisted the temptation, which many have 
voiced, to set forth a hard and fast program, and in- 
stead has asked the clergy and people of the Church 
to unite in building the program — to share in a re- 
discovery of what it means to travel the Disciple's 
way. As a result individuals, parishes, dioceses and 
organizations, have been rising up to make their con- 
tributions. A rebirth is taking place — but not ac- 
cording to machine-like procedure— for the wind is 
blowing where it listeth, and reports come from hith- 
er and yon — often from most surprising places — -tell- 
ing of advances being made and victories won. It has 
become an adventure, and instead of spending these 
minutes together on the details of what is happening 
I want to talk to you about the spirit that is back of 
it — the adventure of Discipleship. 

Some of you will want more detailed in- 
formation about the Forward Movement 
which there is not time to give you today. 
Some wil] wish copies of our literature. 
Write to Forward Movement headquarters, 
Episcopal Church, 223 West 7th Street, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. And one more word before I 
continue — please do not excuse yourself for 
not going to church this morning by listen- 
ing to this broadcast. It is now ten. If the 
sen ice at your church is at eleven o'clock 
you will have time to reach it after the 
broadcast. If it is at 10:30 it is time you 
left now. It is far more important for you 
to be present this morning with your fellow 
Christians in church than it is for you to 
listen to anything I may say. 



NOVEMBER. 1935 



E'very great adventure involves a discovery. When 
a knowledge of all the facts in a situation make for 
certainty, then adventure gives way to routine. The 
value of the discovery determines the appeal of the 
adventure. The supreme adventure in man's experi- 
ence through the ages has been his discovery of God, 
for to know Him is life and to miss Him is death. 
Christian Disciplesnip offers us the supreme adven- 
ture because it calls us to be followers and compani- 
ons of One whose paramount purpose is to make it 
possible for us to discover Cod. Philip voiced the 
etc nal longing of man when he said. "Lord show us 
the Father, and it suffieeth us." And in His answer 
Christ pointed the way of adventurous Discipleship — 
"He that hath seen Me hath seen the Father." When 
the Master said, "I am the way," He meant above 
all else, "I am the way of adventure which if a man 
will travel courageously he will make the supreme 
discovery — Cod." 

In calling men to Discipleship the Forward Move- 
ment therefore places at the very center of its pro- 
gram the essential importance of discovering God. 
Much that has been done during the first year lias 
been focused on this adventure. Discipleship has been 
presented not as a vague relationship with a far- 
away figure of the past, but as a definite way involv- 
ing the seven steps which make it possible for us to 
walk as Disciples of a living Christ. "If ye continue 
in my way, then are ye my Disciples", and, as I have 
said, His way is the way to Cod. Each of the seven 
steps — Turn, Follow, Learn. Pray, Serve, Worship 
and Share — which have been so constantly empha- 
sized in the Forward Movement literature and con- 
ference — is a step of adventure in itself. Try taking 
them and we find, like all true adventures, that the 
way demands courage, perseverance, self-sacrifice and 
that spirit of pressing on which conquers the tempta- 
tion to turn back. The man who day by day is hon- 
estly striving to take these steps will find a thrill in 
the adventure of Discipleship. 

The emphasis which has been placed upon the im- 
portance of Bible reading, prayer and worship in the 
Forward Movement program is essential because 
these practices- call them old-fashioned if you will 
— have always played such a large part in the adven- 
ture of discovering Cod. Hundreds of thousands of 
the members of the Episcopal Church, besides many 
members of other churches are using "Forward Day 
by Day." the little manual of daily Bible readings 
and meditations which is being issued six times a 
year by the Forward Movement Commission. Have 
yoii seen the present number in its cover which looks 
like a fire cracker? If not, ask your rector for a 
copy or send to Forward Movement headquarters. 
The first order for this issue came from Anvik, 



Alaska; from Honolulu comes a note, "I am a shut-in 
So years of age. The Bible Reading booklet has 
proved such a blessing to me. 1 am anxious to pass 
it on. I pray morning and night for the success of 
i he Forward Movement." From a man in New Jer- 
sey a letter, "I am using the booklet and passing it 
on to otheis. The other day a friend, met casually 
in tue ferry house at Hoboken. asked me if I had seen 
it and spoke enthusiastically about it." Such simple 
reports, coming from all parts of the world, are cer- 
tain proof that many are embarking on journeys of 
adventure. It is true that Lie majority are Still tied 
up tight to their old moorings, but it is encouraging 
to kuuw that the circulation of these Bible Reading 
booklets is ten times greater than in the use of simi- 
lar material in the past, and that since last Lent over 
two million copies have been distributed. Try the dai- 
ly adventure of using "Forward Day by Day." The 
present issue covers October and November. The 
next issue for Advent and Christmas will be ready 
for distribution about November first. Plan now to 
get extra copies to share your adventure with your 
friends. 

The Forward Movement will continue to demand 
that a Disciple must do more than accept certain 
ethical practices known as Christian standards. 
Through faithfulness in prayer, study of the scrip- 
tures, worship and service he must develop what we 
call personal religion which is really nothing more nor 
less than a personal relationship with God. He must 
become an adventurer ; ready to sail an unknown sea, 
but using those aids to navigation which time has 
proved of supreme value : facing storms and dangers 
with that courage which carries him ever onward in 
the journey which leads to the discovery of God. 

The Forward Movement, however, does not en- 
courage a pillar-dweller type of Discipleship. Im 
portant as is the adventure which leads us to God, 
the Christian Disciple is also called to discover a new 
and more noble relationship with his fellow beings. 
Christ insisted upon this when He answered the ques- 
tion about which is the greatest commandment. The 
Disciple's life must include his relations with God 
AND with his neighbor. All the maladjustments in 
our families, in social, economic, racial, national or 
international life, are the result of men's not being 
able to get along with each other. What a great ad- 
venture awaits the man who seeks to discover the 
new relationship which will help to unite men as 
God's children and brothers of one another. 

In the Church this adventure in human relation- 
ship demands that we shake off the nightmare of sel- 
fish individualism, and awake to a fuller sense of our 
common purpose and responsibilities. It is calling 
our men into united action. The president of the 



6 



THE MISSION HERALD 



Laymen's League reports a new wave of interest and 
enthusiasm during recent months. It encourages our 
adult members to offer youth a fulller share in the 
Church's life, and stimulates youth to be eager in 
seeking out and seizing new opportunities for service. 
It demands that as fellow members of the Church we 
avoid the temptation to put the blame for what may 
be wrong on others, and instead show forth a finer 
loyalty toward each other and toward our duly chos- 
en leaders. It helps us both to push aside the non- 
essentials which have so often created barriers be- 
tween fellow Chritians, and to strengthen the bonds 
which unite us beneath any surface difference. 

In the life of society and the world the Disciple has 
a thrilling adventure ahead as he seeks to discover 
how the teachings of Christ can be brought to bear 
upon the relations of classes, races, and nations. 
Christ stands directly opposed to those conditions, 
between individuals or nations, which produce such 
suffering, oppression and the violation of the weak 
by the strong as is prevalent in the world today. 
He took those first Disciples, transformed them, 
and sent them forth in the great adventure of 
transforming the world. His loyal Disciples have 
always been called to share in such a transforming 
Forward Movement. 

This adventure therefore demands that we face 
honestly the fact that we have too often disobeyed 
Christ's orders, and that we go forth into all the 
world to proclaim His Gospel. Unless men know 
Him the new relationships which He came to estab- 
lish between men will never come. The only way 
that men can know Him is to be told the Good News 
by those who have already received it. The Forward 
Movement must stir us to do our full part in carrying 
Christ to all the world with a new flood of that mis- 
sionary zeal which He bestowed upon those first Dis- 
ciples. We are called to express this spirit in our 
response to the opportunity which is presented as the 
Church unites in the annual Every Member Canvass. 

Whatever the Forward Movement may require of 
us, and wherever the adventure of Discipleship may 
take us, it is essential that we remember that it is 
God who calls us to share in His Forward Movement 
and it is God who gives our spirits the urge to go 
forth in adventure. It is because God is marching 
on, it is because He lives the adventuresome life, that 
we find the new Spirit stirring throughout the 
Church today. Man responds because God's Spirit 
enters his life and starts a fire — a fire which can not 
be insulated or segregated, but Avhich passes from 
life to life — even as we see it doing today — and unites 
men in the adventure of Discipleship — in the eternal 
Forward Movement of God. 



THE ORPHANAGE IS FACING A SERIOUS 
FINANCIAL SITUATION 



Operating on a budget cut to the bare necessities, 
of living, and with the salaries of all the staff twice: 
reduced, with the cost of living steadily rising, the 
Orphanage faces the coming year with a deficit, at 
the very lowest estimate), of more than $2,000.00, 

Unless the Thanksgiving offering can be made* 
much larger than heretofore, the orphanage will lie' 
forced to take drastic measures if it is to continue its. 
work. 

There seems to be a false impression in many quar- 
ters that the Orphanage has plenty of money for all 
its needs, this impression may have been created in 
part by the vast sums of money expended by the 
Government for Youth Relief, in none of which has. 
the Orphanage shared. 

Not long ago there was pubished far and wide the 
news of a large bequest to the Orphanage, and many- 
congratulations were received thereupon by the Su- 
perintendent, but because of the defalcation by the 
Administrator, not one penny ever came or ever will 
come to the Orphanage. 

Individual gifts or special Gifts have almost ceased 
to be made. Interest on the Endowment Fund has 
been much smaller, due to lesser rates of interest and' 
To default in payment of interest: 

The one offering for the Orphanage on Thanks- 
giving Day, because of welt known reasons, reaches', 
only a fraction of our Church people. There are ap- 
proximately 22,000 communicants in the three Dio- 
ceses of our State. One dollar a year from each (less. 
than half the price of one football ticket) would be- 
sufficient to ran the Orphanage for a whole year. 

Your Superintendent is confident that if the Church 
members are made acquainted with the true state of' 
the Orphanage finances, the necessary funds for keep- 
ing the doors open and the children cared for, will' 
be forthcoming speedily. 



TRANSLATING SENTIMENT INTO SUPPORT 



The Presbyterian Orphanage at Barium Springs 
has encouraged its friends to assume the actual cost 
of running the Orphanage for a particular day or- 
hour or week. The following quotation from the 
"Messenger" shows how the plan is working. 

"Last month a gift of $6 00 was received from a 
couple who wanted to operate the Orphanage for a- 
half-hour on the birthday of the husband. The time, 
7 p. m. to 7:30 p. m.. was specified for during that 
time they would be celebrating this mile-stone to^ 
aether. 



NOVEMBER, 1933.'=' 



Accompanying the gift was the following: 

"We wi'll be praying for the Orphanage at this 

houu, that. God will raise up friends with means to 

abundantly take care of the physical needs of the 

Institution." 

Perhaps there are some friends of the Thompson 

Orphanage who would like to adopt this method of 

giving to the support of the Institution. 

It costs to operate the Thompson Orphanage : 



ALUMNI OF SEMINARY HOLD MEETING 
IN RALEIGH 



For one hour - - $ 



2.82 



" one-half day - 33.891 

" one day 67.79 

" one week - - 474.53 

" one month - 2,033.70 

Let us know on what special anniversary you 
would like to run the Orphanage. Would it not 
furnish a real thrill to realize that you were support- 
ing 100 orphans for one whole day, or one whole 
week? 



BISHOP'S APPOINTMENTS FOR DECEMBER 



December 1st St. Paul's, Edenton, 11 :00 A. M/ 
St. John's, Edenton, 8:00 P. M. 

3rd Good Shepherd, Tolar Hart, 7:30 

P. M. 
4th St. Philip's, Campbellton, 7:30 .P. M. 
6th Parish Dinner, New Bern, 6 :30 P. M. 
7th Meeting Rural Work Committee, 

Washington, 10:30 K. M. 
8th Holy Trinity, Hertford, 11:00,A. ML 
St. Philip's, Elizabeth City, 4 :Q0 P. M. 
Christ Church, Elizabeth City, 8:00 
P. M. 
10th St. Mark's Church, Wilmington, 8:00 
P. M. 
. 15th . St. Peter's Church, Washington, 
11:00 A, M. 
St. Paul's Church, Vanceboro, '3:30 

P. M. 
St. Paul's Church, Washington, 8:00 
: / P.M. 
22nd St. Stephen's Church, Goldsboro, 
.. ..,.'" 11 :00 A. M. 

St. Mary's 'Church, Kinston, 7:30 
.*.':' P. M.\ 

29th St. Andrew's Church, Wrightsville, 
11.00-A. M-, 
.Del gad o Mission, Wilmington, 7:30 
P. M. 



Dean Wallace E. Rollins Is Guest of Honor 



Alumni, sometime and present students of the Vir- 
ginia Theological Seminary at Alexandria who are 
now resident in the North Carolina Episcopal dio- 
ceses, gathered in annual session at Christ Church 
parish house, October 28, in Raleigh. 

In the absence of Bishop Edwin A. Penick, who 
found it impossible to be present, Bishop Thomas C. 
Darst of the Diocese of East Carolina was toastmas- 
ter at the meeting which followed the serving of a 
luncheon by the Christ Church Service League. 

Dean Wallace E. Rollins, of the seminary, guest of 
honor, spoke on the improvements at the seminary, 
the changes that have taken place and plans for the 
future. Many of those present have been students 
at the seminary during the time that Dean Rollins 
has been at its head. 

The Rev. David Yates, rector-elect of Saint Philip's 
Church, Durham, was reappointed secretary of the 
alumni association, and Raleigh designated as the 
place of meeting for the fall of 1936. In addition to 
that of Dean Rollins, there were impromptu speeches 
by several members of the group. 

Announcement was made of the acceptance by Rev. 
Henry F. Kloman, of Farmville, of the chaplaincy of 
Saint Mary's School. 

The parish house was elaborately decorated with 
autumnal foliage. 

Those present were: Bishop Darst, Dean Rollins, 
Rev. D. P. Moore, of Weldon; Rev. Edward Bethea, 
of Rockingham; Rev. James D. Beekwith. of Clin- 
ton; Rev. Henry F. Kloman, of Farmville; Rev. Har- 
vey A. Cox, Saint Saviour's Church, Raleigh; Rev. 
George Gresham, Goldsboro; Rev. Thomas S. Clark- 
son, Smithtield ; Rev. A. E. Sanderson, Oxford ; Rev. 
Edward McConnell, Wilmington; Rev. Andrew Mil- 
stead, Statesville; Rev. Frank Dean, Wilson; Rev. 
Walter R. Noe, Wilmington ; Rev. Alenxander Miller, 
Wilmington; Rev. E. W. Halleck, Wilmington; Rev. 
Craighill Brown, Southern Pines ; Rev. Archer Boo- 
gher, Fayetteville ; Rev. James McDowell Dick of the 
Church of the Good Shepherd. Raleigh; Rev. David 
Yates, Tarboro ; Rev. Joseph N. Bynum, Roanoke 
Rapids; Rev. Henry Johnston, Jr., 'Christ Church, 
Raleigh; Charles IT. Harris, Jr., of Raleigh, student 
at the Seminary. — News and Observer. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



The Mission Herald 

ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 

Published Monthly except July and August at 

507 Southern Building 
WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor 

REV. WALTER R. NOE 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 

RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 

MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 
Advertising rates furnished on application. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to receive 
their papers, should promptly notify the Business Man- 
ager, giving when necessary, both the old and new ad- 
dress. 



SELF SUPPORT 



A number of the aided fields of the Diocese are 
interested in the Bishop's suggestion that they make 
a special effort to take care of their own work 
within the next two or three years. 

Since the inauguration of the Nation- Wide Cam- 
paign St. Joseph's, .Fayetteville; St. Mark's, Wil- 
mington; St. Paul's, Beaufort; The Church of the 
Advent, Williamston and St. Martin's, Hamilton 
have assumed self-support. 

We know that several fields are almost ready to 
take this step, and that quite a number are giving 
the matter very careful consideration. 



SUPPORT OF THE DIOCESE AND GENERAL 
CHURCH 



East Caroina can easily support its own work, if 
the communicants of the Diocese will agree on just 
one thing. That ONE THING is every communicant 
pledged to support to the best of his or her financial 
ability the missionary work of the Diocese and 
General Church. 

For 1935 the 7,061 communicants pledged $32,248.49 
for the work of the Diocese and General Church, 
including the salary of the Bishop and other items 
of Diocesan support, less than ten cents a week. 
The acceptance by the parishes and missions of the 
apportionments adopted by the Annual Convention 
at the meeting in May of this year would give us 
in 1936 about $47,000.00. 



This, financially, would put us in a position to do 
some of the much needed work. 

This, religiously: Increased missionary activity. 
More man power in the field. Salaries of present 
missionaries increased. Small places kept open. 
Opportunities grasped. Proportionate increase in 
our gifts to the work of the Church in the United 
States and beyond. 



THE NEED FOR OUR SUPPORT 

of the whole program of the Church, is shown un- 
usually well in the following letter, which was writ- 
ten by a woman of St. Mark's, Wilmington to the 
other members of the parish, in preparation for 
their Annual Every Member Canvass: 

In every well organized life, business or concern, 
there comes a time when an investigation of our 
status must be taken: an inventory, some term it; 
or a self- examination, as the Church puts it. 

Every season the Church has its season of prepa- 
ration, examination and approbation for the thought- 
ful Christian. Soon we bes-in our preparation for 
the coming of Christ — our Advent Season, beginning 
December 1st, which calls us to prayer and self- 
examination as clearly as does the Lenten Season 
Therefore, at this time the Church puts on its "Every 
Member Canvass". 

The purpose of the Canvass is to spur every 
Church member into greater activity. The Call is 
two-fold : giving and doing. Our giving is two-fold 
— our contribution to our own field and to the Mission 
field. Our doing is two-fold — for ourselves and for 
others. 

In the home field our duties are clearly defined 
by our Rector and Vestrymen. In the Mission Field, 
our work is neglected and little known. Does it 
occur to you what a few pennies EVERY week from 
EVERY parishioner in EVERY Episcopal Church 
in the United States will do for those who depend 
upon irs for their maintenance, education, physical 
protection and spiritual advancement? Our schools 
hospitals, ministers, teachers, nurses and physicians 
in mission work need our support and encourage- 
ment. Shall we fail them? We "give of our sons 
to bear the message glorious"; but we must "give 
of our wealth to speed them on their way". Do we 
"pour out our souls for them in prayer victori- 
ous" believing all that we spend "Jesus will repay"? 

Too little thought has been given to this side of 
the Church's work, but the program of the Every 
Member Canvass is to stress it and to arouse your 
interest in this phase of Christian activity. May we 
depend on you? 






NOVEMBER, 1935 



This canvass also calls for alive and doing mem- 
bers in our own Church. Your financial support, 
we are sure, will be as liberal as Clod has blessed 
you — you know and He knows. Your activity in 
the Church organizations should also be in propor- 
tion to your talents and the physical ability to exe- 
cute them. God needs you in His Church to carry 
on His work. Shall He find YOU weighed in the 
balance and found wanting? 

This is an appeal to you in the name of Him who 
gave His all, that we "might have life, and have it 
more abundantly". 

Our slogan is: "No shirkers, no slackers, no back- 
sliders, but all one hundred per cent Christians". 

Will you sign up with us? Your answer must be 
"Yes"; and in God's name we thank you for speed- 
ing the work of His Kingdom. 



PREACHING MISSIONS IN THE DIOCESE 



MRS. FRED L. OUTLAND HEAD OF FORWARD 
MOVEMENT COMMITTEE ON WOMEN'S WORK 



At a recent meeting of the Forward Movement 
Commission, held in Cincinnatii, Mrs. Fred L. Out- 
land, President of the Woman's Auxiliary of the 
Diocese of East Carolina, was appointed Chairman of 
the Forward Movement Committee on Women's 
work. Other women associates are members. Plans 
are being made for a national organization of women 
to promote the work of the Forward Movement, and 
the use of its literature in every parish in the United 
States. 



REV. JACK R. ROUNTREE WILL SERVE 

EMMANUEL, FARMVILLE AND ST. 

BARNABAS', SNOW HILL 



The Rev. Jack P. Rountree will serve EmmaniTel, 
FarmviPe, and St. Barnabas', Snow Hill. He begaii 
work in this field the first part of this month.. 

Mr. Rountree and his wife are natives of this 
State. Mr. Rountree is the nephew of Judge Rouu- 
tree. a prominent layman of the Diocese, and Mrs. 
Ponntree is the s>ster of Mrs. John G. Dawson of 
Kinston. 

Mr. Rountree has spent a large part of his ministry 
hi California. He was rector of Grace Church, Clen- 
dora. in the Diocese of Los Angeles, until recently, 
when he decided to return to North Carolina. 

For the present, Mr. Rountree and his family will 
live at Kinston. 

We are glad to have them in the Diocese of East. 
Carolina and hope that they will be very happy in 
their work. 



During the past month, the Rev. E. F. Moseley, 
has held a preaching mission for the Rev. J. Leon 
Malone at St. Barnabas', Murfreesboro and three 
missions have been held in the field served by the 
Rev. Howard Alligood— Christ Church, Hope Mills. 
Rev. J. N. Bynum, of Roanoke Rapids, in the Dio- 
cese of North Carolina: Good Shepherd, Tolar-Hart 
Village, Fayetteville, Rev. James D. Beckwith, of 
Clinton; St. Philip's, Campbellton, Fayetteville; Rev. 
W. R. Noe of Wilmington. 



REV. J. S. BRAITHWAITE ACCEPTS CALL 



The Rev. J. S. Braithwaite, D. D., has accepted a 
call to St. Joseph's. Fayetteville. 

Dr. Braithwaite has served Churches in several 
Dioceses. He came to us from Tampa, Florida, in 
the Diocese of South Florida, where he was Rector 
of St. James' Parish. 

While in the Diocese of Georgia several years ago 
Dr. Braithwaite did a great deal of Christian Social 
Service work. Through his efforts buildings were 
erected and properly equipped for effective work. 

He will find at St. Joseph's a splendid field for 
all kinds of Christian work, and a people who will 
cooperate with him in every waj r . He will have a 
plant that is equipped for educational and social 
service activities. 

We are confident that he will make a real con- 
tribution to the Diocese through his work at Fayette- 
ville and that he will be helpful to us in working 
out a real program for his people. 



CHURCH PROPERTY 



According to reports that we have received re- 
cently, our people are becoming interested in putting 
their Church property in good condition. This is 
something that should concern every Churchman. 
It is a matter that should have the careful considera- 
tion of every vestryman. Very often, a little repair 
work and paint will save considerable expense later, 
and will give you Church property that is attractive. 

Some of the places reporting improvements to 
their property are St. Philip's. Southport; St. John's 
Fayetteville: St. James', Wilmington; St. John's, 
Wilmington: St. Stephen's, Goldsboro; St. James', 
Belhaven : and St. Thomas', Windsor. Some of the 
Diocesan property has also been repaired and 
painted. 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD 



MEETING OF EDENTON CONVOCATION 



By Mrs. A. C. D. Noe. 

Thursday. November 7th, St. Paul's Church, 
Greenville, had the honor of entertaining the largest 
number of visitors at a Convocation of the Episcopal 
Church m a number of years, or, possibly, the largest 
crowd ever to attend such a meeting in the East 
Carolina diocese. The number; •was estimated to 
compare favorably with the attendance at the Dio- 
cesan Convention held -at' Bfeanfort in May. Tne 
clergy came from the meeting' with renewed courage, 
believing that people are becoming more "Church 
conscious". One minister remarked that day ' ' Some- 
thing is happening in the Church." When laymen, 
who are busy, business men, put aside worldly things 
and go forth to attend the Master's ;. business, as 
they did at this Convocation there is proof that the 
leaven is working. -Not only men, but the Woman's 
Auxiliary had representatives coming from distances 
of almost a hundred miles, in a downpour of rain. 
Truly the Forward Movement must be moving tor- 
ward. . ■.'-,?. 

■ The sessio.i opened with a < elebratior of the Holv 
Communion with Rev. Stephen Gardner, Dean of the 
Convocation and Rev. Worth Wicker, Rector of St. 
Paul's, as celebrants. 

At the men's meeting, which was held in the Par- 
ish House, officers were elected for the coming year: 
Rev. Stephen Gardner, Dean, and Rev. Leon Malone, 
secretary and treasurer. At the suggestion of Bish- 
op Darst a resoltrtion was passed, that in the future 
no person could hold the office of Dean for more 
than two years in succession. Interesting talks were 
made by the Rt, Rev. Thomas C. Darst,; Jqhn R. 
Tolar, Diocesan Chairman of the Finance Depart- 
ment, Rev. W. R. Noe, Executive Secretary of the 
Diocese, and Rev. George Gresham, chairman of the 
Board of Religious Education. Short reports were 
given by the clergy and laymen present. 

After the morning session a meeting of the Stand- 
ins' Committee of the Diocese, composed of, Rev, 
Messrs. Stephen Gardner, C. A. Ashby^ A. C. D.JNoe, 
and Messrs. John G. Bragaw,,. E. ,'R, Conger was. 
held to transact important digcesan business. . 

At the Woman's Auxiliary meeting, which was 
held in the Church,. Mrs, W. S, Carawan, President 
of the Convocation Qf-Edenton, presided... The ad- 
dress of welcome was given by Mrs. C. . >C. Hilton 
and the response was by -Mrs. C. J. Sawyer of. 
Windsor. ■■ , ...; 

, After the president had given her report of the 
year's work, she left a most interesting thought for 
each Tnember to take home, namely. "The impor- 
tance of every person in a parish attending Church 



School". She emphasized the fact that a wide- 
awake Church School means active members in ail 
organizations. , 

The district presidents making reports were : Mrs. 
G. S. V ought, Farmville, Mrs. Edward Douglas, 
Bath, Mis. Metrah Swindell, Swan Quarter, Miss 
Ida Peacock. Roper, Mrs. W. E, White, Hertford, 
Miss Effie Waldo, Hamilton, Mrs. William Nixon, 
Sunbury. Five minute talks were given by Diocesan 
Chairmen. Supply Work, Mrs. John Bonner; 
Church Periodical Club. Mrs. S. A. Ward ; Publicity, 
Mrs. W. A. Darden; Social Service, Mrs. J. E. F= 
Hicks; United Thank Offering, Miss Caroline Myers. 

Noon-day prayers were held by Bishop Darst, 
after which be spoke on the "Forward Movement". 
In his talk he referred to the honor that has recently 
come to our Diocesan President, Mrs. Fred Outland, 
in that she has been made National Chairman for 
Women in the Forward Movement work. The Dio- 
cese as a whole is rejoicing also that our Bishop has 
received recognition in the Province, when he was 
recently made President of the Province of Sewanee, 
at the Synod in Kentucky. 

Mrs. Outland 's address to the Auxiliary was, as 
usual, filled with inspiration to "Carry on". She 
spoke on "The Annual Program for Auxiliaries" 
and "The Forward Movement". 

Rev. Leon Malone addressed the, congregation on 
"The Forgotten Man in East Carolina" stressing 
the importance of Rural Work. .; 

Miss Elizabeth Andrew's spoke on "Student Work 
at East Carolina Teachers' College." 

The Ladies of St. Paul's Church served a delicious 
lunch to the visitors at the noon hour. 



MEETING OF CONVOCATION OF WILMINGTON 



1 By Mrs. A. C. D. Noe 

.The annual meeting of the Convocation of Wil- 
mingtoh was held at St. Mary's Episcopal Church, 
Kmston, November 6th. The session opened at 10 :00 
a., pi. with a celebration of, the Holy Communion., 
with the Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst, D. D. celebrant, 
assisted by the Rev. E-..W. Halleck, B. D., dean of 
the Convocation and the Rev. B. F. Huske, D. D., 
rector of the parish. 

One hundred and twenty-five delegates and guests 
registered, among whom were the following diocesan, 
officers. Bishop Darst, Dean Halleck, of St. John's 
Church, Wilmington, the Rev. W. R. Noe, Executive 
Secretary, the Rev. Alexander Miller of St. Paul's 
Church, Wilmington, chairman of the Field Depart- 
ment, the Rev. Georse.S. Gresham, of St, Stephen's 1 
Church, Goldsboro, .chairman of the Board of Reli- 
gious Education; John R. Tolar, of Fayettevilje, 
chairman of the Finance department; Mrs. Fred 



NOVEMBER, 1935 



11 



Outland, of Washington, president of the Woman's 
Auxiliary, Mrs. J. Q. Beckwith., of Lumberton, 
president of the Woman's Auxiliary of the Convoca- 
tion, Mrs. John E. F. Hicks, of Goldsboro, chairman 
of the Department of Christian Social Service in the 
Woman's Auxiliary; Mrs, John H. Bonner, of Wash- 
ington, chairman of the Supply Work Department ; 
.Mrs. W. A. Darden, of Greenville, Church Publicity 
chairman ; Mvs. Sidney Ward, of Plymouth, Church 
Periodical chairman; and Miss Caroline K. Myers, 
of Wilmington, United Thank Offering chairman. 

After the devotional service the men repaired to 
the parish house for their meeting and the Auxiliary 
remained in the Church for theirs. Dean Halleck 
presided at the men's meeting. Among the items of 
business was the election of officers. Dean Halleck 
was reelected for his seventh consecutive term of 
service and the Rev. Lawrence M>. Fenwick, of St. 
Paul's Church, Beaufort, was elected secretary-treas- 
urer. 

Inspirational talks were made by Bishop Darst, 
John R. Tolar, the Rev. Alexander Miller, the Rev. 
B. F. Huske and the Rev. W. R. Noe. 

Mrs. J. Q. Beckwith presided at the women's 
meeting in the Church. The address of welcome 
was given by Miss Steva Dodson and the response 
"by Mrs. David Mtirckison, of Wilmington. The 
president, after making her annual report, made a 
s'-ot talk on "Fellowship". Reports were made by 
the five district chairmen ; Mrs. Frank Challen, New 
Bern. Miss Mayme Whitfield. Seven Springs, Mrs. 
F. B. Johnson. Clinton; Mrs. S. L. Smith, Whitevi'lle : 
and Mrs William 0. James, Wilmington. 

Noon day prayers were said by Bishop Darst, after 
which he made a short talk on the privilege of ser- 
vice and sacrifice,, stressing the fact that "there muse 
he a sacrificial bridge of your life and mine over 
which others may walk to glory." Other speakers 
on the program were : Miss Elizabeth Andrews, the 
Hcv. J. Leon Malone, Miss Mary Graham, Miss Eliza- 
beth Griffin, Dr. B. F. Huske, Mrs. Fred Outland, 
Mrs. John E. F. Hicks, Mrs. John Bonner, Miss Caro- 
ine Myers. Mrs. W. A. Darden. Mrs. Sidney Ward. 

Signal honor has recently come to the state and 
diocese in the election of Bishop Darst as president 
of the Province of Sewanee, which comprises 18 
dioceses, Mrs. Fred Outland, diocesan president of 
the Woman's Auxiliary, has been made national 
chairman for women in the Forward Movement of 
the Episcopal Church, and Mrs. Henry J. McMillan. 
Wilmington, is president of the Synod for the Wo- 
man's Auxiliary in the Province of Sewanee. 

A delicious luncheon was served by the Woman's 
Auxiliary of St. Mary's Church, in the parish house 
at the noon hour. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON FINDINGS 
CONVOCATION OF WILMINGTON 



We. of your Findings Committee wish to express 
our appreciation for this splendid meeting, which 
by its large attendance denotes increased interest. 

We are very happy to have this opportunity to 
pay tribute to the fine inspirational leadership of 
our beloved Bishop Darst. It is a source of real 
gratification to the whole diocese to have him with 
us again in splendid health and with renewed vigor, 
after a very much needed vacation in Europe. 

We feel our diocese has been honored in the 
selection of Bishop Darst as President of the Synod, 
and we congratulate the Synod that they arc to 
have the benefit of his wise and able guidance. 

We find our leader, Mrs. J. Q. Beckwith possesses 
many qualities of spiritual leadership. Under her 
guidance the woman's work is being successfully 
carried on and her activities in behalf of their in- 
terests have been untiring. 

In the reports of the District Chairmen we find 
splendid signs of progress with all responsibilities 
met and "Discipleship" as their theme. 

We wish to congratulate the diocese upon their 
choice of Miss Elizabeth Andrews as Student Ad- 
visor at East Carolina Training School at Greenville. 
Her task of helping the girls there grow spiritually, 
intellectually and socially is indeed an important 
one. It deserves the interest and co-operation of 
every one in the diocese. 

In Rev. J. Leon Malone 's report on the rural 
work we find the "Forgotten Man of East Carolina" 
is being recognized, and the rural work now has 
a definite place in the activities of the Church. 

We are greatly pleased that some of the most 
capable women in our diocese are being recognized. 
Some have been selected for work for the Auxiliary 
of the Province. Others have been elevated to 
prominent positions including Mrs. MacMillan as 
President of the Woman's Auxiliary of the Province 
of Sewanee and Mrs. Fred Outland as Chairman of 
the Women's work in the "Forward Movement". 

We acknowledge our responsibility to the young 
people of the Church and feel very grateful to Miss 
Mary Graham for pointing out to us, the way in 
which we may be of real assistance to them. 

In the fine address of Miss Elizabeth Griffin, 
Missionary to the Philippines, we were given inter- 
esting information regarding the work of our Church 
there. We deplore the lack of sufficient funds for 
effectively carrying on this most important work 
and trust that this condition may be remedied in 
1he near future. 

We are always inspired by having with us our 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD 



Diocesan President. Mrs. Fred (Jutland. Her interest 
in the Avomen's work evidences such sincerity it 
makes each and every one of us very desirous of 
giving our best in going forward for God's Kingdom. 
Let us put forth our best effort to make the "For- 
ward Movement" a most successful one. 

We find the Chairmen of the various departments 
are giving themselves in unselfish service, and the 
different phases of their activities are showing 
splendid results. 

We commend the fine report of our efficient 
Secretary, Mrs. S. P. Adams, also the able services 
of Mr. Noe. 

This committee recommends a closer study of owe 
Church's program, and the messages of our diocesan 
officers, so we can render more effective co-opera- 
tion. We shoiild inform ourselves regarding every 
phase of the Church's activities, for lack of interest 
often comes from lack of knowledge. 
Respectfully submitted, 

GLADYS M. SITTERSON 
MARGARET I. LATIMER 
GETHAN POISSON 



THE FORGOTTEN MAN IN EAST CAROLINA 



(Leon Ma lone) 

About the beginning of this twentieth century 
there was a general movement of the American people 
toward the cities. But about five years ago the 
trend turned back in the other direction — toward 
Rural America. We find the people moving rapidly 
today toward the small towns and open country. 
In Winton, a town of less than 500 population in 
which I live eight new families have moved to town 
in the past: twelve months. In the nearby town 
every house is occupied, and in some cases there are 
two and three families living in houses that were 
built f or one family. 

There are reasons to believe that this settlement of 
the peoples is apt to be permanent. 

Therefore it is fitting that the Church concentrate 
on Rural work. 

There are other reasons for this emphasis on 
Rural work. 

1. The birth rate is higher in the rural sections, 
so the future citizens of our cities and country both 
are beinc trained there. We have seen, often, the 
value of the work of the Rural Church. We have 
a good example here in the diocese — St. Peter's 
Church, Washington!. N. C. A large per cent oO 
the communicants came there from Belhaven, Hvde 
County, Chocowinity. Zion. Vanceboro, etc. Dr. 
Brown, Rector of Calvary Church, Tarboro, tells of 



an experience he had once in Baltimore. He spoke 
in one of the Churches there one Sunday morning, 
and after the service thirteen of his former com- 
municants, from the rural Churches he served came 
up to greet him. They were living in Baltimore. 

2. Through the drift of the population many 
members of the Church have found themselves set- 
tled in communities where there is no work of the 
Church being carried on. The Church needs to ex- 
pand her efforts to reach these scattered members 
of the Church. 

6. The small Churches in the diocese need to be 
concentrated on and strengthened. We have 51 
parishes and missions with less than 100 communi- 
cants in each. These are planted in the small towns, 
the new community centers, along side of the con- 
solidated schools in East Carolina. These are the 
strategic places for the Church. 

Is the Church fitted for Rural Work? 

The question of the fitness of the Episcopal Church 
for the Rural work is often raised. 

Here are the six marks of "The Successful Coun- 
try Church" according to a survey made by Dr. 
John Brunner a few years ago : 

1. An educated Ministry. 2. A dignified, formal 
reverent worship. 3. The principle of a settled pas- 
torate. 4. A non-restricted attitude toward recre- 
ation and life. 5. The uniting of ethics and religion 
with life. 6. A genuine interest in the community. 

To me, this spells the Episcopal Church. 

The Church has these things and more. It has 
the Episcopal form of Church government, with the 
bishop as the head of a diocesan family of both city 
and rural people. It has historic continuity from 
the Apostles' times. It claims the Apostolic Sue- 
cession of its Ministers. It uses architectural de- 
signs and Church furnishnigs that are most condu- 
cive to worship. It observes the Christian year — 
that splendid system of Christian Nurture. It has 
the Book of Common Prayer, the Church's greatest 
and best missionary. It has 'the Altar, as the center 
of our devotions and the source of our spiritual 
power. 

Any one of these incidentally mentioned in the 
presence of non-Episcopalians might easily arouse 
their interest, and then we can teach them about 
the Church. 

Why is the Church failing in the Rural Work? 

Among the many reasons for the Church's failure 
in the Rural field, the following is perhaps the most 
pertinent. 

When the large number of people went to the 
cities the communicant strength of the Church seems 
to have sone with them. The Church established 



NOVEMBER, 1935 



13 



itself there and called in the best Clergyman, leaving 
the Rural Church to sink or hang on like a drowning 
man hangs to a straw. We have 27, or one third 
of the parishes and missions in the diocese, with less 
than 25 communicants — still "'hanging on". 

The Chinch became "citified". We got stuck up, 
superior, and we came to believe that the Episcopal 
Church is not suited to uneducated, uncultured, poor, 
and rural people. We forgot how to carry on the 
work of the Church in rural areas. 

However, some few years ago some of our people 
woke np to 'the situation, and a Rural Work Secre- 
tary was put under the Department of Christian 
Social Service. As a Rural man. I have always 
resented this misplacing of the responsibility. It 
should have been under the Department of Domestic 
Missions, where it was rightfully put by the last 
General Convention. We witness today a new in- 
terest in, a new emphasis upon, a more intelligent 
approach toward Rural work of the Church. 

The Rural work is the ''New Macedonia" to the 
Church in East Carolina. May we go to it, not con- 
descendingly, but humbly, penitently, prayerfully, 
studiously, and diligently proclaim the gospel o 
Jesus Christ as this Church has received the same. 

Once while Jesus walked the earth a man who 
was a leper met Him. Instead of crying out, "Un- 
clean, Unclean", he cried out, "If you will you can 
make me clean." 

He was afflicted with an incurable, contagious 
disease, and was asking Jesus to expose Himself to 
this dreaded disease by laying His hands upon him. 

We are living today in a sin-sick, broken, diseased 
world, that calls out to the Church to say, "If you 
will you can make me clean". 

Jesus laid His hands upon this man, not hands 
that contracted the dangerous disease, but hands 
that gave health, and life, and hope. 

In his example, we can find guidance to lead us 
in the right way; in His Spirit, power to go forward 
day by day. 



REV. HENRY F. KLOMAN ACCEPTS ST. 
MARY'S POST 



(Continued from page 3.) 
Bishop's Letter 

There is undoubtedly a new and hopeful spirit in 
the diocese generally, and I am happy to feel that 
our people have determined to go forward all along 
the line and, under the leadership of our Master 
Christ, take our full and rightful place in His plans 
for the extension of His Kingdom in East Carolina 
and in all the world. 

Faithfully and affectionately, 

Your friend and Bishop, 

THOMAS C. DARST 



The Rev. Henry Fletcher Kloman, 65-year-old min- 
ister of the Episcopal Church, has accepted the chap- 
laincy of St. Mary's School for the remainder of the 
school year. 

A. L Purrington, secretary of the St. Mary's tru-3 
tees, received Mr. Kloman 's acceptance yesterday. 
The new chaplain will begin his duties November 10 

Mr Kloman, veteran of the Church, succeeds the 
Rev. Joseph F. Fletcher, young minister who resigned 
last spring. 

The new chaplain's last charge was in Cumberland, 
Md. Since he graduated from the Virginia Theo- 
logical Seminary he has held charges in Baltimore 
and other Maryland cities, in Virginia, in Maine and 
in North Dakota, where he was dean of the Fargo 
Cathedral from 1916 to 1923. During the World War 
he served overseas as chaplain for the American Red 
Cross and now holds the rank of major and chaplain 
in the Officers' Reserve. 

During his career Mr. Kloman has taken consider- 
able part in the educational activities of his church. 
He was born in Warrenton, Va.. Mrs. Kloman was 
Miss Eleanor Marshall Trapnell of Charleston, W. Va. 
— News and Observer. 



AN APPRECIATION 



After a lone and beautiful life, a faithful and loyal 
member of the Woman's Auxiliary, Mrs. Jane Ire- 
dell Williams entered into life eternal on September 
8th. 

Of a happy, sunny disposition, a devoted wife and 
mother, loyal to friends and with an abiding faith 
she endeared herself to a large circle of friends. 

Mrs. Williams was deeply interested in many things 
which made hers a well-rounded life. She loved the 
beauty of nature, the trees and flowers especially and 
through this medium her love of art found expres- 
sion. 

Reared from her earliest years in an atmosphere 
of love for the Church she carried this early training 
with her all her life. 

With grateful hearts the Woman's Auxiliary de- 
sires to express their love and appreciation and their 
belief that such a life cannot die. "Blessed are the 
pure in heart for they shall see God." 

VIRGINIA LEE MILTON, 
ELIZABETH STONE STRANGE. 

Mrs Williams was the mother of Mrs. MacMillan, 
president of the Woman's Auxiliary of the Province 
of Sewanee. 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD 



GENERAL CHURCH 



Many new Bishops in the Anglican Communion 
within the past year. Among the most recent are 
three missionary bishops elected by the House of 
Bishops at Houston in November. 

Dean Kroll of Haiti, bishop-elect of Liberia. 

Bishop Reifsnider, suffragan of North Tokyo, to 
succeed Bishop McKim as Bishop of that district. 

Bishop Bartlett of North Dakota to become Bishop 
of Idaho ; A successor will not be elected for North 
Dakota until next yea]-. The narrow northern por- 
tion of Idaho has been added to the district of Spo- 
kane. 

The Rev. Vedder Van Dyck of Burligton, Ver- 
mont, is Bishop-Elect of Vermont. 

Dean Dagwell of Colorado, bishop-elect of Oregon. 

The Rev. Dr. Theorore R. Ludlow of South 
Orange, N. J., suffragan bishop-elect of Newark. 

Elsewhere among recent Anglican Bishops are a 
Chinese, an Indian, a Japanese. 

The Right Rev. Shau-tsang Mok, assistant bishop 
of Hongkong, completing his first year in January, 
1936. 

The Right Rev. Sisir Kumar Tarafdar. assistant 
bishop of Calcutta, third Indian bishop. 

The Right Rev. Paul Shinji Sasaki, bishop of Mid- 
Japan. When announcement of his election was 
made to the General Synod, "such a storm of ap- 
plause burst forth ns perhaps has never been known 
in the Japanese 'Church." 

Another Chinese, The Rigbit Rev. Lmdel Tser^ for- 
merly assistant in Honan, has become bishop of that 
diocese. 

Among new English missionary bishops nine are 
taking up their difficult work in fields that by their 
mere mention indicate the world-wide sweep of the 
Anglican Communion : Lee of Zululand ; Mann of 
South Japan; Howe-Browne Bloemfontein. South 
Africa ; Thompson, Iran (Persia) ; Elliott in Dorna- 
kal, South India, and West in Rangoon; Daly, Gam- 
bia and the Rio Pongas, a new West African diocese 
about four doors north of Liberia; Bullen assistant 
for Egypt and the Sudan, to work chiefly in the 
country of the Upper Nile, territorv that borders on 
Ethiopia. Two among the new bishops whose fields 
are less missionarv in character are MacKenzie of 
Brechin, in the Eniscopal Church of Scotland, and 
Carrington, of Quebec, at whose consecration Bishop 
McElwain assisted. 



A Buddhist priest, who said he had heard of me 
from a friend who lived in the villa next to his, 
came to see me and asked thait I come out and talk 
to Ids peonle on some subiect like ethics. He came 
from a village of the former oirtcastes, now equal 



before the law but still socially ostracized, and said 
that it was known as the poorest, most wretched 
village in the prefecture. 

My friend took me around, and it was a pretty 
sad sight, though I have seen dirtier children and 
frowsier women. But that visit really did help me 
to see more of what the problem of evangelizing 
rural Japan means. Someone must go there and 
live among those people. I have often wished I 
were young again, but this time I wanted to be a 
Japanese as well, for the field seemed to be prepared. 

I talked with my friend about it, and though he 
is not a professing Christian his statement was, 
"Such a man working here could Christianize not 
only this village but all those around here." 

As I said, this man is not a Christian, but even 
though he has not heard a sermon or been to church 
in years. I found him with a New Testament in 
front of him when f walked in on him unawares, the 
other day. I wonder if we realize all that that 
means, his holding on to his imperfect faith out 
there alone all these years, and also doing his best 
to help these other poor people in the next village. — 
(Rev.) P. A. Smith, Hikone, Japan. Mr. Smith 
went to Japan in 1912. 



An unnamed English writer in the Autumn issue 
of the Cathedral Age describes the Archbishop of 
York, and a most winsome figure he appears to be. 
Everyone who can will want to hear him during 
his visit to the United States. Watch the Church 
papers for notices of his broadcast, engagements, etc. 



A Chinese Bible woman, Liu Hsiao-chen, who has 
been doing fine work for the past five years in the 
Rev. John Magee's parish at Hsiakwan, diocese of 
Shanghai, living happily and comfortably with 
Louise Hammond, has felt called to give up all that 
and go to harder work in primitive conditions in the 
missionary district of Shensi, under Bishop Shen. 



The Christian, slight though his individual influ- 
ence may be, must continually work to rid the world 
of the scourge of war by setting up ana following 
Christian standards in the home, the school, the 
community and the nation, and he must, to those 
ends, use not only his heart but his mind. — Kenneth 
C, M. Sills. 



How many domestic missionaries still travel about 
their rural fields with a horse and buggv? Char- 
lotte Edwards of the Blue Ridge Archdeaconry, 
Virginia, believes she is the only one in that district 
but no doubt there are others elsewhere, and horse- 
back riders as well. Inaccessible mountain homes 
and rockv roads are the reason. 



NOVEMBER. 1935 



15 



<TH£ FINANCIAL efTATEMEMT 



PLEASE READ IT CAREFULLY. 

WHERE DOES YOUR PARISH OR MISSION STAND IN THE 
LIST? It is a matter that ought to concern every INDIVIDUAL 
CHUx^CHMAN ! 

"EXPECTANCY" is the amount that your parish or mission has 
reported to us for 1935, based on pledges of individuals and other 
sources. 

Parishes and Missions have been asked to pay in full, if possible, or to catch up in 
their payments by the first of December. 

The list will show that quite a number have already paid in full for the year, and 
that other parishes and missions are paid to the first of December. 

REGULAR PAYMENTS ARE NEEDED TO PAY OBLIGATIONS WHICH COME 
REGULARLY. 



STATEMENT OF THE UIOl'STS PAID BY THE PARISHES A\D MISSIONS FOR DIOCESAN AND GENERAL, 

CHURCH WORK, JANUAHY 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1935, 



Paris'' es 

Beaufort, St. Paul's 

Clinton. St. Paul's •■•• 

Fayetteville, St. John's 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 

Hope Mills, Chi-isi Cnurch.. . . .. 

Kinston, St. Mary's 

New Bern, Christ Church 

Red Springs, St. Stephen's .. . 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents .. 

Soutiipurt, Si.. Phaip's 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd 

' AVilmington, St. James' 

Wilmington St. John's 

Wilmington, St. Paul's 

Organized Miss'ons. 

Burgaw, St. Mary's 

Faison, St. Gabriel's 



Parishes 

Aurora, Holy Cross 

Ayden, St. James' 

Bath, St. Thomas' ..■••• 

Belhaven, St. James' 

Bonnerton, St. John's 

Chocowimty. Trinity 

Columbia, St. Andrew's 

Creswell, St. David's 

ronton, St. Paul's 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church 

Parmville, Emmanuel 

Gatesville, St. Mary's 

Greenville,. St Paul's 

Crifton, St. John's 

Hampton, St. Martin's 

Hertford, Holy Trinity ...... 

Jessama, Zion 

Lake I.rnding. St. George's .. 

Plymouth, Grace Church 

Riper, St. Luke's 

Washington, St Peter's 

Williamston, Advent 



CONVOCATION OF WILMINGTON. 



Parishes 

Fayetteville, St. Joseph's 
New Bern, St. Cyprian's . . 
Wilmington, St. Mark's . 



Organized Missions 

Belhaven. St. Marv's 

Fdenton. St. John-Evangelist 
Fiftieth C ; ty, St. Phi'ip's .. 

Goldsboro. St. Andrew's 

Kinston, St. Augustine's 
Washington, St. Paul's 



Expec- 


Paid to 


tations 


Nov. —1 


365.20 


$ 95.05 


50.00 


50.00 


2,150 00 


1,007.26 


1.000.00 


331.01 


60.00 


42.50 


1.000.0C 


750.U0 


2.125.00 


1,086.69 


55. 0j 


48 00 


200 00 


93.13 


109.60 


132. OS 


37.. 40 


261.71 


9 781.50 


6,924.09 


2,031.60 


1,474.58 


1,200.00 


468.61 


35.00 


18.72 


65.00 


59.00 


CONVOCATIO 


250.00 


99.98 


300.JO 




35.00 


20.42 


250.00 


33. 'i6 


100 00 


57.43 


100.00 




200.00 


150.00 


300.00 


141.50 


1,559 80 


1,100.00 


1,008.76 


77S.22 


238.20 


169 10 


12S.00 


22.03 


1.356 2i 


5,157.45 


200 00 


8.10 


155.00 


50 00 


4no nn 


241.07 


1 on nn 


62.50 


2nn n n 


56.30 


2nn "0 


155 00 


75 00 


58.30 


1,500.00 


1,375.65 


100.00 


111.19 


LOCATION 


OF COLO 


104.00 


55 50 


420 nn 


315.00 


140.00 


121.18 


105.00 


33 VZ 


1"' "■• 


74.72 


20.15 


1 > - n 


pn "n 


44.99 


75 "0 


75.00 


120.00 


30.36 



Lumberton, Trinity 

North West, "All Sou''s 

Pikevi le. St. George's 
Trenton. Grace Church 

Vanceboro, St. Paul's 

Whiteville, Grace Church . . 
Wrightsville, St. Andrews 



Unorganized Missions. 

Jasper, St. Thomas' 

Pollocksville, Mission 

Wilmington, Delgado Mission 



Exnev- 

talii»n> 

174.00 

10.00 

20.00 

15 00 

30.00 

100.00 

6.00 



20.00 
20.00 
10.00 



Parochial Missions. 

Campbellton. St. Philip's . . 
Tolar-Hart, Good Shepherd 



Total 



Windsor, St Thomas'..., 

Winton, St. John's 

Woodviile, Grace Church 



Organized Missions 

Ahosk'.e St. Thomas' 

Fairfield, All Saints' 

Murf reesboro, St. Barnabas' 

Roxobel St. Mark's 

Sladesville, St. John's 
Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' . 
Sunbury, St. Peter's ..... 
Swrn Quarter, Calvary ... 
Winterville, St. Luke's . . 
Yeatesville, St. Matthew's 

Unorganized Missions. 

Avoca, Holy Innocents' . 
Camden, St. Joseph's 



Total 

Grand Total 



Paid to 
Nov. «1 

H2.ro 

5.04 
20.00 
11.50 
22 00 
50.00 

6.00 



15.00 



8.37 
72.68 



21,159.30 


$13,165.02 


225.00 


132.03 


lUO.U" 


48.77 


150.00 


150.00 


55.00 




10.00 


8.00 


30. o i 


25.00 


9"> 0<: 


85.55 


10.00 




100. on 


50 00 


42.00 


35 98 


20.00 


10 75 


125.00 


125.00 


20.00 


20.00 


80.00 


28.80 


10.00 


5.00 



Total $ 9,735.04 ? 6,579.43 



Unorganized Missions. 

Aurora, St. Jude's 

Beaufort, St. Clement's 

nreenville, St. Andrew's .... ... 

Haddock's Cross Roads, St. Stephen's 

Rnner. St. Ann's 

Wilmington, "Brooklyn" Misrion... 
Wrightsville, St. Augustine's 



43.00 


5.00 


40 nil 


30 30 


30.00 


9.1)0 


30. on 


21.50 


26.00 


4.00 


20.00 


13.50 


20.00 


13.50 


$ 1,354.15 


$ 861.37 


? 32.248i.49 


$20,60.5.82 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD 



♦ 



VIRGINIA EPISCOPAL 
SCHOOL 

LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 

Prepares boys for College and University. Splen- 
did environment and excellent corps of teachers. 
High standard in scholarship and athletics. Healthy 
and beautiful location in the mountains of Virginia. 
Charges exceptionally low. For catalog apply to: 

REV. OSCAR deWOLF RANDOLPH 

RECTOR . 



I I 
I I 



4 " — - 



McCONNELL & CAUSEY 

FOR SERVICE 
Good-Year Tires Exide Batteries 

Quaker State Lubrication 

Telephone 827 12th and Market Sts 

Wilmington, N. C. 



■ 



4. 




AMUSINQ PASTIMES FOR CHILDREN AND ADULTS 

PARTIES ™L R V A ; N S CS SOCIALS 



The Authors have carefully eliminated anything 
that might offend persons of any age and have 
avoided incorporating any game which might develop 
unnecessary roiughness and rowdyiim. 

Special Order Form HJB 

J. B. Lippincott Company, 
227 South Sixth Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Dear Sirs: 

You may send to the address below cop 

of the New Games and Stunts Book, Price one dollar 
a coipy. 



Remittance enclosed $ 



Will pay postman $. 
Name 



Address 
M. H. 



ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Conducted for Negro Youth under the auspices of the Epis- 
copal Church. 

A four year accredited College Course is offered, leading to 
degrees of B. A. and B. S., including Pre-Medical work and 
Teacher Training for State High School Teachers' certificates. 

A College Preparatory Department, Training School for Nurses 
and School for Religious and Social Workers are connected with 
the College. 

Thorough training, healthy environment. Christian influences. 
For Catalog and information write — 

The Registrar 
ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE, RALEIGH, N. C. 



FOR ALL COLDS USE 

VAPOR SALVE ■ - 25c 
NOSE AND THROAT DROPS 35c 

MANUFACTURED BY 

FLURENE CHEMICALS, Ltd. 

Washington, North Carolina 




I Washing 






4-PLY CROCHET YARN 
50c PER POUND 

WRITE US FOR SPECIAL CLUB 
RATES IN 50-LB. LOTS 

TOLAR, HART & HOLT MILLS 

FAYETTEVILLE, N. 0. 



+ — — ... 



Meares Insurance Agency 

108 Princess Street 
Wilmington, N. C. 



+ 



*— — - 



— * 



I SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 
JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

An Episcopal School for girls — Have your daughter 
receive her education in a church school. 

Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, B. S., 
Principal 

Saint Mary's offers 4 years' High School and 2 
years' College work all fully accredited by the South- 
ern Association. Also courses in Music, Art, Ex- 
pression, Home Economics, and Business. 

20-Acre Campus. Gym and Field Sports. Tennis. 
Indoor Tiled Swimming Pool. Horseback 
Riding:. Golf 

A. W. TUCKER, Business Manager. 



+ -■■ 



-><&v 



^ 



& i*^ 



Jan. 36 

Library, u. ST. c. 

Chapel Hill, N. C, 









/\ 



o 





Xrt^tra-l^t-titarftfi^au-camflRe^^iiy 



CFTRTSTMAS is not merely the anni- 
versary of the' birth of a person, it is 
the outbreak into reality of a new life. 
It' is not enough' to say that on that first 
Christ mas Day the historical character, 
'Jesus Christ, was' born. For His' birth 
was n6t simply that of a person, it was 
the' beginning on earth and' in humani- 
'ty-of aiinew:and( continuing thing, the 
Christian . life. — Rev. D. A. McGregor, 
Th. D. 




DECEMBER, B35 







THE MISSION HERALD 



BODY SNATCHING 



This is an unpleasant story but one to keep in 
mind for the next critic of missionary work who 
says, "Why disturb the people? Their own religion 
is best for them." 

The Rev. Vincent H. Gowen of St. Anne's Mission, 
Besao, Philippine Islands, writes in the Diocesan 
Chronicle : 

Body-snatching is one of the less profitable avo- 
cations of a priest in Besao. In his cateehist and 
teachers he has, of course, his corps of assistant 
body-snatchers who perform the forensic duties es- 
sential to getting Christian burial for the bodies of 
our dead, but in some cases the direct interposition 
of the priest is necessary. Almost without excep- 
tion, every funeral still involves a battle of words. 
A few years ago we thought, the victory was won. 
With the old men of this district, however, victory 
is never won, because their minds are not answerable 
to logic or to any orderly sequences of thought. 

They still move in a primitive, unscientific, magi- 
cal world And in times of crisis such ideas 

as they have are so strongly tinctured with the 
fumes of the rice-spirits that one's only argument, 
must be firm assertion of authority tactfully blended 
with humor. 

A case in point was a funeral we had in a drizzly 
interval between two of our recent typhoons. A 
woman had been drowned crossing a stream and her 
body recovered the next day. After perhaps ten 
hours of debate our lay worker, Robert Pekas; was 
able to notify the priest that the funeral would be 
held at St. Anne's Church at three o'clock. But 
the priest, when he pot to the church, found nobody. 
Showers, prelude of the next typhoon, had begun 
and the bereaved fanrly had been persuaded by their 
wrinkled counsellors that it was unlucky to bury a 
drowned person in the rain. 

First. Mr. Pekas brought this message; next, a 
delegat ; on accompanied him to stress the awful con- 
sequences of such an act. In this colloquy Mr. 
Pekas rather rashly avowed his willingness to ac- 
cept the consequences. Finally, the priest in cas- 
sock and black stole went down to the hut where 
the body lay in putrescent state. Here he found a 
group of old men, all drunk and prepared to talk 
endlessly and without the slightest relevance to the 
issue in hand. 

In the end a mass appeal to their consciences — 
more accurately, to the superstitious side of their 
consciences — caused the funeral to be held, and per- 
haps the imcomfortable threat of having the priest 
with them all night. One envies earlier mission- 
aries their sincere use of hell-fire in dealing with prim. 



itive people ; it is a handicap to try instilling the in- 
centive of love in minds responsive only to fear. It 
tempts one to use short-cuts; but short cuts, no mat- 
ter how immediatey effective they may seem, replace 
backward savages with bribed or intimidated Christ- 
ians — and the last state is worse than the first. 

It would have been interesting to have seen what 
would have happened if we had not intervened ; the 
rains continued solidly for the next five days. One 
wonders if even noses so inured to decomposition as 
the Igorot nose could have stood that wait. 

But the old men consider that theirs, after all, was 
the victory. Robert Pekas, who had boasted his 
readiness to brave the bad luck, took sick that same 
evening and was ill for several days. There was 
nothing very much the matter with him ; his ailment 
was perhaps three parts fear. This, nevertheless, 
was sufficient vindication of a superstition! 

Superstition we have always with us The 

immense potency of evil suggeston on the mind is 
illustrated at a thousand turns. People who deplore 
our interference with the simple idyllic life of the 
noble savage should live for a time in an Igorot 
village ; they woidd understand the aptness of the 
phrase, "the people that walked in darkness," and 
the insistent passion of the vocation which would 
enable them to see "a great light." 



WHAT IS CHRISTIANITY? 



"In the home it is kindness. 
In business it is honesty. ■>" 

In society it is helpfulness. 
In work it is fairness. 

Toward the unfortunate it is the helping hand. 
Toward the weak it is burden-bearing. 
Toward the wicked it is evangelism. 
Toward the strong it is trust. 
Toward the penitent it is forgiveness. 
Toward ourselves it is self-control. 
Toward God it is reverence, worship and Love. 
And the foundation stone, the undergirding motive 
of all the motives, is the Spirit of Christ." 

— Southern Churchman 



CHURCH KALENDAR 



January, 1936 



1. Circumcision White 

5. Second Sunday after Christmas White 

6. Epiphany White 

12. First Sunday after Epiphany White 

19. Second Sunday after Epiphany Green 

25. Conversion of St. Paul White 

26. Third Sunday after Epiphany Green 



The Mission Herald 



VOLUME XLIX 



WILMINGTON, N. C, DECEMBER, 1935 



NUMBER 12 



BISHOP'S LETTER 



As the last issue of the Mission Herald did not 
come out until the last of November, I have very 
little to report in the way of activities in this issue. 

On Friday, November the twenty-second, I had 
the privilege of conducting the devotional hour at 
the Annual meeting of the Methodist Conference m 
Wilmington, and enjoyed being with Bishop Kern 
and the fine body of clergymen and laymen who 
made up the conference. 

On Sunday, the twenty-fourth, at eleven A. M. I 
preached, confirmed four persons presented by the 
Rev. A. C. D. Noe, and celebrated Holy Communion 
in St. John's Church, Pitt County. 

In the afternoon I preached in St. Luke's, Winter- 
ville, and at night I preached and confirmed one 
person, presented by the Rev. A. C. D. Noe, in St. 
James' Church, Ayden. 

On the night of November the twenty-sixth, I 
made an address at a fine, helpful parish dinner 
meeting at St. John's, Fayetteville. 

On Sunday, December the first, at the morning 
service, I preached, confirmed eight persons, pre- 
sented by the Rev. C. A. Ashby, and celebrated 
Holy Communion in St. Paul's Church, Edenton. 

In the evening I preached and confirmed six 
persons, presented by the Rev. S. N. Griffith, in St. 
John-1 he-Evangelist Church. Edenton. 

On Tuesday night, the third, I preached and con- 
firmed four persons, presented by the Rev. Howard 
Alligood, in St. Philip's Church, Campbellton, Fay- 
etteville. 

On the morning of the fourth, accompanied by 
Mr. Alligood, I went, to 'the Sanatorium in Hoke 
County, where we visited a number of patients from 
East Carolina and other places. 

On the night of the fourth, I preached and con- 
firmed one person, presented by Mr. Alligood in the 
Church of the Good Shepherd, Tolar Hart Village, 
Fayetteville. 

This letter is being written on the morning of 
the sixth and I am leaving shortly for New Born 
where I will make an address at the annual parish 
dinner of Christ Church tonight. 

My engagements for the remainder of the month 
will keep me quite busy, as they include : 

Holy Trinity Church. Hertford; St. Philip's. Eliza- 
beth City: Christ Church, Elizabeth City, St. Mark's 
Church, Wilmington ; St. Peter's Church, Washing- 
ton; St. Paul's Church, Vanceboro; St. Paul's 
Church, Washington ; St. Stephen's Church, Golds- 



boro; St. Mary's Church, Kinston; St. Andrew's 
Church, Wrightsville and the mission at Delgado 
Mills, Wilmington. 

We are drawing to the close of another year and 
I hope we have a right to feel that we have made 
real progress in our own lives, in our parishes and 
in our diocese. Soon we will enter upon a new year 
of opportunity and service. God grant that we, with 
the glad music of the 'Christmas song ringing in 
our hearts may take into the new year that faith 
and courage and loving service which belongs to 
those who know that they may walk with Emmanuel 
— God with us — through all the coming days. 

With loving greetings for the Christmas Season, 
1 am 

Faithfully and affectionately 
' Your friend and Bishop 

THOMAS C. DARST 



THE BISHOP'S PENCE PLAN 



During the year, offerings have been received 
from the following parishes and missions: 

Convocation of Wilmington: Beaufort, St. Paul's; 
Goldsboro, St. Stephen's; Southport, St. Philip's; 
Wilmington, Good Shepherd; Lumberton, Trinity; 
North West, All Souls' and Wrightsville, St. 
Andrew's. 

Convocation of Edenton: Aurora, Holy Cross; 
Ayden, St. James': Belhaven, St. James'; Bonnerton, 
St. John's: Columbia, St. Andrew's; Creswell, St. 
David's: Elizabeth City, Christ Church; Farmville, 
Emmanuel; Gatesville, St. Mary's; Greenville, St. 
Paul's; Hamilton, St. Martin's; Washington, St, 
Peter's; Wilb'amston, Advent; Windsor, St. Thomas'; 
Winton. St. John's; Woodville, Grace Church; Mur- 
freesboro, St. Barnabas'; Roxobel, St. Mark's; Sua- 
bury, St. Peter's; Yeatesville, St. Matthew's, and 
A.voea, Holy Innocents. 

Convocation of Colored Church Workers : Fayette- 
ville. St. Joseph's ; Wilmington, St. Mark's ; Belhaven, 
St. Mary's; Edenton. St. John-the Evangelist; Eliza- 
beth City. St. Philip's; Goldsboro, St. Andrew's; Kin- 
ston, St. Augustine's: Washington, St. Paul's; Au- 
rora, St. Jude's; Beaufort, St. Clement's and Roper, 
St. Ann's. , 

There are other parishes and missions that ordered 
the Pence Cans, and are doubtless using them. We 
hope that they will send in their reports on the 
offering in time for us to publish before the end of 
the year, a complete list of the parishes and missions 
lisine the Pence Plan. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



A Christmas Message 



P*fr, C. <&. JVshbg 



(Saoit Kill Souiarfr iien 



Christmas Day is set apart for celebrating the the cynical attitude that is begotten of a wrong 

birth of Jesus. As celebrated by many of us, this prospective of one of the gladdest holidays of the 

fact is forgotten, and the birth of the Saviour has yeai ' 

. Real values should take precedence. The love 

no part in the keeping of the day. We neither . , . 

of the family circle, the joy of little children, the 

watch with the shepherds, nor sing with the angels. . . 

w " u * ' friendships that have meant so much to us, the 

We now set forth the testimony of the human reeolleetion of ftoge now g(me> who mingled witll 

heart to the universal blessings which have been 11S their happiness this day in past years. Then too, 

given man by the birth of one child. Generation tho com f ort am ] privileges of Christ's Holy Church 

after generation we have been fed by the words, must ] 3e ^>l i'ificcl in our eyes, as "Christ loved the 

the life, the death, the resurrection of Jesus, until c h ure h, and o avo Himself for it". 

We have in the very texture of our nature an ap- ^ od poured f ort h t ] ie fulness of His own life into 

preciation of Him which is glorious indeed. This j esnSj t i iat He might walk, and talk, and live with 

we should not have if Jesus had not been born. men 

In Jesus' there was vast love, and a supreme intent Dr Charles E. Jefferson wrote that Christmas is 
on doing good. He impresses as absolutely obedient not a daV; it is a mood \y e celebrate it Friday, 
to Cod's will which means good will to all. He Saturday, Sunday, any day of the week. Christ- 
possessed a boundless peace, and He spread peace mag ; s indifferent to days. It has nothing to da 
through the hearts of others. He came to establish w j t h t ] :e almanac. Tt has nothing to do with place, 
good will among men. It is independent of geography, as it is of chro- 

We will read again the beautiful account of that no logy. Christmas is a spiritual creation, and he- 
marvelous birth folmd in the Cospels, and seek to longs to the kingdom of the heart. It is constructed 
enter into the real spirit of Christmas. It is the | )v the angels of the heart of a child, 
explanation of His character and mission; it gives ^re you willing to remember the old and friend- 
tfie philosophy of the christian life. Christmas is J egS) to put all thought of what you will get out 
to make us men of good will. of your mind, and think what you will give? To 

Christmas should not be a time of strain and try to make good will a larger feature in your life? 
hurry, that will give a sense of relief when it is To help quicken the impulses which make the ex- 
over; nor of perfunctory and compulsory giving, pcriences of men better? To remember that Jesus 
perhaps beyond our means that we may keep up continues today to be the best friend and leader 
with others; nor of sensuous pleasures, in a frantic f the human race? If so, Christmas will be a 
effort to have a good time, cost what it may; nor gracious and hallowed time for you. 



DECEMBER, 1935 



ADDRESS BROADCAST BY THE ARCHBISHOP 

OF YORK FROM WASHINGTON, D. C, ON 

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8th. 



It is a wonderful privilege that I should be allowed 
at the very outset of my visit to speak in this way to 
multitudes of the citizens of the United States, and I 
must preface what I say by an expession of gratitude 
for this opportunity. 

I am happy to number among my pei*sonal friends 
many Americans, and I have paid one very short pre- 
vious visit to the States. In this way I have been 
led to a conviction which I desire to express at the 
outset. For I began by making the mistake frequent 
among my fellow-countrymen of supposing that 
American and British folk are really parts of one na- 
tion who happen to have become politically separa- 
ted. Those who from either side of the Atlantic start 
with that assumption are bound to be dissapointed as 
the differences disclose themselves — differences of 
sentiment, of policy and of aspiration. Each is look- 
ing for what he does not find. For, of course, the 
plain fact is that history has led to the development 
of widely divergent types on the two sides of the 
Atlantic : and the way of wisdom is to assume not 
identity but difference. Then, if we meet each other 
as heirs of different and indeed divergent traditions, 
we shall be surprised and delighted at the perpetually 
fresh discovery of common elements in our tradition 
received from the past, and common hopes in our 
outlook as we prepare for the future. 

The fact that we can understand each other with- 
out having recourse to any foreign language, gives us 
an opportunity for mutual appreciation greater than 
any other two nations possess. And therein at once 
lies part of the special service which we are called 
upon to render to mankind. For the way of welfare 
and peace is the way of mutual appreciation. Peace 
and good-will can never come merely through those 
things wherein men are all alike: These are in any 
case the source of agreement ; and good will that 
rests on these alone will not survive the irritation 
due to variety and difference. If peace and good- 
will are to be secure, it must be because the differ- 
ences between us have themselves become the bonds 
that hold us together. 

It is worthwhile to consider what are the forces 
that specially bring men into contact with one anoth- 
er across all national boundaries, and how far these 
are a source of friction or of harmony. The chief is 
commerce ; and this works both ways. Commerce is 
one of those activities of mankind that has about it a 
sort of natural paradox. Its method is one that tends 
to obscure its true nature, for its true nature is mu- 
tual benefit. The exchange of goods should be to the 
benefit of both parties. In its simplest form it is, on 



each side of the exchange, a disposal of unwanted 
surplus in return for something needed; and how- 
ever complicated its organization becomes, that re- 
mains its essential principle. Moreover, as far as 
commerce is healthy, it is benefiicial to all concerned 
in it. But in the process of exchange each party is 
likely to be thinking more of his own needs than of 
the others. Consequently there arises some rivalry 
between them ; each is trying to buy cheap and sell 
dear. And when the commercial system is highly 
complicated, and there is little personal intercourse 
between those who direct the two sides of an ex- 
change — or rather, the variety of interests concerned 
in the exchange — all sense of partnership in a pro- 
cess of mutual benefit is likely to disappear, and a 
sense of unrelieved rivalry to take its place. The 
method of commerce has then obscured its true na- 
ture ; men have become so absorbed in the way in 
which they conduct it, that they forget what it really 
is. 

The answer to the question whether commerce pro- 
motes rivalry or good-will is the same as the answer 
to the question whether men are thinking most about 
its method or most about its nature ; for its method is 
likely to be a source of friction, while its nature is a 
source of good-will. 

We sometimes hear reformers say that business 
ought to be not competition for private profit but co- 
operation for public service. That is not the wisest 
way of putting the matter; and Christians, more than 
other people, will be anxious to avoid it. For Christ- 
ians will remember that the reality of anything what- 
ever must be what that thing is in the mind of Christ. 
It must be as He conceived it, because He is the agent 
of Creation. No Christian who pauses to reflect can 
ever regard our Lord as one who points to visionary 
ideals. His is the mind which perfectly and truly 
apprehends Reality. That is why He can say that to 
follow His teaching is to build upon a rock. So it is 
here. Modern business often looks like a huge sys- 
tem — or chaos — of competition for private profit ; but 
it never really is that ; it always is cooperation for 
public service. It is for public service, because if no 
one wants the product there will be no purchasers, no 
purchase price, no wages and no profits. Except in- 
sofar as it serves the public, business cannot go on at 
all. 

Similarly, business is conducted by the cooperation 
of multitudes of people; some supplying labour of 
various types, some managerial skill, some capital; 
and if any one of these is withdrawn, the process 
stops. Except so far as it is cooperative business 
cannot go on at all. But it could go on without any 
profit. It is already, always, and inevitably coop- 
eration for public service, and it is not in its own na- 
ture competition for private profit. It always is the 



THE MISSION HERALD 



thing that reform ers sometimes say they want it to 
become. It is not its own nature that is wrong, but 
the way we treat it. We have become so obsessed 
with its method as to forget its real nature. 

And of course, if you treat as competition for pri- 
vate profit what really is cooperation for public ser- 
vice, something is likely to go wrong with it. We 
have here an illustration of a universal principle. God 
is the source of all good things, economic goods as 
much as any others ; and He means us to enjoy them 
to the utmost. The commerce which enables men to 
enjoy them more fully, is in accordance with His will ; 
and if we treat it as what it is, a great system of co- 
operation for the general benefit, it will generate 
good-will. But if we are self-centered — which is the 
essence of all sin — and attend chiefly to our own 
share or interest in it, converting it into competition 
for private profit, it is bound to go wrong in its own 
working and to promote rivalries and enmities. But 
this comes, not from the nature of commerce but from 
our sinful way of conducting it. 

It is perhaps worth while, for avoidance of mis- 
understanding, to point out that cooperation does not 
in practice exclude competition altogether; and in 
urging that industry and commerce should be con- 
ducted in a cooperative spirit, I am not demanding 
the elimination of competition. Consider any team- 
game. The players join in the game for the pleasure 
which all share; the aim is cooperative. The way 
in which they promote that cooperative aim is for one 
team to compete against the other. If the two prin- 
ciples can be inter-twined like that in a mere game, 
it is not to be supposed that a combination of them 
is impossible in real life. But it makes all the dif- 
ference which of the two is uppermost and which, in 
the last resort, checks and controls the other. If the 
cooperative spirit is in control, you have good sports- 
men who would rather be beaten in a good game than 
win in a walk-over; if the competitive spirit is up- 
permost, you have players who play to win and who 
will do any dirty trick that the referee will permit. 
It is quite easy to apply this parable to the affairs of 
life. 

Commerce then is one of the factors that bring na- 
tions together. Whether in doing so it promotes 
good-will or ill-will depends on whether we conduct 
it rightly or sinfully. In fact, of course, our conduct 
of thisv as of all other human affairs, is a mixture of 
Tightness and sin. But there is no doubt where lies 
the way of remedy or salvation. 

Another great international activity is Science. 
Here national characteristics count for least. The pro- 
gress of Science is a vast cooperative enterprise rest- 
ing on those qualities of the human mind which vary 
least as between the different nations and races. An 
experiment accurately carried out and observed in a 



laboratory of Moscow or Berlin is valid for Paris, 
London or New York, unless variety of climatic con- 
ditions affect it. So far as it goes, Science generates 
fellowship. But it is not very potent in this, because 
it does not draw upon, and therefore does not har- 
monize, those differences of sentiment and outlook 
which lead to strife 

Art in its various branches is a greater power than 
Science. For Art does spring from nationally char- 
acteristic attitudes of mind, and is able so to present 
these as to illustrate their value. Shakespeare and 
Browning could only have appeared in England, 
Goethe only in Germany ; Dostoievsky only in Russia ; 
and all of us are the richer for their works. As we 
read these, we see each country in its characteristic 
excellence. We learn from the writers of other na- 
tions what we could never have learned from those 
of our own; all are the better for this rich variety, 
and we rejoice that other nations are so different 
from ourselves. In that mutual appreciation, the 
foundations of real good will may be laid, because 
the differences that tend to set us at variance are be- 
come the bond of our fellowship. 

Yet even this does not touch the heart of the mat- 
ter. For at bottom our differences arise from that 
sin or self-centeredness which is characteristic of all 
men from birth, complicated by divergence in our 
standard of admiration and judgment. There is no 
hope of solving many of the most difficult of our 
problems until at least we all agree to submit to ono 
standard of judgment. We may fail to conform our 
lives to the standard which we accept. But this is a 
small matter and the conflicts arising from such a 
failure are : in principle at least, capable of adjust- 
ment. But if one admires conduct which another cen- 
sures, no adjustment is possible. The world's most 
urgent need, now that it is welded by the scientific 
conquest of distance into a single community is a 
single and universally accepted standard of moral 
judgment, by which all nations agree that their ac- 
tions shall be approved or condemned. 

But what possibility is there that out of the welter 
of diverse traditions and cultures, which men have 
made for themselves, any such agreement can be 
built up? There is no hope whatever that this chief 
need of our world can be met unless there is indeed a 
Father of all mankind, whose will includes the wel- 
fare of all His children, and who has made His char- 
acter known to men — unless, in short, there is a Di- 
vine Revelation. The Gospel of Jesus Christ is offer- 
ed as precisely that Revelation ; and those who have 
made sincere trial of it have found that it vindicates 
its claim. 

Here is the source of hope for the world in our gen- 
eration as in every generation that has gone before 
us. It is true concerning this world, as concerning 



DECEMBER, 1935 



the next, that there is none other Name under heaven 
wherein we must be saved, but. that of Jesus Christ, in 
whom is seen the very nature of God, and His will 
for man. 

I am glad, therefore, that at this anxious time I 
am come here, not chiefly as a representative of 
England, not of the English branch of the Catholic 
Church, but as a minister of the universal Gospel and 
of the Catholic Church itself. We have our national 
characteristics ; and if only we have good-will we can 
rejoice in all of them. But that good-will itself will 
not be established so securely as to survive the fric- 
tions and tensions of modern life, unless we are unit- 
ed in a common submission to one throne of Judg- 
ment, and seek to guide our lives by reference to that 
one and only purpose which embraces the welfare of 
all — the purpose of the love of God. 

And this we cannot do for ourselves. Nothing 
is so surprising as man's pathetic belief that he can 
by the action of his own will, determine the direction 
of his own life. History and experience are one long 
refutation of that belief; yet men obstinately cling to 
it. They will not admit the fact which the Christian 
Church calls Original Sin, or allow for its conse- 
quences. Yet the fact remains. We are born self- 
centered, and we cannot lift ourselves off that centre 
of self and reorganize our nature on some other plan. 
We can indeed widen the circle of which each is 
centre. I can escape from narrow concern for myself 
to concern for my family, or my nation, or even my 
race, but it will still be "my" something. And that 
is sin — the very essence of sin. For the true centre 
of the world is God. Unless we can really learn not 
only to think but to feel that we are, as it were, plan- 
ets revolving about Him. we cannot exercise a right 
judgment. That is something we cannot attain by our- 
selves; all we can do is to submit ourselves to the 
forces which can bring about a change in us. 

In other words, the supply of our most vital want 
is to be found through faith and worship : — faith, not 
as a torpid acquiescence in some theological proposi- 
tion, but as practical trust in the active power and 
wisdom and love of God who is ready to guide us if 
we seek His spirit ; and worship, not as the perfunc- 
ory repetition of some familiar words, but as the 
opening of heart, the submission of conscience, the 
surrender of will, to the holinesss and love of God 
disclosed in Jesus Christ. As we learn in this sense 
to trust and worship Him, seeking that faith and 
worship the guidance of our lives, we shall both be 
drawn together in a fellowship of the Spirit which 
embraces all who trust and worship, and shall learn 
Avhat is God's will for ourselves, our share in the all- 
embracing purpose of His love. 

God is very patient. We must not expect the 
solution of our problems in any brief period of time ; 



nor will it come as a whole, in a single flash; but 
through the slow progress of advances made step 
by step. In that advance, one step of great impor- 
tance is to establish and maintain a mutual under- 
standing and good-will between the great families 
of English-speaking nations. Our common speech 
will help us ; our tradition, so far as it is common 
to us both, will help us too. But these are no more 
than aids. The real bond of unity, between us and 
between all men, is our common faith in Jesus Christ 
as Saviour, Lord and God, our common allegiance 
to Him as King. 

That faith and allegiance will bring the fuller in- 
spiration and support for our tasks on earth, exactly 
because they are independent of the chances and 
changes of mortal ife. The consummation for which 
we hope is not the discovery of an earthly paradise 
by methods of sociological experiment ; it is rather 
the eternal Kingdom of Cod wherein all history 
may find its fulfilment. Here is the permanent 
paradox of religion. We may be used to save the 
world only so far as our first thoughts are not of 
the world at all, but of God and His glory. We 
shall be the better citizens of our earthly states 
and of the commonwealth of nations, because our 
first citizenship is in Heaven. For the world's chief 
need is not for progress, but for redemption; and 
its loftiest hope is not for a perfect administration 
of secular affairs but for a fellowship of mankind 
that springs from communion with God. We shall 
find peace and good -will on earth only when we 
have learned to join in giving glory to God in the 
highest. 



PRESIDING BISHOP'S CALL TO PRAYER 
FOR PEACE 



At a moment when the menace of War is threat- 
ening the world the Church of Christ should be 
found in prayer for Peace. I address this message 
to the Dioceses of our Church, asking that oppor- 
tunity be given for constant intercession. 

In Cathedrals^ Parish Churches and Missions let 
prayers for universal peace be offered in the Eucha- 
rist, in Litanies, and in periods of silent petition. 
Let our people lift up their hearts in supplication 
to Almighty God that the spirit of aggression yield 
to the spirit of counsel and understanding, and that 
the Nations seek with one accord the reign of peace 
on earth. 

JAMES DeWOLF PERRY, 

Presiding Bishop 



THE MISSION HERALD 



The Mission Herald 

ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 
Published Monthly except July and AugruBt at 

607 Southern Building 
WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor 

REV. WALTER R. NOE 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 

RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 

MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

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Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
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Subscribers changing their address, or failing to receive 
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dress. 



THE HOME AT CHRISTMAS 



The Gospel begins and ends with the Christian 
home. 

At the outset we are introduced to the Holy Family. 
The devotional thought of the Church sees in father, 
mother and Child an image of the Trinity. The best 
illustration of the Oodhead finds its source in the 
household. Thus our earthly homes reflect heavenly 
realities. Human relationships become the symbol of 
the divine. The interpretation of God comes to us 
through the relation of parent and child and we learn 
to think of him as our Father. For this reason the 
picture of the Holy Family took hold on the imagi- 
nation. The master painters sought to depict the 
scene. The Madonna and Child taxed the genius of 
a Titian, a Raphael, a Michael Angelo. 

As the curtain falls on the life of Jesus He places 
His benediction on the home and in His dying mo- 
ments makes provision for His mother. This has 
touched the heart of the world. It has written it- 
self indelibly on the consciousness of Christendom. 
Thus does the Gospel enthrone the mother 

Pierre Loti in his "Romance of a Child," recalls 
a day when he lay sick in bed from some childish 
ailment. The door opened. "My mother came in 
smiling, bringing a bunch of hyacinths. Oh I can see 
her now as I saw her then in the doorway — the ex- 
pression of her eyes, the sound of her voice, the 
details of her dress. She bent over me and kissed 
me. I wanted nothing more — not to cry, not to get 
up, not to go out. She was there. That was enough. 

"I feel there is something in mother's face that 
death cannot touch. My love for my mother has 



been the only unchanging love of my life so free 
from every material tie that it almost gives me con- 
fidence in the one indestructible thing — the soul, 
and I think that when I have done playing my little 
part, in the world I shall go to rest somewhere wel- 
comed by my mother, who has led the way and the 
smile of serene assurance she now wears will become 
a smile of triumphant knowledge." 

The mother's influence is the most potent factor 
that pays on human life. We are surrounded by a 
cloud of witnesses. Hear Lincoln declare, "I owe 
everything I am to my mother." 

Beecher lost his mother as a boy. All through 
his career he cherished the memory of her who left 
him when he was a tiny child. "From her," he 
says, "1 received my love of the beautiful, from 
her my childlike faith in God, and if I speak what 
seems to some of you the rhapsody of woman it is 
because I had a mother. If I were to live a thou- 
sand years I could not express the least I owe to 
her." 

Coolidge took oath of office in a Vermont school 
house and went as his first act to stand for a moment 
at his mother's grave. 

Andre's bones were laid to rest beside his mother's 
grave in obedience to a wish he once expressed. 

"No matter where I may be found after death 
I wish to be buried alongside my mother." 

There is a very significant passage in St. Paul 
where he traces the spiritual life of Timothy. He 
analyzes the factors that entered into his character 
and singles out the elements of greater force. Is 
there any significance in the omission of the father? 
He refers to the faith of the grandmother and the 
mother. Was it true in his day that men were sadly- 
indifferent to the religious training of youth or was 
it a master stroke of the Apostle's pen to indicate 
the larger influence of the mother in moulding the 
spiritual environment of the child? 

T would address the mothers everywhere with a 
plea to uphold the highest standards of the home." 
The classic writer puts this sentiment on the lips of 
Ulysses: "Oh that [ could see the smoke curling 
over my home in Ithaca, then death would overtake 
me happily." This is pre-eminently an American 
sentiment. Anglo-Saxons are lovers of the home. 
John Howard Payne amid the gaiety of the French 
capital turned fondly to a simple cottage at East 
Hampton and gave voice to words that struck i 
responsive chord in the popular heart, "Home, Sweet 
Home." .... 

As we approach the Christmas season the festival 
of the mother and the Babe, let me suggest three 
counsels of perfection. First let every head of a 
household look well to family worship. Religious 
education is primarily of the home where the mind 



DECEMBER, 1935 



of the child, like the sensitive film on the photo- 
grapher's plate catches the impress of the slightest 
influence. Second in these days of financial stress 
and destitution we must see to it that families be 
kept together. It is we'll to direct our benevolence 
primarily to our own neighborhoods maintaining 
homes that are threatened with disintegration. 
Third let us mark the birth of the infant Jesus by 
a renewed interest in childhood realizing that as 
we bring brightness and cheer into the dreary lives 
of these little ones we are serving the Baby Boy of 
Bethlehem. —THOMAS J. LACEY 



ANNUAL MEETING OF WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 



LARGE NUMBER OF PARISHES AND MISSIONS 
HAVE PAID IN FULL FOR 1935 



The following parishes and missions have com- 
pleted the payments on the amounts that they told 
us to expect for Diocesan and General Church Work 
for 1935 : 

Convocation of Wilmington: Clinton, St. Paul's; 
Red Springs, St. Stephen's; Lumberton, Trinity; 
North West, All Souls'; Pikeville, St. George's; 
Vanceboro, St. Paul's; Wrightsville, St. Andrew's; 
Wilmington, Delgado Mission; Tolar Hart (Payette- 
ville) Good Shepherd; Grace Church, Whiteville. 

Convocation of Edenton: Edenton, St. Paul's; 
Washington, St. Peter's; Williamston, Advent; 
Woodvi'lle, Grace Church ; Murfreesboro, St. Barna- 
bas'; Roxobel, St. Mark's; Winterville, St. Luke's; 
Yeatesville, St. Matthew's. 

Convocation of Colored Church Workers: Wil- 
mington, St. Mark's; Kinston, St. Augustine's; Had- 
dock's Cross Roads, St. Stephen's. 



FIRST REPORT ON EVERY MEMBER CANVASS 



The first report on the Every Member Canvass 
to reach the Diocesan Office, came from Delgado 
Mission, and was sent to us by Mr. Ashley T. St. 
Amand, layman-in-charge. It shows a substantial 
increase in the amount pledged for the support of 
the Diocesan and General Church Work. 

The report of the Canvass at Grace Church, White- 
ville, which we are publishing in this issue, was the 
next to come to the office. 

We understand that very successful Canvasses have 
been conducted in many of the parishes and missions 
of the Diocese, and that reports will be mailed to the 
Diocesan Office at an early date. 



PECANS FOR SALE 

Hand selected, paper shell, "Schley" pecans. 

At 35c delivered in five-pound lots or more. 

MISS MARY RANDOLPH McGWIGAN 

Lake Waccamaw, N. C. 



The annual meeting of the Woman's Auxiliary 
of the Diocese of East Carolina will be he'ld in St. 
John's Parish, Wilmington, N. C, January 22 ; , 23, 
1 936. 



CONVOCATION OF EDENTON 



Outstanding 1 Social Service Projects at Christmas 



St. George's, Lake Landing. The members of the 
congregation will bring joy to the old folks at the 
County Home by presenting each with a Christmas 
gift. 

St James', Ayden will remember people less for- 
tunate with gifts. 

St. Paul's, Greenville. The two auxiliaries of the 
parish, will send a box of gifts to their adopted 
orphans at Thompson Orphanage. 

From Friendly Hall will go baskets of fruit to the 
County Home and prison camp. 

St. Peter's, Washington. The congregation will 
remember the folks at the County Home with bas- 
kets of fruit, after which there will be a service for 
them. 

Zion, near Washington. The members of the con- 
gregation will send a box of toys to Thompson Or- 
phanage: also will remember the shut-ins Christinas 
Day with baskets of fruit. 

Holy Cross Aurora. The congregation will make 
an especial effort to visit the shut-ins Christmas Day. 
MRS. W. A. DARDEN 

Publicity Chairman 



C. C. C. camps in two years have absorbed 105,000 
copies of the New Testament besides many thou- 
sand other portions, sent by the American Bible 
Society through chaplains. The books are said to 
have been distributed with care and only when it 
was evident that they were wanted. The young 
men's response has amazed the chaplains. 



Apropos of that woman in Borneo who has been 
carrying ser sick husband on her back over the 
jungle trail to church, the Christ Church Messenger 
from Mobile, Ala., says: 

"Many a man is being carried through this life 
by a good woman. But if a man does not learn to 
stand upon his own feet spiritually in this life he 
is going to have a lot to learn when the inevitable 
time comes that he does have to stand alone. The 
time to learn to walk is now." 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD 



GRACE CHURCH, WHITEVILLE 



The annual Every Member Canvass which has 
just been completed in this Parish has been most 
successful,, largely because of a new idea which 
we put into operation, and which brought almost 
one hundred per cent results. 

After the preparation for the Canvass which was 
very thorough, the Rector called a meeting of the 
men of the Parish and told them what the amount 
of the budget for the coming year would be, which 
figures he said had been reached by the members 
of the Vestry, meeting with him, and after a full 
discussion of every item of the budget which were 
agreed upon it was found that to reach that amount 
the Vestry and men of the Parish would have to 
do their full share by subscribing as fully as they 
might be called upon to do. 

After an agreement was reached on the amount 
of the whole budget, the Rector produced the names 
of every Communicant of the Church and said that 
the only way by which this amount could be raised 
would be for every man to agree to an assessment 
of an amount which represented a small increase 
over that of former years but what was thought 
to be a fair share for every one. 

The result was that every man on the Vestry 
subscribed at the rate of five dollars a month while 
the rest of the men of the Parish responded by 
accepting assessments which ranged from two to 
five dollars a month. 

Then the women of the Parish were called in and 
they were asked to agree to the assessment idea 
and at the same time a pledge card was handed to 
each one with her name and the amount expected 
of her marked on it. The result was that every 
woman present agreed to the amount and the full 
amount of the budget was subscribed in this way. 

At the beginning of this Canvass there were some 
who were afraid of the assessment idea as it was 
feared that the assessments might be too high, but 
when the cards were given out and every one saw 
how much his assessment was they were free to 
say that not a single assessment was excessive and 
many said that they thought their assessments very 
moderate and volunteered to give more, which of 
course they were free to do as well as free to reduce 
the amount if they felt so inclined. 

The great advantage in this idea it seems to me is 
that it gives every member of the Church a thorough 
understanding of the financial problems of the 
Church, informing them of the reason for every item 
and how the money would be used, and when they 
fully understood this they were willing to subscribe 
as freely as they were called upon to do, and then 



again the bringing together of the entire congre- 
gation and laying the whole matter before them 
as was done here made them feel their responsibili- 
ties and so made them eager and ready to accept 
their share of the work. 

There are fourteen families and ten other members, 
and the amount pledged is nine hundred dollars 
for the coming year which shows the fine spirit 
of this congregation and their willingness to co- 
operate in the work of the Church which we feel is 
most important, as we feci that the money which 
we subscribe to the work of the Church is the 
very best investment we can make as it represents 
money spent for the Lord's Work in His Kingdom 
which will bring spiritual results in every field 
to which it goes. 

W. W. SCHULKEN 

Senior Warden 



REPORT OF FINDINGS COMMITTEE OF THE 

WOMAN'S AUXILIARY— CONVOCATION 

OF EDENTON 



We. the members of the Findings Committee of 
the 1935 meeting of the Woman's Auxiliary of the 
Edenton Convocation wish to make the following 
report : 

Today's session has been splendid. Considering 
it in some detail let us emphasize that it is always 
essential to a successful meeting for the delegates 
to be on time in order that the meeting may run 
on schedule. 

The highlights of the meeting as gathered from 
the talks and reports from the floor, are : 

1. That all Church Schools need support from all 
adults. 

?. That the general aims of the Auxiliaries are 
to follow more closely the Diocesan program. 

3. That the enthusiasm of the Diocesan Chairman 
is excellent and worthy of emulation. 

4. That Women all over the world definetely 
want peace, and that the women of our Church 
have taken a definite stand for it. 

f>. That the Forward Movement is succeeding in 
the Diocese because spirituality dominates the move- 
ment. 

It is evident that a step forward has been made 
in the Diocese as the trend of today's meeting 
points unmistakenly toward spiritual aims and con- 
siderations, where heretofore monetary and material 
things have appeared to hold too much attention. 
Respectfully submitted by, 

HENNIE E. LONG 
MRS. CLAYTON MOORE 
MRS. G. F. HILL 



DECEMBER, 1935 



11 



General Church News 



In the course of her report to the Woman's Aux- 
iliary executive board at its last meeting, Miss Grace 
Lindley, the executive secretary, said: 

"As I see it, two imperatives press upon us. The 
firsts to think through present conditions to possible 
action on the problems of peace and war and on the 
problems of present-day missions 

"Among the questions which must be considered 
is a new thinking into the mission of the Church 
and those of unity, of cooperation, of the personnel 
needed, of methods for awakening the interest of 
the Church in her mission, and of finding funds 
for her work. 

"If we are to contribute to the solution of such 
questions we should be reading and thinking care- 
fully and deeply. . . . And while we need material 
on which to base the thinking, we need most of all 
quiet in which to do it. 

"So I am brought to the second imperative. We 
must seek deeper knowledge of God. If we believe, 
as I suppose we do, that God is in history, there 
can be little more important than finding out what 
He wants done now. And if we believe that Ho 
uses His creatures in the working out of His will, 
there can be nothing more important for us than 
to let Him make ns fit for His use. And how can 
we know Him except by contemplation and ador- 
ation?" 

Miss Lindley quoted from the Archbishop of 
York's recent book, "Nature, Man and God"; "<Life 
cannot be fully integrated about the self as center; 
it can only be fully integrated when it becomes 
God-centered. For God is the real center of the real 
world ; His purpose is its controlling principle ; only 
in Him therefore can all creatures find a center 
which brings them all to harmony with one another 
and with themselves. ..." 



If any of you are ready now to pass on to another 
reader the book called The Revealing Christ, issued 
last Lent by Bishop Perry, the Church Periodical 
Club, 281 Fourth Avenue, New York, can give you 
the addresses of people who would be glad to havo 
a copy. 



The National Council meets December 10th to 
the 12th, and the Woman's Auxiliary Executive 
Board, December 6th to the 9th. 

Two major subjects to be discussed by the Na- 



tional Council are first the relation of the Church's 
young people to the Council, especially in regard 
to the Church's mission, and second some plans and 
suggestions for promoting the Church's work. 

See the Church papers late in December and The 
Spirit of Missions for January, for reports of the 
meetings. 



Add to the list of bishops-elect the Rev. Bartel H. 
Reinheimer, D. D., executive secretary of the Na- 
tional Council's Field Department, elected bishop 
coadjutor of Rochester on November 19. His de- 
cision not yet announced. 



Two approaching elections are for a coadjutor 
in Western Michigan, January 15-16, and a diocesan 
bishop of Kentucky, January 23. The election foi 
Central New York does not come until May 5. 



Message from a 16-year-old mountain boy to one 
of the missionaries: "Just a note to let you no I 
am going to get married today and I want to borrow 
a pair of pants and a white shirt. I will bring them 
back as soon as I make the trip." Suppy work 
Secretaries will see the need of their work. 



Add to your collection of brief but stirring Chris- 
tian biographies the story of John Chrysostom Early, 
in the Philippine Islands Diocesan Chronicle for 
October, 1935, written by Vice-Governor Joseph R. 
Hayden. Covernor Early was a great and true 
servant of his country and his Church, a man to 
whom statesmen and bishops and primitive tribesmen 
were devoted. 

His life has been "a translation into reality of 
the practical idealism that has been the finest qual- 
ity in his country's relations with the Oriental people 
for whose destiny America assumed responsibility 
thirty-five years ago." 

To relate just one small item from the Story : At 
times when he was returning to headquarters from 
far up in the mountans, the river would be in a 
flodd and the trails blocked. The young governor 
would order a raft constructed of bamboo and ride 
home on the crest of the flood. "The trip would 
take about two days by trail but I could make it by 
the river in four hours. A raft of bamboo will roll 
over and over in the rapids but it never sinks, and 
if one is a fairly good swimmer it adds zest to the 
experience to be rolled off and make the raft again." 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD 



THE FORWARD MOVEMENT 



"THE LUCK OF THE ROAD' 



More than 2,500,000 pieces of Forward Movement 
literature, including "Forward — Day by Day", have 
been disseminated by the Forward Movement Com- 
mission within the past nine months. 



The next Forward Movement manual in the Series, 
"Forward — Day by Day", is to be ready December 
16th. This will cover Epiphany and the pre-Lenten 
Season. Obtainable, like previous manuals, at two 
cents each from the Forward Movement Commission, 
223 West Seventh Street, Cincinnati, Ohio. 



New York — The Girls' Friendly Society's share 
in the Forward Movement includes, by vote of the 
Board of Directors, the study and teaching of the 
principles of prayer. 

The Board of Directors took this action on recom- 
mendations of Bishop Hobson, chairman of the For- 
ward Movement Commission, and the Worship Com- 
mittee. 

Mrs. Samuel Edsall, national chairman of the 
Worship Committee, began the study with an arti- 
cle in the December number of the Record, publi- 
cation of the Society. 



Portland, Maine. — The Woman's Auxiliary of 
Maine has come to the aid of some needy parishes In 
the diocese by getting individuals to purchase for dis- 
tribution copies of "Forward- — day by day", the 
Forward Movement manual of Bible readings and 
meditations. The manual, according to Miss Mar- 
guerite Ogden, president, is eagerly sought. 



San Antonio, Texas — Active participation of lay- 
men in the Forward Movement was urged by Eugene 
S. Thompson, president of the Laymen's League of 
the Episcopal Church, in an address at a conference 
'of laymen of the Diocese of West Texas recently at 
St. Mark's Church here. 

At the conclusion of the meeting, the laymen of: 
six parishes, with the approval of their rectors, re- 
quested charters for parochial branches of the Lay- 
men's League, and also a charter for a diocesan 
branch of the League. 



By Joseph R. Sizoo, Minister of the New York 

Avenue Presbyterian Church of 

Washington, D. C. 



Memphis, Tenn. — A Litany of the Disciples' Way, 
from the Forward Movement manual, "Forward- 
day by day" was included in the order of service 
for the recent installation of the Rt. Rev. James M. 
Maxon, D. D., fourth bishop of Tennessee. 



Philippians 4:11 I have learned in whatsoever 
state I am, therewith to be content." 

I was sitting one afternoon on the sun deck of a 
transatlantic liner homeward bound. A small group 
of us fellow travelers, were discussing our reactions 
to the experiences of the summer. Two in the group 
were full of complaint and self-pity. The cabin 
on the ship was too small ; the hotels were poorly 
ventilated; the tram cars were impossible; the 
continental breakfast was inadequate; the food 
was poorly prepared; the beds were hard; soap 
was difficult to get; the customs officers were not 
gracious; the languages of the people were im- 
possible. Altogether they had had a wrenched time 
of it. Indeed. I wonder sometimes why they left 
home at all. Tourists of this type are about as 
comfortable to travel with as sand ticks. One grows 
quickly tired of them and so I walked away. A 
moment later another left the group and, joining 
me in a promenade, said, "I hope I will always be 
able to take the luck of the road." I have thought 
about that sentence hours and days. I make it 
now the meditation of this New Year's Day Service: 
taking the luck of the road. "I have learned in 
whatsoever state I am, therewith to be content." 

The Church at Philippi was Paul's favorite. The 
happiest hours of his ministry he had spent among 
them. The little band had become greatly disturbed 
by the news that Paul was in prison. They were 
not only saddened by it, but chagrined. It was 
the last thing he deserved and when the gates of 
the Mamartine jail did not open to the Apostle, 
they became offended. They began to say what 
Oarlyle said centuries later, "God's in the world 
and does nothing about it." When the news of 
their distressing state of mind came to Paul, he 
wrote this letter. It is a plea for contentment. It 
abounds in the call to joy. It is the happiest docu- 
ment in the religious literature of the world, as 
though sung by the seraphs from Heaven. It is 
a lyric of unalloyed happiness. 

Now, the remarkable thing about this document 
is that the man who wrote it was a prisoner. It 
was not a cheap bit of claptrap tossed off by one 
with a carefree life; not a whimsical fancy of one 
who found life a bed of roses. Paul was a prisoner 
cast into a dark charnel house, a deep pit dug close 
to the sewers of Rome into which the prisoner 
was let down by a chain. There was nothing to 



DECEMBER, 1935 



13 



enthuse over in that environment. There were no 
gardens, no starlight, no sunshine. When you pic- 
ture that prison scene you expect to hear groans 
and resentment. The prospects of release were very 
dim and the vague feeling was coming over him 
that he would never again be a free man. But 
listen to his words. They come from a man bathed 
in star dust and plumed in sunshine. 

Being reviled, he blessed; being persecuted, he 
endured; being defamed, he entreated; being made 
filth and offscouring, he rejoiced. He concludes 
his letter with the triumphal song. "Most gladly, 
therefore, will 1 glory in my infirmities." 

How can you explain this contentment? By what 
possible stretch of the imagination can you argue 
gladiu-ss and joy out of such a setting? Is it a 
reasonable philosophy: "I have learned in what- 
soever state I am, therewith to be content?" Can 
we live by it ? Upon what is it based? 

1. Obviously, it is the philosophy of a man who 
met life as he found it. Paul did not debate it, 
but he lived it. He greeted the circumstances of 
life face forward, unafraid. He felt, however dif- 
ficult it was to explain, that Cod had written 
adversity into human life. Everywhere a cross is 
set up. Every mountain has its valley, every oasis 
has a desert, every island has a lonely sea, every 
rainbow has a storm cloud, every day has a night. 
By the side of every Abraham stands a Lot ; by 
the side of every Joshua stands an Achan. With 
a heroic self-discipline Paul accepts the fact of life. 
AVith the Hoosier poet of a later day he could say, 
"If Cod sorts out the weather and sends rain, then 
rain's my choice." He had the courage to greet 
life and there came to him a great peace. In the 
face of the bewildering misfortunes he had learned 
to be content. 

There is little contentment in the world today 
because we have refused to face heroically the facts 
of life. We are too disposed to debate life rather 
than to live it. We brood so much over the exper- 
iences of life until we have become sour and cynical. 
Life has been robbed of poise and happiness by 
this engulfing spirit. 

We lack today that simple courage. We are so 
apt to repeat a poet's sorrowful lamentation, "O 
that I had wings like a dove, then I would fly 
away." But you cannot run away from business 
because it is bad ; you cannot burn the social order 
because it hurts. Stand up to life. Accept the 
blows as they come. Take the luck of the road 
until you can say: "1 have learned in whatsoever 
state I am, therewith to be content." Do the best 
you can with life. When was an oak tree ever made 
without storms? When was the tone of a violin 
ever sweet without the pressing of the strings? 



When was there ever a rainbow without a cloud, 
a dawn without a night}, a resurrection without a 
Calvary? With heroic self-discipline, "Welcome 
each rebuff that turns earth's smoothness rough." 
That is the acid test of all character. We do not 
half learn the lessons of life until with heroic self- 
discipline we accept the universe as we find it, 
laboring without recognition, suffering without bit- 
terness. "Are you able to drink the cup that I 
drink of." is the eternal question with which Christ 
confronts life. 

"We are not here to play — to dream, to drift, 
We have hard work to do and loads to lift, 
Shun not the battle— face it, 'tis Cod's gift," 
It is this we need today. Life is scourged with 
terrible pessimism. The cynicism which is en- 
gulfing the age is born from this refusal to see 
life as it is. The pulse would be quickened and 
the radiance would be restored if only the temper 
of Paul's life might be made real among us. Some- 
times on a holiday I walk down the street and see 
'the various flag poles and masts carrying their ban- 
ners. Some are short and some are long; some 
are very thick and some are slim as saplings; some 
reach toward the stars and some are dwarfed to 
the earth. I can well imagine some of these flag 
poles saying. "I regret that I did not push my 
head higher toward the stars; I am grieved that I 
am not stronger or steadier; it is a source of great 
disappointment that I do not lift my head higher; 
but blessed be Cod I am not ashamed of the flag 
I flung to the breezes." May your lives today 
have the rebirth of that romance. 

2. Then, too, this is the philosophy of a man 
Avho saw life in terms of Cod. Wherever he went 
it was the sense of a sustaining Cod which en- 
raptured him. The assurance that the arms of a 
loving Hod were underneath and round about him 
never passed out of his thinking. He believed that 
Cod had something to do with the events of life. 
You hear him shout the refrain: "All things work 
together for good to them that love Cod." From 
a prison cell comes the exultant note, "For me to 
live is Christ." He met life heroically because God 
was in the offing of every day. He never lost 
sight of Omnipotence. Paul was convinced that 
God ruled over and overruled the affairs of men, 
browbeat them though we may. 

There, my friends, you have the fact of Paul's 
contentment as he accepted the luck of the road 
at every turn. Not otherwise is it with us. God 
has something to do with the world these days. 
He is not done with life. The reins have not slipped 
out of His hands. Tt is because we have lost sight 
of the pardener in the garden that the weeds seem 
so hopeless. It is because we have forgotten the 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD 



king in his kingdom that rebellion is so red and 
ravaging. When we come back to a new assurance 
that God is in this world and with us, we shall 
walk more heroically and uncomplainingly. Look 
back upon your life. Run the fingers of memory 
along the experiences of the past. Can you not see 
that everything fits into the scheme of things? 
It is still true: "The Lord is my shepherd." There 
may be but one string left on the harp of life, but 
God can play upon it a hallelujah. Taking the 
luck of the road means working without strain, 
toiling without fatigue ; it means peace of mind, 
faith in God. Just as sure as He walked with the 
pilgrims to Emmaus in the centuries agoi, so does 
He walk the road of life today with those who 
bravely carry on. 

A weaver stands before his loom. Before him 
(here are many shuttles. Each shuttle holds a tin- 
ted thread. One is orange, another is blue, this 
one is violet, that one is gray and another is black. 
It is grossly unfair to judge the purpose of the 
weaver by one thrust of the shuttle with the black 
or the gray. "Wait until all the shuttles have tangled 
their threads into a perfect tapestry of beautiful 
design. It is not otherwise with life. God is at 
•the loom. Before Him are many shuttles with many 
tinted threads of the days of life. Some days are 
brilliant like crimson; some are gay like the violet; 
some are hopeful with blue; some are drab like 
gray or black. Do not judge the weaver until he 
has emptied every shnltle of its last stray thread 
and tangled them into the tapestry of a triumphant 
life. God is at the loom. Give Him time. 

One day that rare spirit called the Dr. Luke of 
Labrador was called to a village to give medical 
care. To hasten his errand of good will he decided 
npon the hazardous coarse of cutting across the 
fro7.cn bay. Half way over the winds suddenly 
shifted, the ice snapped and he was thrown with 
his dog team into the cold water. After a struggle 
in the cold water he lifted himself and his dog team 
upon an ice pan and as the sun set over that bleak 
north bay. he was being carried into the open sea. 
into oblivion and death. He killed some dogs of 
his team and tied their long bones together for a 
mast, on which he hoisted a towel as a signal of 
distress. Then he wrapped himself in the skin of 
the dogs he had been compelled to kill and, with 
garments freezing on his body, huddled close to 
the dogs of his sled and settled down for the night. 
Then, strange enough, he tells us he began to sing. 
And this was his song: 

"My Lord and Father while I stray 

Far from my home on life's rough way 

teach me from my heart to say 

Thy will be done." 
And then he fell asleep. Men and women. Dr. 



Grenfell could take the luck of the road because 
the assurance of an overruling God brought him 
contentment and peace. 

* * # * * 

Life is a race. Don't whimper if the track is 
rough and the goal is distant. One day you shall 
reach it. Life is a voyage. Don't complain if the 
storm batters the hull or the winds tatter to shreds 
the sails. One day \ou shall come to your haven. 
Life is a growth. Don't find fault if the seed lies 
smothered and submerged in the dark earth before 
it blooms and bossoms. One day you shall have 
your harvest. Life is a pilgrimage. Don't falter on 
the road through self-pity because the stones cut 
your feet and leave your blood on the trail. One day 
you will come to Immanuel's land. The God who 
through the boundless sky guides the flight of the 
sparrow, who builds the blind bird's nest, will see 
1o it that in His good time you shall arrive. Take 
the luck of the road and "the peace of God which 
passeth all understanding shall keep your mind and 
heart in His love." 

"Whichever way the wind doth blow 

Some heart is glad that it is so. 

So blow it east or blow it west, 

The wind that blows — 'that wind is best." 
My greetings to all who share the pilgrimage of 
these days and, in the words of Charles Dickens: 

"Many Happy New Years! 

Unbroken friendships! 

Great accumulation of cheerful recollections! 

Affection on earth ! 

And heaven at last for all of us." 



NOTES FROM FRIENDLY HALL 



Christmas is almost here! and with this happiest 
of all seasons come many activities for the girls of 
Friendly Hall. But at present we must tell you what 
we have been doing during the month of November. 

Our Auxiliary meeting on November 4th was es- 
pecially interesting because we elected officers to 
fil! the places which were vacant at the beginning of 
this term. With Mrs. Outland's permission, we de- 
cided to let our Auxiliary year run from September 
until June. The old officers agreed to remain in 
office until June. So, the list of officers for this 
year stands as follows: 

President, Maywood Wagner: Vice-President, Sa- 
rah Can-away: Secretary, Ellen Moore: Treasurer, 
Ellen Boone: United Thank Offering Custodian, Eliz- 
abeth Wagner; Chairman of Supnlv Department, 
Catherine Thompson; Chairman of Educational De- 
partment. Camille Swindell; Chairman of Soc : al Ser- 
vice Sarah Burin ; Chairman of Publicity Depart- 
ment, Mary Tarry: Chairman of Field Department, 
Frances Weeks. 



DECEMBER, 1935 



15 



IN MEMORIAM 



Mrs. Ida Blount, widow of the Hon. Thomas W. 
Blount died at home on November 3, 1935, after a 
lingering illness. She was born in Plymouth, N. C. 
April 18, 1S4S, and confirmed by Bishop Atkinson 
when sixteen years of age. She was married to 
Thomas W. Blount in October 1881. Since then she 
has lived in Roper at licr home "Sleepy Hollow" 



where she took an active part in all church affairs. 
Taught the infant class in Sunday School for fifty 
years. She had no near relatives, only some cousins, 
Mrs. H. R. Way and D. W. Blount at Belhaven, and 
Mrs. Elizabeth Wimmer of New Jersey. 

Interment was in Grace Church Cemetery, Ply- 
mouth. Monday afternoon, November 4th at 3 :30 
o'clock. 

Mrs. Blount was an active member of the Woman's 
Auxiliary until too feeble to attend. 



(THE FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



PLEASE READ IT CAREFULLY, 

WHERE DOES YOUR PARISH OR MISSION STAND IN THE 
LIST? It is a matter that ought to concern eveiy INDIVIDUAL 
CHURCHMAN ! 

"EXPECTANCY" is the amount that your parish or mission has 
reported to us for 1935, based on pledges of individuals and other 
sources. 

STATEMENT OF THE AMOUNTS PAID BY THE PARISHES A\D MISSIONS FOR DIOCESAN AND GENERAL 

CHURCH WORK, JANCAUY 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1935.1 



CONVOCATION OF WILMINGTON. 



Parishes 

Beaufort, St. Paul's $ 

Clinton, St. Paul's 

Fayetteville, St. John's 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 

Hope Mills, Christ Church 

Kinston, St. Mary's 

New Bern, Christ Church 

Red Springs, St. Stephen's 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' .. 

Southport, St. Philip's 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd 

Wilmington, St. James' 

W'lmington St. John's 

Wilmington, St. Paul's 

Organized Missions. 

Burgaw, St. Mary's 

Faison, St. Gabriel's 



Parishes 

Aurora, Holy Cross 

Ayden. St. James' 

Bath, St. Thomas' 

Belhaven, St. James' 

Bonnerton, St. John's 

Chocowinity. Trinity 

Columbia, S'. Andrew's 

Creswell, St. David's 

Edenton, St. Paul's 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church 

Farmville, Emmanuel 

Gatesvil'e, St. Mary's 

Greenville, St Pauls 

Grifton, St. John's 

Hnnrlton, St. Martin's 

Hertford, Holy Trinity ...... 

Jessama, Zion 

Lake landing. St. George's .. 
Plymouth, Grace Church . . . , 

R<n>er. St. Luke's 

Washington, St Peter's 

Williamston, Advent 



Parishes 

Fayetteville, St. Joseph's 
New Bern, St. Cyprian's . . 
Wilmington, St. Mark's . 



Organized Mission* 

Belhaven. St. Mary's 

Vinton Rt .Tobn-Evanerelist 
Elizabeth City, St. PhiMp's .. 

Goldsboro, St. Andrew's 

Kinston, St. Augustine's 
Washington, St. Paul's 



Expec- 


Paid to 


tations 


Dee. 11 


365.20 


$ 95.05 


50.00 


50.00 


2,150 00 


1,007.26 


1.000.00 


331.01 


60.00 


•»2.60 


1,000. Of 


750.00 


2.125.00 


1,328.84 


55.00 


55.00 


200 fin 


93.13 


169.60 


132.08 


371.40 


291.45 


9 781.50 


7,019.72 


2,031.60 


l.fi 


1.200. 00 


(16.69 


35.00 


30 22 


65.00 


59.00 


CONVOCATION 


250.00 


99.98 


300.S0 


150.00 


a s . o o 


20.42 


250.00 


33 i"! 


100 00 


57 SS 


100.00 




200.00 


156.00 


300.00 


141.50 


1,488.98 


1,188.98 


1,008.76 


832.83 


238.20 


169 Li 


128.00 


22.03 


1.356 2o 


1, 228.P0 


200.00 


70.35 


65.00 


50 00 


400.00 


241.67 


100 00 


62.50 


200.00 


56.30 


200 no 


155.00 


75.00 


53.30 


1,500.00 


1,500.65 


100.00 


111.19 


LOCATION 


OF COLO 


104.00 


95.50 


420 00 


315.00 


140.00 


140.00 


105.06 


33.32 


]0i on 


87 72 


20.15 


14.50 


fin i}i\ 


54 99 


75.00 


75.00 


120.00 


43.61 



Enmberton, Trinity 

North West, All Soul's 

Pikevi le. St. George's .... 
Trenton, Grace Church ... 

Vanceboro, St. Paul's , 

Whiteville, Grace Church .. 
Wrightsville, St. Andrews 



Unorganized Missions. 

Jasper, St. Thomas' 

T>oiiooksvil!e, Mission 

Wilmington, Delgado Mission 



Paroehial Missions. 

Campbellton. St. Philip's . . 
Tolar-Hart, Good Shepherd. 



Expec- 
tations 

174 00 
10.00 
20.00 
15 00 
30.00 

100.00 
6.00 



20.00 
20.00 
10.00 



25.00 
70.00 



Total 



OF EDENTON 

Windsor, St Thomas'... 

Winton. St. John's 

Woodviile, Grace Church 



Organized Missions 

Ahoskie St. Thomas' 

Fairfield, All Saints' 

Murfreesboro, St. Barnabas' 

Roxobel. St. Mark's 

Sladesville, St. John's 
Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' . 
Sunbury, St. Peter's ..... 
Swan Quarter, Calvary ... 
Winterville, St. Luke's . . 
Yeatesville, St. Matthew's 



Unorganized Missions. 

Avoca, Holy Innocents' . 
Camden, St. Joseph's 



Total 



$ 8,66.1.2 



Unorernnlzed Missions. 

Aurora, St. Jude's 

Beaufort, St. Clement's 

Greenville, St. Andrew's 

Haddock's Cross Roads, St. Stephen's 

Roper. St. Ann's ... 

Wilmington, "Brooklyn" Mission... 
Wrightsville, St. Augustine's 



Total 

Grand Total 



$ 1,354.15 



Paid to 
Dee. 11 

174.00 
10.04 
20.00 
11.50 
30.00 

100.00 
6.00 



15.00 



8.37 

72.68 



| 21,159.30 


$ 13,951.02 


225.00 


157.84 


100.00 


48.77 


150.00 


150.00 


55.00 




10.00 


8 00 


30.0<i 


30 00 


9' 08 


92.08 


10.00 




100. 00 


50 00 


42.00 


35 98 


20.00 


10 75 


125.00 


125.00 


20.00 


20.00 


80.00 


5S.80 


10.00 


5.00 



$ 7,498.30 



43.00 


7.00 


40.00 


33.80 


30.00 


9.00 


30. On 


30.00 


26.00 


4.00 


20.00 


13.50 


20.00 


13.50 



$ 970.41 



? 32.177.67 $ 22,420.82 



D6 



THE MISSION HEEALD 



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227 South J Sixth 'Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Dear Sirs: 

You may send, to the address 'below ccotj 

of the New Games arid -Stunts !Bod>k, ! Price "Oineldollur 
a copy. 



i 



ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE 

RALEIGH,. NORTH CAROLINA 

(.Conducted for Negro .Youth under the auspices of ; the I'Bpis- 
eopal Church. 

\A ' four year- -.accredited' CdlleKe> Course is offered,, leading to 
degrees of I'B. 'A. and 'B. S., rincludinn Pre-Medickl vwoirk >and 
Teacher Training! for State High School Teachers' certificates. 

A College Preparatory Department, Training School for Nurses 
and School for Religious and Social Workers are connected with 
the College. 

iThoroughi training, healthy environment. Christian influences. 
i -For Catalog and information write — 

The Registrar 
ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE, RALEIGH, N. C. 



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FOR ALL COLDS USE 

VAPOR SALYf - - 25c 
I1ALI1L NOSE AND THROAT DROPS 35c 

MANUFACTURED BY 

JXURENE CHEMICALS, Ltd. 
Washington, North Carolina 




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4-PLY CROCHET YARN 
50c PER POUND 

'WRITE US FOR SPECIAL CLUB 
RATES IN 50-LB. LOTS 

TOLAR, HART & HOLT MILLS 

FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



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:108 "Princess Street 
VWilmington, N.OC. 



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Remittance encloseld '$ 



Will pay postman $. 



Name 



Address 
M. H. 



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SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND | 
JUNIOR COLLEGE j 

'Raleigh, North Carolina 

An 'Episcopal School' for girls— -Hare your daughter j 
receive her education ina church school. j 

Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, B. S., 

Principal ! 

! 

^aint Mary's offers 4 years' High School and 2 I 

years' College work all fully accredited by the South- ! 

'.em Association. Also courses in Music, Art, Ex- j 

pression, Home Economics, and Business. 

:20-Acre Campus. -Gym and Field Sports. .Tennis. I 

Indoor Tiled Swimming Pool. Horseback i 

Riding. Golf 

A. W. TUCKER, "Business Manager. ! 



-t# 



2,*S.o^> 



Jan. 37 

Library* u « fl « u * 

Chapel Hill, 3i« c » 



4 



; :i 







THE MISSION HERALD 



BISHOP'S LETTER 



As this issue of the Mission Herald is dedicated to 
the Woman's Auxiliary of the Diocese, I feel that 
the annual address of the President, Mrs. Fred L. 
Outland, should occupy the space usually given to 
the Bishop's letter, and I trust that this timely and 
inspiring report will be read by every member of 
our large Diocesan family. 

We are entering upon another year of service and 
opportunity and I pray that we may go forward 
with Christ to the winning of new fields and the 
strengthening of His Kingdom in our hearts and 
parishes and world. 

To our hands has been committed a glorious task 
and He is counting on us for loyal, generous coop- 
eration in the accomplishment of His purposes. 

May we prove worthy of our trust; may we, by 
His grace, use the days and months of the coming 
year as God-sent opportunities for joyful service in 
His name. 

Faithfully and affectionately, 

Your friend and Bishop, 

THOMAS C. DAEST 



BISHOP'S APPOINTMENTS FROM FEBRUARY 
2ND TO MARCH 8TH. 



February 2 — St. Stephen's, Red Springs, 11 A. M. 
Christ Church, Hope Mills, 7 :30 P. M. 
3 — Forward Movement Commission 
4 — Conference, Sanford, N. C. 
9 — Good Shepherd, Raleigh, Broadcast 
Service, 1.1 A. M. 
16— St. Gabriel's, Faison, 11 A M. 
18 — Board of Managers, Thompson Or- 
phanage 
19 — State Sunday School Convention, Win- 
ston Salem 
23 — Church of the Advent, Williamston, 
11 A. M. 
St. Martin's Church, Hamilton,, 7:30 
P.M. 
March 1 — Holy Cross, Aurora, 11 A. M. 

St. John's, Bonnerton, 3 P. M. 
St. Jude's, Aurora, 7:30 P. M. 
4 — Grace Church, Charleston — Commun- 
ity Lenten Service, 8 P. M. 
8— St. Paul's, Beaufort, 11 A. M. 

St. Clement's, Beaufort, 3 P. M. 



THOMPSON ORPHANAGE NOTES 



Frances Gatlin, Julian Powell,, Clara Curtis, Bill 
Gatlin, Willie Simmons, Mabel Haddock, Gordon 
Gatlin and Vivian Rice. 

The newly elected officers of the Y. P. S. L, are 
Bill Gatlin, President; Julian Powell, Vice-president; 
Louise Haddock, Secretary. 

A recent debate at the regular meeting of the 
Y. P. S. L. developed intense interest and enthusiasm. 
It was on the subject "Resolved, that men work 
harder than women." The judges finally awarded 
the decision to the negative side, nearly precipita- 
ting a riot. 

Many of the children attended the beautiful Can- 
dle Light Service at St. Peter's on the afternoon of 
the First Sunday after the Epiphany. The children 
retained their lighted candles after the service bear- 
ing them proudly through the streets back to the 
'Orphanage. Some of the Charlotte citizens may 
have thought some new religious sect had come to 
town. 

The Young People's Service League of Christ 
Church, New Bern is to operate the Orphanage 
during the time of their regular meeting on the 
first Sunday in March, at which time a special pro- 
gram in the interest of the Orphanage is to be held. 

Octagon Soap Coupons are still being collected 
by the Orphanage in the hope of being able to 
purchase a power driven lawn mower this summer. 
We have many acres of lawns to cut and it is a 
tedious, back breaking and costly process by hand. 
Coupons from Rnmford's Baking Powder, Knox's 
Jello. Borden's Milk and Kirkman's Soap products 
are also accepted by Colgate, Palmolive Peet Co. 

Two second hand radios were presented during 
the Christmas season, one to the Infirmary by Peytou 
King and one to the boys "Junior Craftsman Club" 
by Mr. and Mrs. Harrelson. 



STATEMENT OF CHRISTMAS BOX PROJECT 
FOR 1935 



Eight Thompson Orphanage boys and girls are on 
the Honor Roll at High School and Junior High. 
The names of those attaining this distinction are: 



Cash For Candy: Green Bay, Wis.. $7.00; Fort 
Lauderdale, Fla.. $1.60; Saint Lucie, Fla., $4.00; 
Lake Worth, Fla.. $2.50. 

Gift from St. Peter's, Washington, N. O. to Hono- 
lulu, T. H, $10.00; for postage, stationery, $4.59; 
cash on hand to balance, $3.31 ; Total Cash, $33 00. 

For gifts: Honolulu, T. H., 216. value $107.95; 
Green Bay, Wis.. 130, value $90.00; Fort Lauderdale, 
Ra., 23, value $22.84; Bedford. Va., 15, value $5.00; 
St. Lucie. Fla.. 37, value $13.50; Lake Worth, Fla.. 
24. value $3.57; Comfort Bags to Tampa. Fla., 18, 
value $22.04. Total 541 gifts, value $273.03; Cash 
$33.00; Grand total, 541 gifts, value $306.03. 
MRS. A. T. STAMAND, 
Diocesan Christmas Box Secretary. 





ssion 




era 




VOLUME L 



WILMINGTON, N. C. JANUARY 1936 



NUMBER 1 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE WOMAN'S AUXILIARY OF THE DIOCESE 

OF EAST CAROLINA 



At the beginning of my second term as your 
President I wish first to express my deep apprecia- 
tion of your loyalty and confidence in me as shown 
in my reelection. 1 have often heard that a second 
term gives greater opportunity for Provincial and 
National outlook; and this is true, for the first term 
is taken up with adjustments and gaining general 
information of Diocesan problems. When they are 
belter known and understood it becomes possible to 
relate them to conditions and problems encountered 
in the larger fields. And while T entered my first 
term with a deep devotion to the cause and to each 
person and group related to the work, I can honestly 
say that my devotion to you and my joy in the work 
has outgrown all bounds. You have given to my 
life something more precious than I knew existed. 

Our Annual Meeting in Elizabeth City last Janu- 
ary is one 'that will never be forgotten by those 
who were fortunate enough to be there. Snow and 
ice did everything possible to interfere with the at- 
tendance, but those who braved the elements found 
a warmth of fellowship and inspiration that out- 
weighed any efforts put forth to got there. Dr. 
McGregor and Miss Neely, our guests, brought us 
viv'd messages of Service and Love, and gave us a 
light to shine far down the pathway of our lives 
and work. Accounts of this meeting have been sent 
to you in the splendid Annual prepared by our 
Secretary, who has*ever shown through her unsel- 
fish interest that First Things take First Place in 
her life. 

Again cur women throughout the Diocese and the 
world shared with other communions in the obser- 
vance of the first Friday in Lent as a World Day 
of Prayer. May we ever hold dear this privilege 
as a real step in unity and inter-denominational co- 
operation. During Lent, and mingled with our de- 
votional development we learned more of the work 
of the Jerusalem and East Mission, and made our 
offerings for this cause on Good Friday. The Spring 
District Meetings were splendidly attended and won- 
derfully helpful, and their development has been 
deeply gratifying to all of your officers and depart- 
ment chairmen. 

At the Diocesan Convention in May it was the 
blessed privilege of the women to join in the cele- 
bration of the Twentieth Anniversary of the Conse- 
cration of our Bishop. It was an occasion never to 
be forgotten, and an opportunity to give expression 



to our appreciation of his life and leadership. As a 
result of this Celebration there was formed a com- 
mittee to raise The Bishop's Anniversary Memorial 
Fund. I will not go into detail as you know already 
of the plan, during the next four years, to wipe out 
our debt in order to appropriately celebrate the Bish- 
op's Twenty-fifth Anniversary and let him go for- 
ward with unhampered steps. I must pause to say 
a word about what we so often speak of as our Dio- 
cesan Debt— though that is such a wrong way to 
express it. Why has there been a debt, and what 
is our responsibility in connection with it? I say 
it is NOT a Diocesan Debt, because our Bishop and 
Executive Council are not responsible for it. It is 
yours and mine — because we promised them certain 
sums with which to carry on the work — and then 
we failed them after they had made plans because 
they believed in us. One of the definite responsi- 
bilities of the AYoman's Auxiliary is to see that all 
Parish Quotas are met and we have failed, too often 
through ignorance, to do our part. I have never 
known you to fail when definitely called upon — so 
I call upon you now, each and every one. to learn 
your Parish problems — to face your responsibilities — 
and together to «-o Forward to the richness of Joy 
in fulfilling your duties as co-workers with God in 
this Diocese. 

Due to the epidemic of infantile paralysis we were 
unable to have our scheduled camps in the summer, 
so we did not have Auxiliary Day at Camp Leach. 
I felt a distinct sense of loss in this omission, as the 
day spent informally with the women and young- 
people from all parts of the Diocese has ever been a 
delight to me. However the quarantine was lifted 
in time for the regular observance of Auxiliary Day 
at Kanuga, so I had the pleasure of attending there 
and sharing with leaders from all parts of our Pro- 
vince, and many lo3^al and interested workers from 
the Church at large. Auxiliary Day at Kanuga is 
the development and expression of a wonderful 
spirit of cooperation among the five Carolina Dio- 
ceses. The Presidents of these Dioceses are in turn 
Hostesses on this day. preparing' the Program and 
presiding over the meeting. At the next meeting 
there East Carolina will be Hostess, so I urge you, 
as many as possible, to attend the whole Adult Con- 
ference and lend your support to your President. 
There is something very wonderful about these 
Conferences that 1 am anxious more of you should 



THE MISSION HERALD 



share in. During the last four years they have en- 
riched my life in many ways. Truly it is one of the 
"springs" where we may pause to refresh ourselves 
— to "Recollect God and re-collect ourselves" — to 
re-think God in all of His goodness and mercy, and 
to re-call ourselves from the many distractions of 
our busy lives, until we regain the poise and peace 
that are our heritage. 

Late in the summer your Board spent a day to- 
gether at Camp Leach going over the Program for 
the year's study and work. At this time the Bishop 
was holding a Clergy Conference at Camp, so it 
was arranged that we all have lunch together, mak- 
ing it possible for us better to know each other and 
to discuss our plans and hopes. The Program as 
sent you each year, is the result of the united effort 
and thought of all of your Board, and is the develop- 
ment of many hours of deep and prayerful thought 
on their part. This effort is not in vain if the Pro- 
gram is faithfully used, so I urge you to develop 
your work around this Outline. The splendid spirit 
of cooperation and interest on the part of all of your 
Officers and Department Chairmen is worthy of 
individual mention, but time forbids. They will 
speak for themselves as they stand before you at 
this meeting to tell of their plans. Due to illness 
and death in their famiiles two of our Board mem- 
bers were unable to go on with their work ; they 
were Mrs. Stewart, Supply Chairman, and Miss Peace 
Church Periodical Club Secretary. We felt a dis- 
tinct sense of loss and sorrow in giving them up, but 
in their places we have two new members, Mrs. John 
H. Bonner, Supply Chairman, and Mrs. Sidney Ward, 
Church Periodical Club Secretary, who have already 
made places for themselves in our hearts and in 
their work. What I have said of our Secretary may 
truthfully be said of all the members of our Board, 
for it would be hard to find greater devotion to a 
cause among a group of ten women. That conse- 
cration on their part has alone made possible any- 
thing I may have done as your President. 

All of our apportionments are important, but there 
are two of our Funds that I want to mention espec- 
ially, because of their significance, in that they 
change each year. They are the Advance Work 
and the Summer Work. The Advance AVork is for 
some project, chosen with the help of Dr. Wood, 
for a definite Mission Field, or work, to be used 
over and above their regular requirements. We have 
not heard yet how the 1935 Fund will be used by 
Miss Skiles at The House of Light, Japan; but I 
am sure you all shared the real joy expressed by 
Dr. Lula Disosway when she wrote that the 1931 
Fund had been used to Air-Condition the Operating 
Room and the Delivery Room at St, Elizabeth's 
Hospital, Shanghai. Anything we can do to add 



to the comfort and efficiency of our faithful mis- 
sionaries is a real step Forward. Our Summer 
Work was a Fund to help with the education of 
young men who are preparing for the Ministry. 
In the words of the Psalmist "Like as the arrows 
in the hand of the giant, even so are the young chil- 
dren"; and when we help those whose lives will 
reach farther into the future than ours we are living 
on with them. 

The Convocational Meetings in the Fall were vivid 
examples of "houses not built with hands" but 
structures grown up on well laid foundations. And 
the Colored Convocation is worthy of its place beside 
the other two. There has ever been a beautiful 
spirit of inter-racial cooperation in this Diocese and 
I am proud of the prvilege of working with them, 
as they strive to carry out our Program each year. 

My activities during the year have made it pos- 
sible for me to visit all parts of the Diocese, for indi- 
vidual and group meetings, where I have shared the 
problems, the interests and the hopes of many. There 
are encouraging indications of growth to be read 
in the "signs of the times", but they only spur us 
on to greater achievements, for we must not — we 
dare not be satisfied. 

During the year I was appointed, with seven other 
women, Associate Member of the Forward Move- 
ment Commission, to represent the Fourth Province, 
which honor I consider is first to our beloved Dio- 
cese, because of its leadership under our consecrated 
Bishop. This great Movement is the outgrowth of 
the last General Convention; and I daresay the theme 
of the Triennial Meeting. Discipleship, with its em- 
phasis on the development of the life of the Spirit, 
had a direct bearing on the trend of thought at that 
time. WHAT is the Forward Movement and WHY 
is it? First of all it is a direct challenge to each 
member of our Church to examine carefully, prayer- 
fully and honestly his, or her, life in the light of 
Discipleship. And next, through a conscientious re- 
dedication of oi7r lives, to deepen and strengthen 
the life of the Spirit, using the seven steps — turn, 
follow, learn, pray, serve, worship, share — until we 
are united in a determined effort to go Forward in 
every phase of onr lives. Are we thinking and 
acting fearlessly today? Are we serving and sharing 
unselfishly? Are we seeking humbly to learn? Are 
we praying and worshipping devoutly? The call 
comes to us first to turn — not only from the careless 
past — but to the glorious possibilities of the present 
and the future. 

May T present the following recommendations for 
your consideration: 

First — A deep and careful study of all reports in 
the Annual. These will not be read to you here, 
as 1hey need time for consideration in your group 



JANUARY. 19.56 



meetings; and we have felt it best to fill our limited 
time here with inspiraton. 

Second— That one year prior to the time of elec- 
tion you choose your new President, that she may 
he preparing herself for office; and that she be sent 
as a delegate to the Triennial Meeting immediately 
before her incumbency. 

Third — That $100.00 be set aside each year from 
the Central Expense Fund to provide three or four 
Scholarships 1o Kanuga for your Officers. 

Fourth — That we avail ourselves of the marvelous 
opportunities of the Forward Movement, using its 
splendid manuals, striving ever to grow and develop 
until we have increased our knowledge and useful- 
ness in all directions. 

In the words of Sir Wilfred Grenfell "Another 
year has gone. God grant that we are all thanking 
Him for its glorious opportunities of doing our bit 
and giving our best to its eternal record." If we 
can share this thought of his, then we have caught 
the vision of the broader meaning of Church Work, 
realizing that every activity must be linked in some 
way with our sense of responsibility, for "when life 
is seen as complete without God, then life is not 
seen completely". 

Respectfully submitted, 

ANNA ROSE OUTLAND 



ANNUAL MEETING OF THE WOMAN'S 
AUXILIARY 



The forty-ninth Annual Meeting of the Woman's 
Auxiliary of the Diocese of East Carolina, which 
was held in St. John's Church, Wilmington, N. C, 
January 22nd and 23rd, was one of the most inter- 
esting and instructive in the history of the organi- 
zation. 

The session was opened at ten A. M. with a cele- 
bration of the Holy Communion. The Rt, Rev. 
Thomas C. Darst, Bishop of the Dioc-se. celebrant, 
assisted by Rev. E. W. Halleck, rector of the Church. 

Immediately following the service, the business 
meeting opened, with Mrs. Fred Outland of Wash- 
ington, N. C, Diocesan President of the Auxiliary, 
in the chair. Other officers present were: Mrs. 
Eva Shackleford, of Farmville, secretary; Mrs. John 
A. Guion. of New Bern, treasurer; Mrs. W. S. Cara- 
wan, president of the Convocation of Edenton. 
Department Chairmen present were: Miss Caroline 
Myers. United Thank Offering; Miss Elizabeth An- 
drews. Student Work; Mrs. John E. Hicks, Chris- 
tian Social Service; Miss Billy Tillinghast, Y. P. S. I,. 
and Camp Leach; Mrs. W. A. Harden, of Greenville, 
Publicity; Mrs. Sidney Ward, Church Periodical 
Club. 

Mrs. David Murohison, President of the Hostess 



Auxiliary, graciously welcomed the delegates. Mrs. 
Worth Wicker, Greenville, responded. 

Mrs. A. M. Waddell. Wilmington, read an appre- 
ciation of Miss Sue Collier, Goldsboro, as she was 
affectionately known by her friends. In brief, Mrs. 
Waddell described her as being a servant of the 
Church, kind, full of humility, forbearance, under- 
standing and courage. 

The president, Mrs. Outland, expressed apprecia- 
tion for her second term of office, saying it had 
given her something precious in her life that she 
did not know existed. 

Next folloAved a review of her accomplishments 
of the year. Some suggestions made to the delegates 
were : read and study Annual ; choose president one 
year prior to election and send her to Triennial in 
preparation for her work; put aside $100.00 to send 
several members to Kanuga Conference this summer. 

Outstanding features were addresses by Dr. Haw- 
kins R. Jenkins. Philippine Islands, Mrs. George 
Marshall of Tokyo, Japan, and Miss Elizabeth Grif- 
fin, a missionary from the Philippines, home on fur- 
lough, who gave a most interesting account of her 
work as treasurer and of the customs of the people. 

Dr. Jenkins works among the Igorots. He gave 
a clear idea of their religion, the medicine man and 
how it affected the work in the hospital. He stated 
that he treated about one hundred patients each day. 
One medicine man was cured of an abscess of the 
liver by operation after he had failed to get relief 
from animal sacrifices. This incident caused him 
to become a Christian and his family and many of 
his friends followed him. 

Mrs. George Marshall gave an interesting talk on 
the current beliefs and superstitions of Japan. 
Particularly illuminating was her analytical sketch 
of Shintoism, Buddhism and Jehoism. 

Other events of interest were the reports of the 
Convocation Chairmen, an address by the Rev. 
George S. Gresham, Chairman of the Department of 
Religious Education, and the Rev. W. H. Wheeler 
of the Thompson Orphanage, Charlotte. 

Mrs. W. S. Carawan and Mrs. S. P. Adams gave, 
talks; the former a Forward Outlook for the Wo- 
man's Auxiliary in the Diocese and the latter gen- 
eral information about the work in the Province of 
Sewanee. 

Rev. Theodore S. Will made the address at the 
Mass Meeting- Wednesday night. His subject was 
the "Forward Movement" and he stressed how it 
had already caused a spiritual rebirth in the Church 
He comnnred "the Episcopal Church to a sleeping 
giant stirring in his sleep" before the Forward 
Movement was launched. He closed his talk with 
these words "We must go forward or we go back- 
continued on Page 14) 



(i 



THE MISSION HERALD 



ADDRESS ON THE MISSIONARY MOTIVE IN 
RELATION TO WORLD CONFUSION 



Delivered Before The Woman's Auxiliary 

of the Diocese of New York by the 

Rt. Rev. Philip Cook, D. D. 



The motive for Christian missions is found in most 
lines of the Gospel, but nowhere more cogently and 
comprehensively stated than in the first passage of 
the Gospel according to St. John: "In the beginning 
was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the 
Word was God." The Eternal Word became flesh 
and dwelt among men. and, through the Spirit, still 
dwells among us to reveal God's purpose, God's 
plan, God's will for mankind. This revelation ap- 
pears in an ever changing light, not because the 
Word changes but we change, so that as we pass 
through new experiences, face new problems, meet 
new conditions in altering relationships, our under- 
standing of the Eternal Word is less clouded and 
more clearly defined. 

The world is filled with confuson. Nation rises 
against nation. There are wars and rumors of wars. 
The pressure of world-wide economic conditions 
drives national leaders into untried and desperate 
experiments, and fear of the future lays its cold hand 
on normal activities. I would ask that we try to 
take the long view and discover if we can the part 
the Christian Church must seek to fulfill in a modern 
world. For the Christian Church, the Body of 
Christ, is steward of the mystery of the Eternal 
Word, and "it is required of stewards that a man 
be found faithful." 

Christ, our acknowledged Master, gave direction 
to His followers to go forth as a conquering society, 
a united family, to make His way known upon earth, 
to bring the nations to Him, to carry His Spirit and 
power to the ends of the earth. With what success, 
with what determination or hesitation Christianity 
has fulfilled that divine injunction must be left to 
the judgment of history. But in that progress there 
are times of pause, periods of uncertainty when many 
lose faith in this purpose and plan, when Christian 
forces themselves become involved in the prevailing 
loss of confidence that inheres in all the institutions 
about it. We are in the midst of such a time at the 
present moment. Many, less sure of the value of 
Christianity to the world, are quick to question the 
place of the Christian Church in modern society 
There is a distinct pause because the ground of 
validity is open to doubt. 

But if there be hesitation on the part of Christian 
forces, there are others, organized on a national scale, 
eajrer to take up such a conquest. One of these 
centers is "Russia. The early Christians were justly 



accused of turning the world upside down through 
their teaching, but Russia has turned its social order 
upside down through force. It has been as though 
one took an old-fashioned hour-glass and placed it 
on end — the sands that were on top now are at the 
bottom, and the bottom sands on 'top. So in that 
land those who were in power find themselves sub- 
merged, and the people formerly submerged now 
rule. Those responsible for the new order make no 
secret of their hope to conquer the world with their 
plan of Communism. The report of their activities 
in this country was made so boastfully that the 
Secretary of State felt constrained to send a pro- 
test to the Russian Government. A reply came back 
to the effect that the Russian Government is a sepa- 
rate organization from the Communistic Society and 
cannot be responsible for its activities. That Society 
is organized to conquer the nations, and life at its 
center depends upon its ability to expand. It is 
missionary in character and pursues its course 
with a zeal, a conviction, and frequently at a sacri- 
fice, which leaves no doubt as to its purpose. Per- 
sons in a position to know declare that in areas of 
the Orient it is a question which will win, Christian- 
ity or Communism. This statement is not to be 
interpreted as an effort to arouse a scare about Com- 
munism. It is an example of a nationally organized 
movement seeking world conquest. 

Other important European centers indicate the 
same trend. A student of European history has 
called attention to the way in which for more than 
a thousand years previous to the Napoleonic period, 
which came to its end in 1815, the population had 
remained practically static at 80.000,000 people. 
For more than ten centuries famine, pestilence, and 
wars had kept it at that level. But in the century 
between 1815 and 1915 the population of Europe 
rose from 80,000,000 to 400.000,000. 

It is not necessary to inquire why this tremendous 
inc7-ease took place, famines eliminated, epidemic;? 
controlled and wars reduced, but what that change 
meant to Europe can easily be imagined. Five had 
to live where one had lived before, five to be pro- 
vided with work where one had worked before, five 
to be fed where food for one was previously required. 
For more than a century America helped the situa- 
tion with an open door to immigrants^, but that door 
is now practically closed. 

From history and literature we gather that the 
lot of the underprivileged during that thousand years 
was not a very happy one — little education, little 
sanitation, meaner political liberties. But in the 
following century such changes took place that after 
the World War the masses were practically in con- 
trol. The nower was in their hands. Rulers who 
had allowed such n calamity as the World War were 
at a discount. The Russian Revolution had already 



JANUARY. 1936 



taken place. Germany was in revolt and trembled 
on the verge of Communism. Italy was not much 
better and workmen were seizing ithe factories. In 
France Socialists and Communists held the balance 
of power and even England was ruled by a Labor 
Party. Then one of those strange, unaccountable, 
swift changes took place which mark a revulsion of 
feeling. Perhaps the masses discovered they could 
not face the responsibilities of power. At any rate 
in swift succession nation after naiton swept aside 
democracy and established themselves under dicta- 
tors, Italy, Germany, Poland, Austria among them. 
The totalitarian state came into being. 

That this type of strong rule brought benefits to 
these nations, order out of chaos, discipline out of 
confusion, is evident. But the strongest of these 
became a nationalized movement looking to world 
conquest. The declared intent of each ruler leaves 
no room for doubt: each must have opportunity to 
expand, each must have access to raw materials to 
provide employment, each must set up world mar- 
kets, each must secure food for its population. At 
this very moment one of them seeks these things in 
defiance of a combined opposition. Germany would 
purge its blood and bide its time to show the super- 
iority of the Aryan race. On the other side of the 
world Japan faces the same problems, expansion, 
access to raw materials, markets, food. And Japan 
must wonder why nations and people criticize its 
actions when it takes, over by force what that coun- 
try regards as badly governed areas near at hand 
and brings them under control, whereas the United 
States did much the same thing less than a century 
ago with Texas, Arizona, New Mexico, and Cali- 
fornia, and England took up the white man's burden 
by doing the same thing in many different parts of 
the world. 

It is so difficult to realize the changes that sweep 
over the world, that new attitudes of mind condemn 
at a later period what once seemed proper and right. 
The issues are becoming clearer, better defined: one 
based on force, the other on freedom of action. For 
across the long stretch of history lies the Light of 
Him who is the Eternal Word. 

Jesus refused to use force. Moral issues cannot be 
determined by violence. His determined refusal to 
use force created more opposition than any other 
principle of His Kingdom. The Scribes and the 
Pharisees could not iinderstand His refusal to use 
force against sinners. No man ever condemned sin 
as did Christ Jesus. No one of this world ever knew 
how to deal with sinners as did He. The account 
given in St. John's Gospel is so in the spirit of His 
ministry. They brought Him the woman taken in 
adultery, stating that by law she should be stoned. 
What had He to say? After shaming them from 



His presence He said to her "Neither do I condemn 
thee. Go and sin no more." They could not un- 
derstand that and hated Him for it. They could 
not understand His friendliness for Samaritans. 
If He was friendly to them He could not be friends 
of theirs. When He came to Jerusalem on that last 
entrance He refused to organize His multitude of 
followers to defend Him. He went to the Cross, His 
Body to be broken, His blood to be shed, rather than 
resist by force. They could not understand that 
and repudiated Him as the Messiah. 

Multitudes of people today cannot understand that 
attitude and regard it as purely visionary, sheer 
sentiment. But it is the wisdom of the Eternal Word, 
the Prince of Peace. Let nations do what they 
think they must, but the duty of the Christian 
Church is clear. It is that principle in Christianity 
that States which would make themselves supreme 
dread the most. It is here they find the strongest 
opposition. Karl Marx taught his followers years 
ago that a supreme state, with a planned economy, 
could reach its goal only by the suppression of re- 
ligion. A supreme State cannot tolerate a free 
Church. Communism is therefore frankly based on 
atheism. 

Dictators can, and do, find it possible to compro- 
mise with religion, but only on terms which make 
the Church subservient to the State so that the 
Church does not interfere with the work of the 
State. The Dictator takes over the youth of th& 
land that their hands may be taught to war, their 
fingers to fight, and when the bells ring in Italy 
twenty million uniformed and disciplined present 
to the world a united nation. 

Germany can have its Church, supported even by 
taxation, but not a free Church, only that kind of 
a Church which is an arm of a totalitarian State. 
The mind reverts to that Charter of Anglo-Saxon 
liberties, out of which came our OAvn Declaration of 
Independence and Constitution, that Magna Carta, 
signed by the reluctant King John at Runnymede 
which declares, The English Church shall be free. 

It is within the range of possibilities of the future 
<that the Christian Church may become the last 
citadel of civil liberties, as it was the source from 
which these liberties emerged, for as Watterson 
stated years ago, "Democracy is a by-product of 
Christianity". 

Who will couquer the world — powers based on 
force, or powers enshrined in the principles of lib- 
erty and peace? "Not by might, nor by power, but 
by my spirit, saith the Lord of Hosts." There is 
still room for all of us on this earth of ours, still 
work for all, still food for all, if we know how to 
govern ourselves as children of the one Supreme God. 
(Continued on Page 13) 



THE MISSION HERALD 



The Mission Herald 

ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 

Published Monthly except July and August at 

507 Southern Building 
WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor 

REV. WALTER R. NOE 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 

RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 

MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 
Advertising rates furnished on application. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to receive 
their papers, should promptly notify the Business Man- 
ager, giving when necessary, both the old and new ad- 
dress. 



THE NEED FOR A FORWARD MOVEMENT 



By Clifford P. Morehouse 



(Condensed from The Living- Church Annual) 
Never before have so many decreases been indi- 
cated in the annual statistics of the Church as for 
1935. There are fewer postulants and candidates 
for Holy Orders, fewer parishes and missions. These 
decreases may indicate merely a consolidation of the 
work of the Church and a stiffening of the require- 
ments governing the admission of men to the theo- 
logical seminaries. 

But what should give us. cause for serious reflec- 
tion is the tremendous decrease in the number of bap- 
tisms and confirmations. The total number of bap- 
tisms reported in 1935 was only 63.056, a decrease 
of 3,099 over 1934. There was an even greater de- 
crease in the number of confirmations, Avhich was 
only 67.096 in 1935, being 5,466 less than those re- 
ported in 1934. These figures are a more accurate 
index to the state of the Church than the numbers 
of baptized persons (which has decreased 1,425) and 
of communicants (which has increased 26.178), be- 
cause the figures for baptized persons and communi- 
cants are approximations at best and vary from year 
to year in proportion to the diligence of rectors in 
pruning their parish lists. The figures for baptisms 
and confirmations, however, should lie accurate as 
they are taken from the official records of the vari- 
ous bishops and so are based upon an actual count. 

The statistics of our Church Schools also reveal 
a serious condition. In 1934 there were reported 
510.309 scholars and 61,502 teachers. In 1935 the 



number of scholars reported showed a decrease of 
nearly 4,000, being 506,400, and there were 550 less 
teachers, or a total of 60,952. 

Contributions to all Church purposes, which have 
been showing a steady decrease during ithe depres- 
sion years, appear to have been practically stopped 
in their precipitous downward flight, for the total 
reported in 1935 is only $150,928.55 less than the 
total for 1934. It will be recalled that the 1934 con- 
tributions were nearly three and a half million dol- 
lars less than those reported in 1933, while the drop 
the preceding year was in excess of six million 
dollars. 

Far more disquieting than the financial situation, 
it seems to us, is the unprecedented decrease in the 
number of baptisms and confirmations. What is 
the reason for this truly alarming situation? Are 
Church members failing in their duty of having 
their children baptized? It would seem so for the 
infant baptisms are 2,667 less in 1935 than in 1931. 
Is the Church making less of an appeal to adults 
outside her fold? That also would seem to be indi- 
cated by the decrease of 596 in adult baptisms and by 
the tremendous drop in confirmations. 

The Chttrch is a living organism. As such it 
cannot remain static; it must either go forward or 
slide backward. If the year's statistics indicate any 
thing at all they certainly seem to indicate a dan- 
gerous tendency to slide backward. Certainly we 
are urgently in need of a trjtfy spiritual Forward 
Movement. — The Messenger. 



LETTER FROM THE NATIONAL COUNCIL 



Rev. Walter R, Noe, 
Secretary, Diocese of East Carolina, 
507 Southern Building, 
Wilmington, North Carolina 

My dear Mr. Noe :— 

Dr Franklin has not yet returned to the office 
but we are looking forward to his arrival in New 
York on the 29th. From reports we have received 
from the field he is doing a splendid job in cement- 
ing the relationship of the field to the Church Mis 
isions House. I know that he will be grateful, on 
his return, for the splendid report we are able to 
give him of the cooperation of the D'oeese of East 
Carolina. The remittance of $3,927.40 enclosed in 
your letter of January 17'th pays the "Expectation" 
for the year 1935 in full. 

Accept our grateful appreciation of your cooper- 
ation and liberal support. 

Sincerely yours, 
THE NATIONAL COUNCIL 

J. E. WHITNEY, 
Assistant Treasurer 



JANUARY. 1936 



NOTES FROM FRIENDLY HALL 



The Student Branch of the Woman's Auxiliary 
met on December 2nd,, the day of our return from 
Thanksgiving holidays. We were very fortunate 
to have with us Mrs. Fred Outland who told us 
about the Forward Movement, and brought a beau- 
tiful and inspiring message to us as Auxiliary 
members. She also gave us a copy of the Children's 
Christmas Booklet published by the Forward Move- 
ment, from which we made a lovely creche for 
Friendly Hall. It is always a pleasure to have 
Mrs. Outland with us and to feel the spirit of faith 
and courage with which she leads the women of 
the Diocese in their work for our Lord. 

Our Corporate Communion for December was held 
on the morning of December 8th. It was very well 
attended and we enjoyed breakfast together after- 
wards in Friendly Hall. A small group also came 
the following Sunday morning for the early Cele- 
bration and breakfast. Those of us who partake 
of this opportunity to come together at the early 
hour feel that we are deriving great spiritual bene- 
fit from it. 

One of the happiest times we have had at Friendly 
Hall this year was on Saturday evening, December 
14th. The room was beautiful with its Christmas 
decorations. The creche was arranged very effect- 
ively on the long table. It was surrounded by 
branches of holly and pine. A small red light 
burned inside. The small white Christmas tree with 
its red decorations was on a table at the other end 
of the room. The windows were decorated with 
silver bells and holly. But the most beautiful spot 
in the room was the mantle. It was banked with 
holly and tall red tapers burned at the ends. la 
the center the small blue light cast its reflection 
upon the lovely Madonna which was given to Friend- 
ly Hall recently by Mrs. A. B. Hunter of Raleigh. 
The picture came from a gallery in Florence, Italy 
and is a copy of the painting by Fra Filippo Lippi. 
The antique gold-leaf frame brings out the coloring 
very effectively. We are very grateful to Mrs. 
Hunter for making such a lovely and appropriate 
gift to Friendly Hall. On Saturday evening we 
enjoyed tying up Christmas packages of food to be 
carried to a needy family, and after supper we sang 
Christmas carols. 

On Christmas Eve, Miss Andrews carried to the 
near-by prison camp magazines, stories cut out and 
mounted, and a nice basket of fruit from the Friend- 
ly Hall girls. We also helped two families with 
our food offering, a few articles of clothing, some 
bought and some given to us, and a few toys. In 
one of the families, living only a few miles from 



town, there are six children, so to them we carried 
the creche from Friendly Hall. The children were 
delighted with it, but, sad to say, they had never 
heard of the Christ Child. 

MARY TARRY 
Publicity Chairman of the Student 
Branch of the Woman's Auxiliarv 



EMMANUEL PARISH, FARMVILLE, HOLDS 
ANNUAL DINNER 



Members of Emmanuel parish enjoyed a Get-To- 
gether dinner in the Rotary rooms, at which time 
the reetoi*, Rev. Jack R. Rountree, presided and 
addressed his parishioners on "The Church as a 
Family Group." 

Reports and outlooks for the year were given by 
Dr. D. S. Morrill, senior warden, Mrs. J. H. Darden, 
retiring president of the Woman's Auxiliary, J. W. 
Joyner, superintendent of the Sunday School, Mrs. 
C. T. Dixon, Church treasurer and incoming presi- 
dent of the Auxiliary, Miss Edna Foust Harris, repre- 
senting the Altar Guild, and Mrs. J. L. Shackleford, 
the choir. 

A Christmas scene in miniature, together with 
tall red tapers formed the table decoraions, and a 
number of Christmas carols were sung during the 
evening in celebration of the approaching birthday 
of the King. 



GOOD SHEPHERD, TOLAR-HART, 
FAYETTEVILLE 



At the first meeting of the new year, the Ladies' 
Guild took an inventory to find out how much had 
been accomplished in the eighteen months since its 
organization, with the following result: 

A new carpet on the aisle of the Church, new 
hymn books for the Church, the vestibule doors 
covered, the pews of the Church varnished, the 
parish house given two general cleanings, the parish 
house swept each week, several wreaths of flowers 
given, several potted plants given the sick, several 
baskets of fruit given the sick, several baskets of 
groceries given the needy, three layettes given to 
mothers. 

Regular weekly meetings are held in the parish 
house with missionary programs and discussions. 

The only way of raising funds has been monthly 
dues, a Birthday Box, selling kitchen sponges and 
have given one play. 

MRS. MACY REAVES, Secretary 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD 



"BORN FROM ABOVE" 



By Rev. George F. Hill, Rector of Christ Church 
Elizabeth City 



Ex. 32:1 "When the people saw that Moses de- 
layed to come down out of the mount, the people 
gathered themselves together unto Aaron and said 
unto him, 'Up, make us gods which shall go before 
us, for as for this Moses — we wot not what has be- 
come of him.' " 

If we are satisfied with ourselves, content with 
what we are, — our ideals, our religious status, our 
moral code, our personal characters, — then what I 
shall say this morning will mean nothing to you. 
If, however, it was your purpose in attending wor- 
ship this morning, — not just because of custom, habit 
or because of duty or love for this hallowed place, 
but being dissatisfied with your present religious 
status, not content to remain at your present dis- 
tance from God, and coming to service this morning 
you come with a purpose of spiritual advancement, 
to learn how you might serve God better and how 
you might be more Christian, more like God, — then 
this message will not have been in vain. 

Those who are seeking God, it will help ; those 
who are satisfied with themselves, it will be so 
much sounding brass. 

Moses, by God's direction had led the people of 
Israel out of Egyptian bondage. God had made it 
possible for them to progress from slavery to free 
men. He had protected them from their enemies. 
He had given them food and water in the desert. 
He guided them to Sinai. At Sinai God had taught 
the first fundamentals of true religion. A religion, 
not like the Egyptians, but a quickening, life giving, 
progessive religion. 

What was this fundamental of religion? 

God led those people out of Egypt to make of 
them a peculiar people. — one sot apart to learn true, 
life giving, progressive religion, and who, after hav- 
ing learned their lesson, were to give this religion 
to all the world. 

What was this true religion that God taught them? 

In Egypt they had seen religion practiced: a state 
religion. Isis and Osiris and other minor gods and 
goddesses. Thoy had seen great majestic buildings 
erected for their worship. They had seen their 
beautiful religious ceremonies. They had seen that 
religion bountifullv provided for financially. Why 



was there to be another religion taught these children 
of Israel? Why was not the religion of the Egyp- 
tians good enough? 

What was this religion that God taught them? 

The first fundamental principle was that God is 
a spirit. That God is not the flesh pots of Egypt, 
sticks, stones, brass or gold. These all change with 
time. God is the same yesterday, today and forever. 
These disintegrate and after years are wholly gone. 
God is eternal. God is a spirit. With this firist 
step or fundamental thought in religion, God lifted 
man above the beasts of the field. 

The beast of the field is aware only of what it 
sees, hears, smells, tastes and to\iches. God is cer- 
tainly more than that, higher than that, or else God 
is but His own material creation, subject to the 
manipulation of man's whim. God is a spirit. God 
is of that element or plane of being that creates 
matter: spirit that is master of the created world 
of the five senses : the creator, not the created : 
higher, not lower. 

The merchant has many kinds of goods upon his 
shelves. They are not ends in themselves. They 
are mere mediums of exchange — articles of matter 
that he changes for other articles of matter which 
he changes again iuto other things — pleasure, edu- 
cation, comfort. 

So the true spirit: God. The spirit as master of 
the world of matter uses this created material for 
special purposes; He shifts, changes, moves this or 
that piece of matter for spiritual ends. They are 
not ends in themselves. 

This was to them a hard lesson at Sinai. It is a 
hard lesson. They had trouble in learning it. Many 
of us have never learned it today. 

God is a spirit. After they were taught this 
first great fundamental truth, God called Moses to 
meet Him on the mountain top. While Moses re- 
mained away for some time — see what the people of 
Israel did. They built a golden calf to worship. 
Why? Because they wanted something they could 
see and feel- some definite, concrete thing of the 
material world. A spiritual God could not be seen 
and felt. Hence something they could see and feel, 
something they knew- -a golden calf. They could 
see the golden sheen of that; they could see Egypt's 
god as their own. They were at home with some- 
thing to bow down to and serve that they could se^ 
and feel. 

But what significance, we might ask, is this story 
of Sinai's calf god to us today of the twentieth cen- 
tury? This is the significance, an all important 
significance that largely explains our impotence to- 
day as Christians. 

Let me illustrate. You belong to a club. The 
object of that club is to make money to buy clothes 



JANUARY, 1936 



11 



for some poor family who lives a few doors back 
of you. The president of that club is a very dear 
friend of yours. He is personally attractive, one 
who draws people to him, makes friends easily and 
is altogether lovable. You work hard in that club, 
giving a great deal of your time and money. You 
also see what your efforts have done toward that 
poor family. Now suppose that attractive presi- 
dent's term is over. Another is elected in his place. 
And though he is just as .'nterested and perhaps more 
so, in the club's cause than his predecessor, he is 
not attractive personally, is rather distant, hard to 
make friends with. Also the family you are helping 
this year, lives in another state, many miles away. 
Will you work as hard? Will you give as much of 
your time and money as before? Yet the cause and 
purpose of the club is the same. Do you under- 
stand? God is a spirit and we must worship Him 
in spirit and in truth. 

God calls us to give. I Jut God is invisible. God, 
we often find, is hard to know. It takes effort 
God calls us to give to missions. Sending our hard 
earned money somewhere we cannot see or feel. 
Are we as interested? We should be if we have 
risen above those coif worshippers at the foot of 
Sinai. 

Are we mere beasts of burden having no appre- 
ciation of ought but of the things we see and fee) " 
These things perish but God is eternal. God is a 
spirit. 

God's religion is spiritual. Walking in the faith 
and works of God is not a material process or action 
but a sweetening of the invisible soul of man, giving 
him that peace which the material world cannot 
give. Giving him invisible power over material lusts 
and sin. Providing him with an immaterial some- 
thing that makes him love and serve his fellow man, 
not for what he can get out of them for himself, 
but because his spiritual God is spiritually within. 

Will material powder and shot, hate, jealousy 
and selfishness ever bring peace to the earth? Will 
<they ever bring the kingdom of heaven to pass? 
The powers of the spirit can. "Man doth not live 
by bread alone but by every word that proceedeth 
out of the mouth of God." 

Do we give and live only for the changing tem- 
poral things of earth or for the power of God, the 
creator? 

Christianity as the spiritual religion taught by a 
spiritual God is 'the salvation of the world, with 
power to adjust material creation to man's happi- 
ness. Will we be content with a hut when a palace 
may be had? 

Referring ao:ain to the illustration about your 
imaginary club where you worked hard and your 
interest was high as long as the president was so 



likable and then your interest waned when the presi- 
dent was not so attractive — 

As Christian men and women pledging ourselves 
to believe in Christ as The Way, The Truth and 
The Life, do we regulate our interest, our service, 
our giving of time and money to God's cause, Chris- 
tianity, in proportion to our interest in some mun- 
dane thing? Do we intelligent people give ten cents 
to carry on God's plan if we do not like the music 
the organist plays, the way the choir sings, the ser- 
mons the preacher preaches, or there is some member 
of the Church you know to be a hypocrit? But 
give ten times ten of money and interest if all these 
material pawns, temporal and changing, happen to 
meet your approval? Do you make God a slave to 
your like or dislike of some of his earthly creations? 

Have Ave grown in intellect and religious education 
so little since Sinai's days that we cannot worship 
and express our faith and service in a spiritual God 
without there being set up for us some visible god 
like the golden calf of the Sinai children of Israel? 

Cannot we of the twentieth century appreciate 
spiritual power, Christianity at work, in the lives 
of men here and in foregn fields without demanding 
an accounting in returns of material values? "God 
moves in a mysterious way His wonders to perform." 
Mysterious only so far as matter is concerned. The 
spiritual religion of Christ works mysteriously in 
the lives of men, Caucasian or Mongolian, in ehang 
ing invisibly his points of view toward a materia' 
world. 

"Ye must be born a Tain" said Christ to the 
materialist Nicodemus. Nicodemus, like many of 
us, so shrouded in matter and material thinking, that 
he could only perceive a rebirth as a physical act. 
"How can a man be born when he is old" asked 
the credulous Pharisee, and so also asks tens of 
thousands of his followers. Jesus continues: "Ver- 
ily I say unto you, unless one is born of water and 
the spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of 
heaven. What is born of the flesh is flesh ; what is 
born of the spirit is spirit. Do not wonder at me 
telling you "you must be born from above." 

Is it not but the simplest sort, of fact that life's 
values are in proportion to our interest in things of 
the spirit? When our hearts, minds, bodies and 
souls are focussed only on matter — bread, clothes, 
money, pleasure,— all secondary things,, all subser- 
vient to their creator, we are worshipping the shadow 
rather than He that casts the shadow? We fill our 
bellies with the husks that the swine eat and find 
little or no satisfaction in life and never will until 
like the prodigal, we come to ourselves. 

"He that is born of the flesh is flesh." "Th? 
first man Adam was made a living soul: the last 
Adam, Christ, was made a quickening, life-givin? 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD 



spirit." Matter undergoes continued change, but 
"whatever its transformation ilt is always matter. 
The world alone can only beget things of the world, 
and the world reaps what it sows. He that lives 
but for what the world can be made to give him 
will die a pauper, for his wealth consists in temporal, 
changing matter, which he must leave behind. 
Wealth, friends, food and raiment. "Seek ye first 
the kingdom of God and his righteousness and all 
these things shall be added unto you." 

Many modern people are often like the merchant 
in the fable, so busy arranging and rearranging his 
wares on his shelves, he never had time to wait on 
Ins customers. He went bankrupt. Many of us are 
so intent on pursuing material ends that we have 
no time left for higher spiritual enlightenment. The 
dust on the furniture, the breakfast dishes, dinner 
cooking, the Sunday paper, the labor of the day 
before, — all press so heavily on our material con- 
sciousness that we have no time to worship God in 
spirit. And what is so foolish for intelligent men 
is that we seldom if ever hold the two up to the 
light of reason, and weigh the value of one against 
the other. To the materialist any excuse is sufficient 
to outweigh God and the spiritual world. 

Just as long as our chief interest is in material 
values, life will be below par and our contentment 
will ever be at the whim of the highest material 
bidder. When we come to ourselves and make our 
chief interest God's Plan, Spiritual Values, then 
life rises above par and begins to pay a dividend 
in peace and contentment, for then we are getting 
somewhere — we. are moving forward. 

Behold the odds against a kingdom of heaven on 
earth! Man may dine forever upon the swill from 
the trough ; he may forever bow down to a material 
golden calf; he may forever blindfold himself to 
everything but the idols carved by his hands and 
live in a world that can breed only the bitter fruits 
of history. 

But it lies within his power to put first things 
first, to live for, through and in the spirit, to cause 
the spiritual to dominate the lesser material world, 
until "they shall beat their swords into plowshares 
and their spears into pruning hooks; nation shall 
not lift up sword against any nation, neither shall 
they learn war any more." When man shall learn 
by experience that "it is more blessed to give than 
it is to receive," that love is more powerful than any 
material element of the laboratory, that man is a 
spiritual being in kinship with God, when man 
comes to himself he will establish the kingdom of: 
heaven on earth. For then we will realize that 
working for the kingdom of heaven on earth and 
exchangng the things of earth for it. to make such 
a heaven here was our original ideal which we had 



lost in blind and unsatisfying pursuit of the material. 
We will then nave swapped the lesser for the greater, 
the glitter for the gold, the shadow for the substance. 
We will at last have come home. 

Come home. 

You and I have reached Sinai. We will either 
give our full allegiance to a visible man-created god 
and beget continued strife and unhappiness, wan- 
dering and wondering all our day's about life's 
troubles, or, on reaching Sinai we will lift our eyes 
above created things to the heights and before the 
invisible creative Spirit accept His rule as Lord of 
creat'on. king of kings, and through Him and with 
Him make our home a heaven. 

Let us pray: Heavenly Father, we thank Thee 
for Thy patience with us. We, who have followed 
so long lost in our own circling foot prints. Help us 
to lift our eyes to higher levels. To see Thee as 
Thou art : the Lord of life, the Light of the world, 
Creator and Father of wandering men — slaves to our 
inventions. We pray Thee to help us see that Thou 
alone art the power of salvation, Thou alone the 
giver of all good and perfect gifts, through Jesus 
Christ, our Lord. Amen. 



"THE WITNESS" TO FEATURE ARTICLES ON 
LATIN AMERICA 



Co-operating with the Woman's Auxiliary that is 
promoting a study of the mission fields of Latin 
America this Lent, THE WITNESS, national weekly 
of the Church, is to present a series of articles 
written by present-day leaders in these fields. Each 
article is to give a graphic description of the coun- 
try, the people and the work of the Church, with 
a look into the future. They are being written 
especially for discussion and study groups. The 
writers and their subjects are as follows: 

Mexico, Bishop Efrain Salinas y Velasco ; Cuba, 
Archdeacon J. H. Townsend; Haiti, Rev. Felix D. 
Juste; Canal Zone, Archdeacon S. A. Wragg; Puerto 
Rico, Bishop C. B. Colmore; Virgin Islands, Rev. 
Hubert M. Pigott ; Brazil, Bishop M. M. Thomas. 

In addition to this timely missionary series, there 
is also to be a series of eight articles by Bishop 
Irving P. Johnson of Colorado on the general sub- 
ject "A Christian Voyage", sotting forth the Chris- 
tian attitude toward Discipleship, Stewardship, Fel- 
lowship, Worship. Sonship and Partnership. 

THE WITNESS may be had in bundles of ten 
or more copies to one address for 3 cents a cor>v, 
or a siiiQ'le six months subscription is but $1. The 
address of the paper is 6140 Cottage Grove Avenue, 
Chicago. There are eight Lenten numbers, the first 
being Februarv 20th. 






JANUARY, 1936 



13 



ST. STEPHEN'S, GOLDSBORO 



At our vestry meeting January 1st, the following 
offices were filled with the following men- 

Senior Warden, Mr. George C. Royall; Junior 
Warden, Mr. John Hicks ; Secretary-Treasurer, Mr. 
W. Easley Pace; Assistant Secretary-Treasurer, Mr. 
James N. Smith. 

Committees: On Memorials, Mr. Fitzhugh Lee, Mr. 
William Davis, Mr. James Smith. Auditing, Mr. 
Fitzhugh Lee. Mr. Frank Fagan, Mr. James Smith. 

G. S. G. 



DEFEAT MOVE TO SEAT WOMEN ON CHURCH 
VESTRY 



Women of St. Stephen's Join Men in Voting 
Resolution Down 



By an overwhelming vote, St. Stephen's Episcopal 
Church, Coldsboro, in annual parish session Sunday 
morning defeated a resolution providing that three 
women be elected to the Church vestry. Vote of the 
women was preponderantly against the resolution. 

Twelve men were elected to the Church vestry. 
Named for one year : W. E. Pace, E. E. Eutsler, F. F. 
Fagan and D. W. Davis. Named for two years: 
G. C. Royall, J. E. F. Hicks, H. F. Lee and James N. 
Smith. Named for three years: George W. Hamer, 
W. A. Royall, James T. Jeffreys, and Arnold Borden. 

The annual business session was held following 
the regular morning prayers. 

Reports were made as follows: Treasurer, W. E. 
Pace; Memorials, Kenneth C. Royall, Every Member 
•Canvass, F. F. Fagan; Woman's Activities, Mrs. W. 
H. Smith, and Condition of the parish, Rev. George 
S. Gresham; the rector. 

Mr. Royall reported on memorial windows back 
of the altar for three deceased members of the 
Church, Miss Sue CCollier, Miss Corinne Dortch and 
Mrs. Z M. L. Jeffreys. 



grand nephews of the late Miss Sue Collier; and 
James Jeffreys and George Collins Jeffreys, grand- 
sons of the late Mrs. Annie Hauser Jeffreys. 

The windows, which are placed in the east end of 
the Church over the altar, are beautifully designed 
in rich colors, with blue predominating. They were 
made in New York under the supervision of George 
Payne, who visited Goldsboro last May to get the 
setting and other details for construction of the 
windows. 

One of the windows is the Annunciation, dedicated 
in memoiy of Mrs. Jeffreys. Next window has the 
scene of The Nativity, dedicated in memory of Miss 
Collier. The third window depicts The Presenta- 
tion in The Temple, and was dedicated in memory of 
Miss Dortch. 

The following were confirmed by Bishop Darst 
at the impressive Confirmation Service : 

William B. Cobb, Jr., Hugh Dortch, Jr., Cecil Ray 
Willis, Jr., Lillian B. Johnson, Mildred Borden Lee r 
Sarah Copeland Jeffreys, Annie Jeffreys Carmichael, 
Helen Williamson Moye, and Dr. and Mrs. Clem Ham. 

After the Confirmation Service Rev. George S. 
Gresham, the rector, called the attention of the 
congregation to the fact that two granddaughters 
of the late Mrs. Jeffreys, a grandnephew of the late 
Miss Collier, and a grandnephew of the late Miss 
Dortch were among those confirmed. He also pre- 
sented each member of the class with a certificate 
of their confirmation, signed by the Bishop and 
the rector. 



BISHOP DARST DEDICATES MEMORIAL 
WINDOWS AT ST. STEPHEN'S CHURCH 



Tribute to the "'three shining souls" in whos^ 
memories the windows were installed was paid by 
Bishop Thomas C. Darst at the dedication of three 
memorial windows during the morning service at 
St. Stephen's Episcopal Church, Goldsboro. A class 
of eleven was confirmed by Bishop Darst. 

Following the brief but impressive dedication ser- 
vice the windows were unveiled. Assisting in the 
unveiling were Hugh Dortch, Jr., and Macon Mi- 
ch aux, grand nephews of the late Miss Corinne 
Dortch ; William Borden Cobb, Jr., and Jack Cobb, 



Address on the Missionary Motive 

(Continued from Page 7) 

As between the continued use of force for con- 
quest in this world and the purpose of Christ there 
can be little question in one of prophetic insight. 
The expansion of any national powers, dedicated 
to force, means in the end inevitable world conflict. 
We are simply done for if this is the only way. But 
it is not the only way, nor the wise way, nor the 
human way, nor the divine way. 

The Christian Church, if true to her Master, has 
in its keeping the only way, the way of teaching and 
heab'ner. the way of the spread of the Gospel among 
the peoples of the world, the way of the Eternal 
Word, always the way which we poor humans are 
slow to recognize, the way of sacrifice, the way of 
peace. 

Shall we surrender now, let our zeal flag or our 
faith fail? 

Now is the time for leadership — now the testing 

time of courage, now the time to go forward, not 

with battle planes and military tanks, not with 

" reeking tube and iron shard ," but with the Cross 

of Christ, as faithful stewards of the mystery of God 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD 



IS RURAL CHURCH WORK WORTHWHILE? 



By Mrs. Alex. C. D. Woe 



In 1866, the Rev. Samuel Swan Barber went to 
Hyde County,, to begin missionary work. At that 
time, there were only two communicants of the 
Episcopal Church in the entire territory, sixty miles 
long and some thirty miles wide. These two, Mrs. 
Tolbert Selby and Mrs. Silvester Gibbs were in 
Lake Landing township, in the lower end of the 
county. Predjudice against the Church was every- 
where evident and in places very bitter. People 
considered our communion a link of the Roman 
Catholic and a cold welcome, if any awaited it, and 
there seemed little chance of its taking root in so 
unfriendly a soil. 

Added to the handicap of hostile surroundings, 
the missionary was without personal funds to cany 
on the work, and received very little from the Dio- 
cese or other outside sources, and was compelled to 
farm and teach school in order to furnish necessities 
for himself and family. The combined work was 
very hard and trying. Preaching stations, were 
from twenty to thirty or forty miles apart. Roads 
were narrow, muddy and almost impassable during 
half of the year. The only means of transportation, 
horseback, wagon or buggy. 

Mr. Barber preached and held service in homes, 
and when possible, in schoolhouses ; distributed tracts 
and prayer books, and labored daily to make friendly 
contacts and kill prejudice. 

Congregations were small and most of the books 
were burned or otherwise destroyed, but some seed 
fell on good ground and began to multiply. He 
served forty years in the one field, established four 
Churches: St. George's, Lake Landing; All Saints', 
Fairfield; St. John's, Makleyville, which was later 
moved to Sladesville ; and Calvary, Swan Quarter: 
and made the Episcopal Church one of the strongest 
numerical and spiritual forces in the county: practi- 
cally killed religious prejudice, and during his lat- 
ter days was one of the most beloved citizens. He 
was known throughout the county as "Uncle Bar- 
ber". 

Others built upon the foundations laid by Mr. 
Barber and the influence of the Church has greatly 
aided the progress of an outstanding rural popula- 
tion. If this were all, the work, regardless of hard- 
ships and sacrifices would certainly be many times 
worth the cost, but no spiritual enterprise, is con- 
fined to the borders of its home base. The Church 
in Hyde County has been a great feeder to town 
and city churches and its influence has reached far. 
It hns been said that nearly every state in the Union 
has in it one or more persons from Hyde and many 



of them have gone from this Church. Nearby towns 
and our State as a whole have been greatly benefitted 
by this work. Two influential ministers, both sons 
of Mr. Barber, went to serve in other fields. One 
was Lev. Hobart Barber of Augusta, Georgia and 
the other Dr. Milton A Barber of Christ Church, 
Raleigh, N. 0. Others have gone out as teachers 
in the public schools, as nurses and to fill other 
worthwhile positions in Slate and Nation. 

Rev. Messrs. Milton and Hobart Barber served 
churches in such distant places as Texas and Michi- 
gan. Both were present at meetings of General 
Convention, where by contact, voice or vote, they 
affected the operation of the Church throughout the 
world, and these two, with their father, ministered 
to many thousands of their fellows, helping them 
over the hard places of life, and preparing them 
for the journey to that house not made with hands, 
eternal in the heavens. The influence of a difficult 
missionary enterprise will doubtless extend through 
time and far into eternity. Rural Church Work 
is Worthwhile. A thousand times yes. 



Annual Meeting- of the Woman's Auxiliary 

(Continued from Page 5) 
ward; there is no middle ground, no standing still."' 
The Church is sounding the trumpet call to "Go 
Forward ! ' ' 

The session Thursday began with a Corprate Com- 
munion at 7:30 at which time, the offering for the 
Bishop's Fund was presented, which amounted to 
$507.00. The celebrants were Bishop Darst and the 
Rev. Mr. Halleck. 

During the business session which opened at ten 
o'clock, the Chairmen of the Departments presented 
a Forward Outlook for their work. 

Miss Robcrson, City Mission Worker, and Rev. 
Alexander Miller of the Diocesan Field Department 
reported on work done last year and outlined a 
Forward Looking Program. 

The nominating committee recommended Mrs. 
John A. Guion for re-election as treasurer. She 
was unanimously elected. Mrs. Sidney Ward was 
installed as Chairman of the Church Periodical Club 
by Bishop Darst. 

The Bishop in his closing address highly con- 
mended the Auxiliary and said he was particularly 
consc'ous of the spirituality of this meeting. He 
deplored the fact that there had been a falling off 
in Church School teachers, scholars and baptisms. 
We must come back to a realization that the chil- 
dren must be taught, that those who come after 
may have a stairway on which to walk to higher 
things. 

Publicity Department 



JANUARY, 1936 



15 



IN MEMORIAM 

ALEXANDER COOPER— 1857-1935 



In the passing of Alexander Cooper, The Church of 
the Good Shepherd, Tolar- Hart, Fayetteville, lost a 
loyal member. 

He was faithful in Church attendance and Super- 
intendent of the Sunday School until declining 
health a year ago. 



LENDO BARRETT 



Good Shepherd, Tolar-Hart, Fayetteville has suf- 
fered an irreparable loss in the untimely death of 
Lendo Barrett. 

Not yet nineteen years of agei, he served efficiently 
as Church Treasurer, the past year. 



Ever faithful in Church and Sunday School at- 
tendance, and an active and capable member of the 
Young People's Service League, his faithfulness to 
duties entrusted to him was an inspiration to his 
co-workers and an invaluable aid to the work of the 
Church. 



Four subjects which occupied the moost time in the 
Council meeting are still receiving further study for 
action in February or April. They are young peo- 
ple's work, work among Negroes, field department 
activity, financial provision for 1936. 



The financial outlook for 1936 is serious and of 
course is receiving the most careful study by the 
Council officers in conference with all the Bishops. 
The budget for 1936 must be balanced and adopted 
at the February meeting. 



STATEMENT OF THE AMOUNTS PAID BY THE PARISHES A\'D MISSIONS FOR DIOCESAN AND GENERAL 

CHURCH WORK, JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1935. 



CONVOCATION OF WILMINGTON. 



Parishes 

Beaufort, St. Paul's 

Clinton, St. Paul's 

Fayetteville, St. John's 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 

Hope Mills, Christ Church 

Kinston, St. Mary's , 

New Bern, Christ Church 

Red Springs, St. Stephen's ....... 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' 

Southport, St. Philip's 

Wilmington. Good Shepherd . . . 

Wilmington, St. James' 

Wilmington St. John's 

Wilmington, St, Paul's 



Organized Missions. 

Burgaw, St. Mary's 

Faison, St. Gabriel's . . 



Parishes 

Aurora, Holy Cross 

Avden. St. James' 

Bath, St. Thomas' 

Belhaven, St. James' 

Bonnerton, St. John's 

**Chocowini'ty, Trinity 

Columbia, St. Andrew's 

Creswell, St. David's 

Edenton, St. Paul's 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church 

Parmville. Emmanuel 

**Oatesville, St. Mary's 

**Greenville, St. Paul's 

Orifton, St. John's 

Hamilton, St. Martin's 

*Hertford, Holy Trinity . . . 

Jpssama, Zion 

Bake Landing, St. George's .. 
P'vmoiith. Gra^e Church . . . . 

**Roper, St. Luke's 

Washington, St Peter's 

Williamston, Advent 



Parishes 

Fayetteville, St. Joseph's 
N^w Pern. St. Cynrian's . . 
Wilmington, St. Mark's . . 



Organised Missions 

Belhaven. St. Mary's 

■pM^ntnn St .Tohn-Evanerelist 
Elizabeth City, St. Phi'ip's .. 

Goldsboro, St. Andrew's 

T^'n=tnn, St. Augustine's 
Washington, St Paul's 



Expec- 


Paid to 


tations 


Jan. 11 -3« 


365.20 


151.85 


50.00 


50.00 


2,150 00 


1,607.26 


1.000.00 


563.35 


60.00 


60.00 


1.000.0J 


1,000.00 


2.125.00 


1,485.89 


55.00 


55.00 


200.00 


113.13 


169.60 


169.60 


371.40 


371.40 


9.781.50 


8,430.85 


2,031.60 


1,781,25 


1,200.00 


663.19 


35.00 


30.22 


65.00 


65.00 


CON VOCATION 


250.00 


122.88 


300.J0 


150.00 


35.00 


2S.42 


250.00 


33.06 


100 00 


61.78 


100.00 




200.00 


178.00 


300.00 


159.21 


1,488.98 


1,488.98 


1,008.76 


925 13 


238.20 


238.20 


128.00 


22.03 


1.356 20 


1,264.69 


200.00 


126.35 


65.00 


(65.00 


326.55 


241.67 


100.00 


ion.00 


200.00 


70.30 


200 no 


2 r, n no 


75.00 


60.65 


1,500.00 


1,500.65 


100.00 


111.19 


OCATION 


OF COLO! 


104.00 


107.60 


420 no 


420 00 


140.00 


140.00 


105.00 


33.32 


] oi nn 


]ni no 


20.15 


20.15 


fin "n 


60.00 


75.00 


75.00 


120.00 


48.61 



T.nmhertnn. Trinity 

North West, All Soul's 

Pikeville. St. George's ... 
Trenton. Grace Church . . . 

Vanceboro, St. Paul's 

Whitevllle, Grace Church .. 
Wrightsville, St. Andrews* 



Unorganized Missions. 

Jasper, St. Thomas' 

Pollocksville, Mission 

Wilmington, Delgado Mission 



Paroehial Missions. 

Campbellton, St. Philip's . . 
Tolar-Hart, Good Shepherd 



Total 



OF EDENTON 

Windsor, St Thomas'... 
**Winton, St. John's ... 
Woodville, Grace Church 



Organized Missions 

A^oskie. St. Thomas' .... 

♦Fairfield. All Saints' ... 

Murfreesboro, St. Barnabas' 

Koxobel. St. Mark's 

Sladesville, St. John's .... 

Snow Hill. St. Barnabas' . , 
Sunbury, St. Peter's ...... 

Swan Quarter, Calvary .... 

Winterville, St. Luke's 
Yeatesville, St. Matthew's 

Unorganized Missions. 

Avooa, Holy Innocents' .. 
Camden, St. Joseph's 



Total 



Expec- 


Paid to 


tations 


Jan. 11-30 


174 00 


174.00 


10.00 


10.04 


20.00 


20.00 


15 00 


15.50 


30.00 


30.00 


100.00 


100. on 


6.00 


6.00 


20.00 




20.00 


5.00 


10.00 


15.00 


25.00 


8.37 


70.00 


72.68 


$ 21,159.30 


$17,054.58 


225.00 


179.9" 


100.00 


48.77 


150.00 


150.00 


55.no 


55.00 


10.00 


10.00 


30.00 


47.00 


9"> ns 


92.08 


10.00 




100 nn 


100.00 


42.00 


42.00 


20.00 


20 00 


125.00 


125.00 


20.00 


20.00 


80.00 


80.00 


10.00 


5.00 


$ 9,590.77 


$8,120.94 



Unorganised Missions. 

Aurora, St. .Tilde's 

Beaufort, St. Clement's 

Oroenville, St. Andrew's ........ 

Haddock's Cross Roads, St. Stephen's 

Poner. St. Ann's 

Wilmington, "Brooklyn" Mission,. . 
Wrightsville, St. Augustine's 



43.00 


7.00 


40 "0 


33.80 


30.00 


9. no 


30.ni 


30.00 


20.00 


7.00 


20.00 


18 50 


20.00 


18.50 



Total 

Grand Total 



% 1,354.15 $1,129.4S 

$32,104.22 $26,305.00 



* Pinal payment made since closing of books. 
** Addit'onal payments made since closing of books. 



16 



'HE MISSION HERALD 



VIRGINIA EPISCOPAL 
SCHOOL 

LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 

Prepares boys for College and University. Splen- 
did environment and excellent corps of teachers. 
High standard in scholarship and athletics. Healthy 
and beautiful location in the mountains of Virginia. 
Charges exceptionally low. For catalog apply to: 

REV. OSCAR deWOLF RANDOLPH 

RECTOR 



4... 



ELL & C/WSEY 

FOR SERVICE 
Good=Year Tires Exide Batteries 

Quaker State Lubrication 

Telephone 827 12th and Market Sts 

Wilmington, N. C. 



COMMUNION BREAD 
IN SHEETS OR WAFERS. MONTHLY 
SUPPLIES ARE BEST. Address Mrs. T. T. 
Walsh, Walterboro, South Carolina. 






Form of Bequest 



i 



I hereby, give, devise, and bequeath to [ 
the Trustees of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church in the Diocese of East Carolina i 



to be held by them in trust tor. 






* 



4-PLY CROCHET YARN 



S 



ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Conducted for Negro Youth under the auspices of the Epis- 
copal Church. 

A four year accredited College Course is offered, leading to 
degrees of B. A. and B. S., including Pre-Medical work and 
Teacher Training for State High School Teachers' certificates. 

A College Preparatory Department, Training School for Nurses 
and School for Religious and Social Workers are connected with 
the College. 

Thorough training, healthy environment, Christian influences. 
For Catalog and information write — 

The Registrar 
ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE, RALEIGH, N. C. 






PREVENT COLDS 



USE 






VAPOR 



n nose r.\ va 

Hurene drops AND rhirene salve 

Made in East Carolina, — Used Everywhere 



c mK 

WRITE US FOR SPECIAL CLUB 
RATES IN 50 LB. LOTS 

TOLAR, HART & HOLT IV 

FAYETTEVILLE, N. C 



+ 



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. .*. ., .... .... I.., .,,. .„ _ .... 1 ... 

i 



Meares Insurance Agency 

815 Murehison Building 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



+ 



*.— 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 
JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

An Episcopal School for girls— Have your daughter 
receive her education in a church school. 

Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, B. S., 
Principal 

Saint Mary's offers 4 years' High School and 2 
years' College work all fully accredited by the South- 
ern Association. Also courses in Music, Art, Ex- 
pression, Home Economics, and Business. 

20-Acre Campus. Gym and Field Sports. Tennis. 
Indoor Tiled Swimming Pool. Horseback 
R'dinjr. Golf 

A. W. TUCKER, Business Manager. 



>^3.oV 



F 34 '36 

Jan. 3^ fl 

Library, U. ■• <?• 
Ch&pel Hill, H. C, 



u ^ c 




THE MISSION HERALD 



NOTES FROM FRIENDLY HALL 




January, in contrast to December, was a very quiet 
month at Friendly Hall. Bad weather, sickness, and 
absences for various reasons were responsible. 

The most outstanding event of the month was the 
Auxiliary meeting on January 6th. The Rev. George 
Gresham braved the fog and came over from Golds- 
boro to speak to us. His talk on China, our mission 
work there, in schools, hospitals, etc., was most in- 
teresting. Afterward we had the privilege of ask- 
ing questions which developed into a discussion of 
China and Missions in general. 

Publicity Chairman of the Student 
Branch of the Woman's Auxiliary 



ST. PAUL'S, GREENVILLE 



St. Paul's Senior Branch of the Woman's Aux- 
iliary herewith report two interesting program meet- 
ings, one held just before the Christmas holidays, 
the other on January 10th. 

A special invitation was extended to every member 
of the Auxiliary to attend the Christmas meeting. 
The program was as follows: A reading of Biblical 
selections appropriate to the season by the presi- 
dent, Mrs. Richard Williams, prayers by the presi- 
dent; special music consisting of a solo by Mrs. Worth. 
Wicker and other music by Misses Bessie Brown 
and Hennie Long and Mrs. Curtis Perkins. Miss 
Elizabeth Andrews presided at the piano. 

Miss Hennie Long explained how the Forward 
Movement Commission had arranged a pamphlet to 
assist the Church School teachers and the parents 
in training the children to observe Christmas in a 
churchly way. 

The Rev. Worth Wicker spoke to the group, his 
subject beine- "Christmas Customs". He explained 
the origin, although pagan, they had been Christian- 
ized and how we had learned to love the customs 
and symbols of the early Church. 

All present joined in singing that much loved 
hymn "Holy Night". 

After this beautiful closing, our president invited 
us to enjoy with her a little surprise party, a beau- 
tifully licrhted Christmas tree Avith gifts for every 
member of the Auxiliary. 



At the January meeting there was an especially 
arranged program. Each member of the parish and 
many others were invited to this meeting. 

The special guest for the occasion was Mrs. David 
Reddick from Toronto, Canada, a girlhood friend of 
the president, Mrs. Richard Williams. Mrs. Reddick 
gave a talk on "The Compulsion of Service. I 
must work while it is day." It was an earnest 
message from a devoted Christian woman. She said 
that she did not expect to pass this way again, but 
the memory of her devotion will linger in the hearts 
of those who heard her. 

Out of town guests included Mrs. George W. Lay, 
Chapel Hill, Mrs. Garret, South Boston, Va., and 
Mrs. W. T. Bost, Robersonville. 

The president, assisted by Mrs. E. B. Ferguson 
and Miss Betsy Green served tea. 

Publicity Department Woman's Auxiliary 



LENTEN PLANS 



St. Peter's, Washington. The women of the Aux- 
iliary will meet each Monday afternoon during Lent 
to study the gospel of St. Matthew. 

St. George's, Lake Landing. During Lent the 
Auxiliary will study "The Book Nobody Knows" 
by Bruce Barton. 

St. Paul's Auxiliary, Greenville will observe the 
World Day of Prayer the First Friday in Lent, the 
second Friday there will be a corporate Communion. 
The Group will study Bishop Perry's book, "Christ 
the King". , ;! '"1 

St. Mary's Auxiliary, Greenville will meet each 
Thursday night to study "Christ the King" by 
Bishop Perry. 

Publicity Department Woman's Auxiliary 



BAPTISM OF THE DAUGHTER OF REV. AND 
MRS. E. C. McCONNELL 



What we believe was a very unique baptism was 
administered Sunday, February 9th, in the Church 
of the Good Shepherd, Wilmington. Carolyn Ann, 
three-month old daughter of the Rev. and Mrs. E. C. 
McConnell, was baptized by her father at the morn- 
ing service. A few years ago Deaconess Shaw, of 
the Philippines, returned home by way of the Holy 
Land and brought a bottle of water from the Jordan 
River which she gave to Miss Anna L. Roborfson, 
United Thank Offering, Parish Worker at th- Good 
Shepherd Church. This water was used for the ad- 
ministration of the baptism. The Sponsors for the 
child were Miss Robertson and the Rev. find Mrs. 
A. J. Mackie of Belhaven. Both the Rev. Mr. Mnc- 
kie and Mrs. Mackie are former missionar'os of the 
Church having been connected with the work of the 
Church in Guatanamo, Cuba. 



VOLUME L 



The Mission Herald 

WILMINGTON, N. C, FEBRUARY 1936 



NUMBER 2 



BISHOP'S LETTER 



Owing to the condition of the weather and to the 
further fact that very few of the clergy desire con- 
firmation appointments at this season of the year, 
I have little to report in the way of official acts 
since my December letter. 

I have been reasonably busy however, but as 
much of my time has been consumed in the routine 
of office work and in conferences, an account of it 
would not be of especial interest to our diocesan 
family. 

Since January first. I have preached in St. James' 
'Church, Wilmington, spent a week with friends in 
Florida, attended the splendid meeting of the 
Woman's Auxiliary, presided at a meeting of the 
Executive Council of the Diocese, preached in the 
Chapel of the Cross, Chapel Hill, and officiated at 
other services in and near Wilmington. 

On Wednesday, February the fifth, I ordained 
the Rev. James D. Beekwith to the priesthood in 
St. Paul's Church, Clinton. An appropriate and in- 
spiring sermon was preached by the Rev. Alexander 
Miller, rector of St. Paul's, Wilmington, and the 
candidate was presented by the Rev. Edgar W. Hal- 
leck, rector of St. John's, Wilmington. Other clergy 
present and taking part in the service were the Rev. 
W. R. Noe and the Rev. John Q. Beekwith of Hills- 
boro, N. C. The first official act of the newly or- 
dained priest was to present two persons for con- 
firmation. 

On Sunday the ninth, I celebrated Holy Commun- 
ion in the Church of the Good Shepherd, Raleigh, 
at 7:30 A. M. and preached at 11 :00 A. M. As this 
latter service was broadcast, I had the privilege of 
speaking to many of my people in East Carolina 
who had been kept from attending services in their 
own churches on account of illness or the weather, 
and I have appreciated the letters and cards that 
have come from many who "listened in" that day. 

On the night of Wednesday, the eleventh, I at- 
tended a hopeful and encouraging meeting of the 
congregation of St. Pavd's Church, Wilmington, and 
mode an address. 

My appointments for the remainder of the month 
are as follows: St. Gabriel's, Faison on Sunday, 
the sixteenth ; meeting of the Board of Managers 
of the Thompson Orphanage, Charlotte on Tuesday 
the eighteenth. Will make an address at the State 
Sunday School Convention in Winston-Salem on 
Wednesdav. the nineteenth. 



Will take part in a wedding in Edenton on Satur- 
day the twenty-second and on Sunday, the twenty- 
third, will preach and confirm in the Church of the 
Advent, Williamston and St. Martin's, Hamilton. 

Plans are being worked out for a Clergy Confer- 
ence on Monday and Tuesday, the twenty-fourth and 
twenty-fifth. Definite rfiforma'tion regarding the 
Conference will be sent to the clergy in a few days. 

May 1 urge oar people to make use of the For- 
ward Movement Manual during Lent? The theme 
for the season is "The Good News of Lent" and I 
heartily endorse and approve the words of the Pre- 
siding Bishop, who says "Let every one into whose 
hands this booklet comes, set apart ten minutes of 
each morning in Lent to the meditation of the day 
and to the prayers which follow. Ask God's bless- 
ing on your home and on your church and for His 
direction of your life." 

This Lenten Manual should prove wonderfully 
helpful and stimulating and I know that if we use 
it faithfully and prayerfully during the coming 
Lent, we will be strengthened in our spiritual lives 
and made more worthy of the name we bear. 

I urge upon the clergy the importance of securing 
these manuals for their people at once, so that they 
may be distributed not later than the Sunday before 
\sh Wednesday. The manuals may be secured r 
two cents a copy from the Forward Movement Com- 
mission, 223 West Seventh Street, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Please make your Lent a blessed spiritual experi- 
ence through study, prayer, self-denial and unselfish 
service. 

Faithfully and affectionately, 

Your friend and Bishop, 

THOMAS C. DARST 



BISHOP'S APPOINTMENTS FOR MARCH 



March 1 — Church of the Holy Cross, Aurora, 11 :00 
A. M. 
St. John's Church, Bonnerton, 3:00 P. M. 
St. Jude's Church, Aurora, 7:30 P. M. 
4— Grace Church, Charleston, 8:00 P. M. 
8_St. Paul's Church, Beaufort, 11 :00 A. M. 
St. Clement's Church, Beaufort, 3 :00 P.M. 
15-22 — Mission, Christ Church, Roanoke, Va. 
29— St. Paul's Church, Greenville, 11:00 A. M. 
St. Andrew's Church, Greenville, 7:30 
P. M. 
31— St. Paul's Church, Newport News, Va., 
8 :00 P. M. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



MOSS HILL CHURCH HAS PROUD RECORD 



Holy Innocents Had Its Origin Before The War 
Between States 



By Miss Junie Whitfield 



HOLY INNOCENTS' EPISCOPAL CHURCH 
MOSS HILL, 1870—1934 

Certificate of Consecration 

DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA— IN THE NAME 

OF GOD AMEN 

Whereas the Rector, Church Wardens and Vestry- 
men of the Parish of Holy Innocents', Lenoir County 
and state of North Carolina have, by instrument this 
day presented to me, appointed and devoted a house 
of public worship erected by them in said County of 
Lenoir to the worship and service of ALMIGHTY 
GOD the FATHER, the SON and the HOLY GHOST, 
according to the provisions of the Protestant Epis- 
copal Church in the United States of America, in its 
Ministry, Doctrines, Liturgy, Rites and Usages ; and 
by a congregation in Communion with said Church, 
and in union with the Convention of the Diocese of 
East Carolina ; 

Whereas the same Rector, Church Wardens, and 
Vestrymen, have by the same instrument requested 
me to take their said House of Worship under my 
spiritual jurisdiction as Bishop of the Diocese of 
East Carolina and that of my successors in office, 
and to consecrate it by the name of Holy Innocents' 
and there-by separate it from all unhallowed, world- 
ly, and common uses and solemnly dedicate it to the 
Holy purpose above mentioned 

Now know all men by these presents, that I, Alfred 
Augustus Watson, D. D., by the Grace of GOD, 
Bishop of the Diocese of East Carolina, acting under 
the protection of ALMIGHTY GOD, do on this 
twenty-eighth day of October being the twentieth 
Sunday after Trinity and the festival of St. Simon 
and St. Jude in the year of our Lord, ninetcen-hun- 
dred, take the above mentioned House of Worship, 
under my spiritual jurisdiction as Bishop aforesaid, 
and that of my successors in office; and in the 
presence, of divers of the clergy, and a public con- 
gregation proscribed by the Protestant Episcopal 
Church in the United States of America, do conse- 
crate the same by name of Holy Innocents' and do 
hereby pronounce and declare that the said Holy 
Innocents' Church is consecrated accordingly, and 
thereby separated henceforth from all unhallowed, 
worldly and common uses, and dedicated to the 
worship and service of ALMIGHTY GOD. the 
FATHER, the SON. and the HOLY GHOST, for 
reading and preaching His Holy Word, for cele- 



brating His Holy Sacraments, for offering to His 
glorious majesty the sacrifice of Prayer, Praise and 
Thanksgiving for blessing His people in His name 
and for the performance of all other Holy Offices, 
agreeably to the terms of the Covenant of Grace 
and Salvation in our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, 
and according to 'the provisions of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church in the United States in its Minis- 
try, Dotrines, Liturgy, Rites and Usages: 

In testimony, whereof, I have herewith affixed 
my seal and signature in Holy Innocents' Parish on 
the day and in the year above written and in the 
seventeenth year of my ministry and consecration. 
ALFRED AUGUSTUS WATSON 



This country church located in Trent township, 
fourteen miles from Kinston had its beginning on 
February 13, 1870, when the Rev. John Bryan Wil- 
liams conducted the first Episcopal Service ever 
held in the community. This service was held in 
old Shiloh Church then kindly offered for this pur- 
pose by the few remaining Universalists who sur- 
vived the War between the States. 

At this time there were only two Episcopalians 
in this section, Dr. H. W. Blount and Mrs. Nathan 
Bryan Whitfield. About the year 1866 these two 
organized a Sunday School in Shiloh Universalist 
Church in which Episopal Literature was used and 
in this building Church services were held for about 
fifteen years. 

In May 1870 this Church was purchased frum the 
Universalists by Dr. H. W. Blount, Maj. D. S. Davis 
and Dr. James M. Kornegay, the money being paid 
to George W. Jones and wife Martha and Mr. Chris- 
topher Davis. The architecture of this little 'Church 
seemed to have been perfect, until Federal troops, 
shot out the windows and damaged it to such an 
extent that it sold for only $480. Work was begun 
by the Episcopalians to restore the building, win- 
dows were replaced, the interior arranged more 
conveniently and an organ purchased. 

The naming of Holy Innocents' had a very inter- 
esting origin which came about when the late vener- 
able Bishop Thomas Atkinson was holding a service 
in the Church. Seeing so many babies in the con- 
gregation ''for the mothers, rather than miss the 
benediction they would receive from this man of 
God, came with their infants in their arms," the 
Bishop told them to place their babies on buggy 
robes at the foot of the chancel. In his inspirational 
message, the Bishop preached about the innocent 
babies that were put to death in King Herod's time, 
and looking down he extended his hands over these 
sleeping babies and said, "These little innocents too 
are holy in Cod's sight. 

Mrs. Whitfield, one of the charter members was sc 



FEBRUARY, 1936 



impressed with this expression that she exclaimed at 
the close of the service, "My dear Bishop, you have 
suggested to us a name for our Church, and since 
our hopes for a strong Church depend so much upon 
these innocent little children, I think Holy Innocents' 
the most appropriate name we could find. ' ' 

On July 17, 1870 the first adult class was baptised, 
being Mrs. Hansey Allen and Ann Allen. Prior to 
this and during the same year the children of Dr. 
and Mrs. Blount were baptised by Rev. W. B. Gor- 
don, rector. On February 19, 1871, Col. N. B. Whit- 
field was baptised, the same year, also were baptised, 
Mrs. Sarah A. Kornegay, Miss Mary C. Davis, Miss 
Nancy R. Davis, George Jones, Smithey Jones, La 
Fayette Worley, Wm. Arcatus Jones and Richard A. 
Jones. 

On March 31, 1871, the first class for confirmation 
was presented by Rev. Mr. Gordon to Bishop At- 
kinson, as follows: Heritage W. Blount, M. D., Mrs. 
Winfred B. Blount, Col. Nathan B. Whitfield, Miss 
Mary C. Davis, Miss Nancy R. Davis, Mrs. Hansey 
Alien, and Ann Allen. By the confirmation of the 
above class and with Maj. David S. Davis and Joseph 
Allen, who seem from records to have already been 
confirmed, the Episcopal Church was firmly planted 
in this community, and admitted into the Diocese 
in May 1871. 

Services were conducted in the building known as 
Shiloh, with only a few additions until 1881. In 
these few years the congregation had outgrown this 
building and arrangements were made to build a 
new structure. Under the direction of Rev. Israel 
Harding and the first vestry, Col. N. B. Whitfield, 
George W. Jones, Dr. H. W. Blount. Maj. D. S. Davis, 
and James M. Kornegay, the old building was torn 
down and the present building was started, with 
much of the lumber and the doors of the old building 
being used in the present building. 

In 1882 the Cornerstone was laid for the new and 
present Church, the stone being blessed by the Rev. 
Nathaniel Harding, Rector of St. Peter's Church, 
Washington, a brother of the Rector of this Church. 
While the building was being built benches were 
grouped together about the grounds, and Divine 
Services were enjoyed for more than a year. 

The erection of this Church was a great undertak- 
ing for those days, for the community was so im- 
poverished by the ravages of war that it was a great 
strain on the people to pay the minister's salary, but 
with earnest and personal efforts of Rev. Israel 
Harding, with the sacrifices and hard work on the 
part of the people, the building was ready for use 
the second winter. Too much can not be said of the 
loyalty and zeal of Rev. Mr. Harding for he not only 
encouraged the congregation in every way possible, 
but he labored with his own hands to complete the 
work, and a beautiful memorial window adorns the 



Chancel, to cast a soft light over the Church in the 
early morning, this window being a memorial to him 
as an appreciation of his faithfulness and Christian 
leadership. 

Holy Innocents' Church was consecrated Sunday 
morning, October 28, 1900 at 10:30 o'clock by Bishop 
Watson assisted by Rev. G. M. N. George, of New 
Bern, Rev. G. P. Summerville of Goldsboro, Rev. 
Thomas Bell of Wilson, and the Rector, Rev. John 
H. Griffith. The services were elaborate and full. 
At the door the Wardens and Vestrymen of the 
Church met the Bishop and the Clergy, the Bishop 
going before the Clergy and they being followed 
by the Vestrymen. The twenty-fourth Psalm was 
alternately repeated. .After reaching the Chancel 
and the Clergy arranging themselves, Col. N. B. 
Whitfield, Senior Warden, handed the instruments of 
donation to the Rector, who in turn presented them 
to the Bishop, who placed them upon the Altar. 
At this point Col. Whitfield read the request for 
consecration and the Bishop then dedicated the Edi- 
fice to the honor and glory of God's great name 
separating it from all unhallowed, ordinary and 
common use. A full Church service was held. The 
Church was beautifully decorated with white hang- 
ings, evergreens and flowers, while the music was 
the best ever heard at the Church. The congrega- 
tion completely taxed the capacity of the Church 
while many were unable to get in. 

The sermon was a masterly effort and one calcu- 
lated to deepen the regard and respect for a house 
set apart to the honor of God's name and worship. 

After holding several mission services in the 
Church, Rev. Robert Strange was so impressed with 
the faithfulness and earnestness of the people, he 
decided that a Parish School would be a great bene- 
fit, in instructing the young people of the community 
in the customs of the Church, so as soon as he was 
Consecrated Bishop, he used his influence to establish 
a Parish School. At a meeting of the Vestry, plans 
for a school were discussed, such school was to be 
named Holy Innocents' Parish School. Messrs. H. 
W. Davis, and L. P. Jones were appointed to serve 
as an advisory committee with the Vestry of the 
Parish in regard to the school. 

On Saturday, July 11. 1903, a large number of 
both old and young men of the community met on 
the hill near the Church to select the exact site and 
location for the Parish School and to clear the tim- 
bers and other things from the site. About $120 
and timber and work were promised this same day 
and Rev. J. H. Griffith, D. A. Whitfield, and Oscar 
Hardy were apuointcd to solicit funds for the erec- 
tion of the building and to take in charge all work 
pertaining' to same at the present time. 

Oopvincr from the Church records. "On Saturdav, 
August 8, 1903. the laying of the corner stone for 



6 



THE MISSION HERALD 



Holy Innocents' Parish School was celebrated at 
4:00 P. M. In spite of the exceeding warm weather 
a large crowd assembled in the shade of the beautiful 
trees that nature provided to shelter the pleasant 
and beautiful hill on which the said stone was laid, 
to witness the beautiful services, to listen to the ad- 
dresses that were delivered and to witness the deed 
that had been much talked of and much thought of 
for a few months preceding. 

"The addresses were commenced with a few words 
from the Superintendent of the Sunday School, Mr. 
Oscar Hardy, seconded by Ool. N. B. Whitfield, and 
last by Rev. F. H. T. Horsfield, Goldsboro, who very 
ably and eloquently placed before the minds of all 
those present the sacred work for which the building 
was to be erected. He very beautifully laid before 
us three stages of the life of man as were plainly 
pictured within a few hundred yards of the building. 
First, was the work of the physical man as was 
pictured by the mill that was running beneath the 
hill on which we stood. Second, the mental man that 
was to be trained within the sacred walls which we 
met to begin, and thirdly, that to be most considered, 
we found in glancing a little farther at the top of 
the hill was the Christian or religious man. That 
after he had started at the foot of the ladder so to 
speak and trained the physical man at the mill, and 
then a few steps higher where an opportunity would 
be given for the training of the mind, the mental 
man ; then to the dear old walls of the Church would 
come a mind more fitted and more able to compre- 
hend the precious gifts and promises to those who 
attained such a life ; as she extended a welcome hand 
to lead, and to guide us up. The services were con- 
cluded by the singing of the hymn, "The Church's 
One Foundation," and here might be added the 
foiirth stage, pictured by the Rector the following 
day, the graveyard which surrounded or came after 
the Church, to claim those who accepted as well as 
those refusing to accept the opportunities offered 
by the preceding three. On this Saturday all the 
foundation for the building was laid. The school 
was completed at the close of the year 1904, and the 
first officers were Col. N. B. Whitfield, president; 
H. W. Davis, vice-president ; Oscar Hardy, secretary 
and treasurer. 

The Sunday School at Holy Innocents' has been 
held continuous in unbroken succession since before 
1883 when the Sunday School services were discon- 
tinued for two years. Since the earliest history of 
the Church, the day following Christmas was ob- 
served as a holiday and that custom is observed 
today. For the last thirty-eight years, excepting 
two years that he was out of the community, out of 
the over half eenturv that the Sunday School has 
worked, Mr. Oscar Hardy has been superintendent 
of the School. Much of his time and efforts have 



been given to the church and its work, and through 
his fine work the Sunday School has been growing 
steadily. Present officers of the Church School are : 
Mr. Oscar Hardy, superintendent ; J. E. Newman, 
assistant superintendent; Lehman Barwick, secre- 
tary and treasiu*er; Oscar Hardy, D. A. Whitfield, 
J. G. Whitfield, J. E. Newman, L. P. Hardy and 
G. W. Jones, vestrymen. In 1928 Rev. A. C. D. Noe 
came to the Church here as rector and he has done 
a fine work. 

The Woman's Auxiliary has been working for a 
number of years. They have done special work in 
the Church locally and abroad. Miss Mayme Whit- 
field is the faithful president of the Auxiliary. The 
association cares for a number of people in remote 
sections of the United States, to remember them and 
help make their holidays brighter at the Christmas 
season with gifts. Numerous objectives and pro- 
jects are carried out in the community each year. 

The Young People's School Society at the begin- 
ning of 1900 was the first young people's organisa- 
tion of the Church here. This was followed by the 
Junior Society, next the Junior Auxiliary, and was 
one of the first groups of young people in the Diocese 
of East Carolina to organize a Young People's Sei*- 
vice League, or rather change the name of the young 
people's group, which holds the name today. The 
league works in co-operation with the Sunday School, 
and yearly objectives are carried out both locally 
and in the Diocese and in the world. Members of 
the League have attended Camp East Carolina, Fay- 
etteville; Camp Kanuga, Hendersonville ; and Camp 
Leach. Washington. Gerard Hardy is president of 
the League. With a membership of thirty the League 
stands out in the work of the Diocese, and is one of 
the five leading groups of East Carolina. 

A ceremonv of profound interest was solemnized 
in this Church Sunday, June 17, when one of her 
own sons, John Wm. Hardy, and the great-grandson 
of one of the founders of Holy Innocents' and its 
first Junior Warden, received Holy Orders for the 
Ministry in the Episcopal Church. He finished from 
the Theological Seminary, at Alexandria, Va., an I 
was a former student at William and Mary College, 
after graduating from the high school at Moss Hill. 

"Dear Holy Innocents', a hallowed shrine thou art 
Where many kindred souls delight to meet 

And in your sacred service take a part 

While gathered 'round one common mercy seat. 

To those of us who've known your sheltered m-pJ 
Your hallowed walls breathe peace and 1ot| 
divine ; 
May Heaven's benediction and a prayer, 
Rest eternally on Thee and Thine." 
;•' ' Reprint 






FEBRUARY, J 936 



WHAT YOUR OFFERING MEANS TO THE MIS- 
SIONARIES AND THEIR FAMILIES 



By Mrs. A. C. D. Noe 



zens in the greatest kingdom in the universe, and 
any contribution we make, either in funds or service, 
to any unit of the church, advances the whole pro- 
gress of the Kingdom. 



As the wife of a clergyman, who has spent practi- 
cally all his ministry in the home mission field, 1 
would like to tell those who have supported the 
diocesan program, and put something on both sides 
of the envelope, what their contributions mean to 
the missionaries and their families. 

The missions are dependent in part, and sometimes 
to a great extent, upon diocesan support. Most of 
the stations in the diocese of East Carolina are in 
rural or smal town areas where the income of the. 
people is from agricultural operations, and naturally 
their contributions come in the fall of the year, 
leaving the Rector practically without funds during 
the summer months. When crops are good and 
prices high, collections are fair, and the minister 
is able to meet his obligations, bitt during the lean 
years he finds himself greatly handicapped for lack 
of funds. The only prospect which he has of a sure 
monthly income is the stipend from the diocese, 
which comes from your contributions to the red 
side of the envelope. 

None but the recipient of this fund can understand 
how sorely it is needed at times, and how greatly 
it is appreciated, nor what a feeling of security it 
gives to know that this source of income has never 
failed, and as the widow's meal and cruse of oil, 
never will. 

The minister, like other men, has to deal Avith the 
butcher, the baker and the candlestick maker, month- 
ly at least, and his cost of operation, traveling ex- 
penses, and upkeep of car-, eats a big hole in his 
budget, often leaving insufficient funds for living 
expenses, thus handicapping him in his work and 
curtailing his efficiency. 

The contribution you make to this work is a valu- 
able aid to the general church, and often to your 
own parishes, as recruits from the rural church move 
to town and become supporters thei^e. 

During his years of ministry, the average rural 
clergyman sends more communicants to the city 
parishes than he retains at the home base — thus 
"Bread cast upon the water" comes back doubly 
blessed. 

While you are acting as channels through which 
the water of life flows to distant places, the stream 
winds on back to you. bringing our contribution of 
service, and bearing our prayers and thanks. 

We are fellow members of a great Church, the 
largest and most influential in the English-speaking 
world, with more than 35,000,000 . communicants. 
Its branches extend around the world, and the sun 
ne-\p" pets upon its activities. We are fellow citi- 



THOMPSON ORPHANAGE NOTES 



The Young People's Service League of St. Martin's 
Church, Charlotte, entertained most delightfully the 
High School and Junior High School children of the 
Orphanage at St. Martin's Parish Hall on Friday 
evening, January 16th. The occasion was thorough- 
ly enjoyed by the children and they greatly appre- 
ciated the kindness of Mr. Jackson and his young 
people in planning such a happy party for them. 

On Saturday, January 17th, the Coach and twenty 
boys from the Junior Order Home at Lexington 
came to the Orphanage and defeated our boys in two 
hotly contested games of Basket Ball. On January 
31st our two teams are expecting to journey to Lex- 
ington for return games and this trip our boys hope 
to win. 

The Superintendent had the pleasure and privilege 
of attending the Convention of the Woman's Aux- 
iliary of the Diocese of East Carolina which met in 
St. John's Church, Wilmington, January 22-23. The 
women of the Convention were most generous and 
voted a generous check to the Orphanage and Sec- 
tion C of the Auxiliary of St. James' Church also 
contributed a check, and three offers to clothe child- 
ren were tendered. It was a splendid Convention, 
presided over most capably by Mrs. F. W. Outland 
the President. 

In the Thompson Orphanage Auditorium on Fri- 
day afternoon, January 24th, the Junior League of 
Charlotte, presented a very clever little Play called 
"The Garden Circus". The parts were all admir- 
ably taken and the costumes and the stage setting 
were unusually good. In addition to the children 
from the Orphanage, the pupils from the Sunshine 
School, and the Alexander Home and a large num- 
ber from homes in town filled the auditorium to 
capacity. 

On Sunday, January 26th, the Superintendent had 
the pleasure of reporting' on the Orphanage to the 
congregation of Trinity Church, Asheville at the 
eleven o'clock service. 



Quotations from young people's letters made up 
most of the report presented by Miss Eva D. Corey 
for the National Council's committee on young peo- 
ple's work. Eighteen conclusions or recommenda- 
tions were added for further discussion. The com- 
mittee's report was only preliminary and tentative. 
It has been referred to the Religious Education De- 
partment from whom a copy may be had if desired. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



The Mission Herald 

ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 
Published Monthly except July and August at 

607 Southern Building 
WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF ~~ 

Editor 

REV. WALTER R. NOE 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 

RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 

MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 
Advertising rates furnished on application. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to receive 
their papers, should promptly notify the Business Man- 
ager, giving when necessary, both the old and new ad- 
dress. 



LENT 



Few sentences in the New Testament are more 
pathetic than this: "For there were many coming 
and going, and they had no leisure so much as to 
eat." Our Lord had sent His disciples out to do 
their work of healing and teaching. They had done 
it, and now they had come back to make their report 
to Him. Jesus listened with interest mingled with 
joy and pity. He knew that men need for their work 
not only enthusiasm but strength, He noted their 
tired faces. So when their tale Avas told He simply 
said, "'Come by yourselves apart into a desert place, 
and take a little rest." And in the words of simple 
pathos, the Evangelist adds, "For crowds were com- 
ing and going, and they had not even a chance to 
eat." So at the Master's bidding, they entered a 
boat and went away to a desert place apart from 
the pressure of the crowd. 

To ask the question, "Must I keep Lent?" is to 
mistake a gracious invitation for a fancied burden. 
The Church does not intend the forty days preceding 
Easter to be a dreary season of diminished joy. 
Riirhtly understood it is an opportunity to enjoy 
special privileges. Have we not been pushed and 
harried by the crowds coming and going in the cease- 
less round of business and social activities? The 
Church bids us "Come apart for awhile and rest." 
This does not mean that Ave are to suspend our daily 
responsibilities. Work must go on in the shop, in 
the school, in the home. Rest does not mean free- 
dom from activity. It does mean the renewal of 



our strength — the deepening of our spiritual capa- 
cities, i i 

Whatever we may "give up" during Lent ought 
to be prompted by one major motive — not that we 
may be seen of men, but that we may win for 'Our- 
selves some finer apprehension of Christ and His 
way of life. To come apart with Him, is to enter 
into the secret places where the soul claims fellow- 
ship with Cod and finds that strength which only 
He can give. 

— Lenten Folder, St. John's, Wilmington 



LET ME KEEP LENT 



By Elizabeth Badley Read 



Let me keep Lent, 

Let me not kneel and pray, 

Forego some trifle every day, 

Fast . . . and take Sacrament . . . 

And then 

Lend tomrue to slander, hold ancient grudge, deny 

The very Lord Whom I would glorify. 

Let me keep Lent, 

Let my heart grow in grace, 

Let Thy light shine till my illumined face 

Shall be a testament 

Read by all men 

That hate is buried. Self, crucified — new-born 

The spirit that shall rise on Easter morn. 

— Good Housekeeping 



CHURCH CALENDAR 



February — March 



February 23 — Quinquagesima Sunday (Violet, Red 

for Eve). 
February 2-1 — St. Matthias (Red). 
February 26 — Ash Wednesday (Violet). 
March 1 — First Sunday in Lent (Violet). 
March 4. 6. 7.— Ember Days (Violet). 
March 8 — Second Sunday in Lent (Violet). 
March 15— Third Sunday in Lent (Violet). 
March 22— Fourth Sunday in Lent (Violet). 
March 25 — Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary 

(White). 
March 29— Fifth (Passion) Sunday in Lent (Violet). 



MEETING OF ANNUAL CONVENTION 



The Annual Convention of the Diocese of East 
Carolina will meet in St. Paul's Parish, Edenton. 
May 13 and 14. 1936. 



FEBRUARY, 1936 



•J 



EAST CAROLINA'S PROGRAM 



We have recently received a copy of the program 
of prayer and action that is being followed this 
winter by the Woman's Auxiliary of the diocese of 
East Carolina, and we want to commend it heartily 
as one of the finest projects of the kind that has 
come to our attention. 

The East Carolina program is built around the 
general theme of the Auxiliary for the current tri- 
cnniurn : "If we be His disciples — what then?" This 
is of course also the keynote of the Forward Move- 
ment and Ihe program is accordingly built around 
the seven steps in discipleship as emphasized in 
Forward Movement literature, and particularly as 
interpreted in the series of meditations in the de- 
partment "Everyday Religion" in The Living 
Church last July and August. For each month one 
of these meditations is to be used, and activities and 
studies for the month are based upon it. During 
February, for example, the meditation is on the 
phrase, "A disciple serves," and emphasis is laid 
on preparation for the World Day of Prayer (Feb- 
ruary) 28th) and on Christian Social Service. 

Mrs. Fred Outland of Washington, N. C, the presi- 
dent of the Auxiliary in East Carolina, is also chair- 
man of the Women Associates of the Forward Move- 
ment. Under her leadership the women of the 
Church are givinjr the Forward Movement a new 
impetus, and making it more effective and far-reach- 
ing than ever before. 

— Editorial, Living Church. 



THE USE OF THE "FORWARD— DAY BY 
DAY" MANUAL 



The chairman of the women associates of the 
Forward Movement Commission has addressed an 
excellent letter to the members of the Executive 
Board of her province. It tells all of us what we 
can do to develop the Forward Movement in our 
parishes and dioceses and should be in the hands of 
all women who are leaders in the work of the Church. 
Mrs. Outland says in part: "I wonder if Ave fully 
realize the opportunities of the Forward Movement, 
and if we are availing ourselves of the privileges 
that can be ours through this splendid effort on the 
part of our Church If you have all had the ex- 
perience that has been mine through the daily use 
of the manuals Forward — Day by Day, then I am 
sure you feel as I do ; that we must do something 
about it." 

And what shall that something be? First of all, 
share it with others. Find someone who is not 
using the manual and give her a copy, telling her 



what it has meant to you. But do not be willing 
to stop there, for there are others that you can 
reach. Do not be satisfied until every family in 
your diocese is sharing in its benefits. 

From the first we have felt that a great responsi- 
bility rests on the women of the Church to create a 
consciousness of the Forward Movement; and next 
a demand for, and the regular use of the manuals. 
It has been true that opportunity carries with it a 
responsibility, so it is our duty and privilege now 
to share with others what we have gained, until we 
are all going forward with very certain steps. Mrs. 
Ober, a member of our national board, has expressed 
it impressively in these words: "Forward! In the 
very word there is movement. Perhaps a picture 
of swinging strides flashes before our eyes, yet only 
by small steps do we learn at last to stride." So 
let us learn to follow the seven steps, as outlined 
by the Forward Movement : Turn — Follow — Learn — 
Pray — Serve — Worship — Share. 

— Living Church 



JAMES BECKWITH ORDAINED 



Popular Young- Minister Elevated to the Priesthood 
In Episcopal Church By Bishop Darst 



Clinton. N. C. — Rev. James D. Beckwith, for the 
past several months deacon-in-charge of St. Paul's 
Episcopal Church here, was ordained in the Order 
of the Priesthood here this (Wednesday, February 5) 
morning in a service over which the Right Reverend 
Thomas C. Darst, Bishop of the Diocese of East 
Carolina, presided. 

Rev. Alexander Miller, rector of St. Paul's Church 
in Wilmington, preached the ordination sermon and 
Rev. E. W. Halleck, rector of St John's Church in 
Wilmington, presented the candidate to the Bishop 
for ordination. Rev. W. R. Noe, of Wilmington, 
Executive Secretary of the Diocese and a former 
rector of the local church, read the Litany for Ordi- 
nation. Rev. John Q. Beckwith, Jr., of Hillsboro, 
brother of the ordinand, read the Epistle. 

Special music for the service was furnished by 
the church choir, a feature of which was a solo by 
Miss Eleanor Graham. 

Two candidates were confirmed at the service. 
They were : Mrs. Algernon Butler and Miss Mary 
Langdon Morisey. They were presented by Rev. 
Jarnes D. Beckwith. 

Following the service the ladies of the Woman's 
Auxiliary of the church served a luncheon at the 
Community Center Building. 

— Sampson Independent 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD 



SERMON PREACHED IN ST. PAUL'S, CLINTON 

AT THE ORDINATION OF REV. JAMES D. 

BECKWITH, BY REV. ALEXANDER 

MILLER, RECTOR OF ST. PAUL'S, 

WILMINGTON 



I Timothy, Chapter 1, verses 11 and 12. Accord- 
ing to the glorious gospel of the blessed God, which 
was committed to my trust, and I thank Christ Jesus 
our Lord, who hath enabled me, for that he counted 
me faithful, putting me into the ministry. 

It is a privilege to have a part in this great service. 
The work, the prayers, the hopes, the aspirations of 
•the years find their climax in this ordination to the 
Priesthood. It has been a long road. All the way 
the eyes of the candidate have been focused upon 
this service. Always doing his best, giving his best, 
knowing that step by step the road would lead on- 
ward and upward to the Priesthood of the Church, 
the goal of his heart's desire. 

It is well for us to review these steps, to think of 
that which has been required of the candidate, and 
the part the people of the Church have had in this 
development. The first question to be asked the 
candidate in this service of ordination is this, "Do 
you think in your heart, that you are truly called, 
according to the will of our Lord Jesus Christ, and 
according to the Canons of this Church, to the Order 
and Ministry of Priesthood?" In substance this 
same question was asked before this candidate was 
made a Deacon. 

The Church puts this call, the importance of it, 
first. Cod calls men. It comes in different ways, 
at different times, to different men, but when it 
comes it is unmistakable and it is inescapable. It 
came to Moses at the burning bush, to the boy Sam- 
uel in the service of the Temple, to Matthew at the 
seat of custom, to fishermen as they mended their 
nets, to Saul on the Damascus Road. The call comes 
today as it did in the past. Perhaps it is in the 
quiet of an Early Oommunion Service, with just a 
few people present, as it did to one of the Church's 
great preachers, or during a session of the Church 
School as it did to one of our missionaries. Yes it 
comes in the Christian home, God speaks to the boy 
through the devotion, the service, the godliness of a 
father and mother. No matter how or when or 
under what circumstances, the Church recognizes 
the importance of it and asks the candidate to bear 
Avitness to it. 

The Church's way requires a Ions testing time, 
that enables a man to be sure before he answers this 
important question and accepts this great responsi- 



bility of having committed to his trust, the glorious 
gospel of the Blessed God. 

Now it should be noted that in every step of the 
wa}' the responsibility of a man's acceptance and 
his development is balanced between the Bishop, 
the Clergy, and the people of the Church. The peo- 
ple therefore, as well as the Bishop and Clergy have 
a very definite part in the joy and responsibility of 
this ordination. 

First a man is accepted as a Postulant. The can- 
didate talks the matter over with his minister. Ho 
tells him his experiences and desires. These are 
reported to the Bishop. If accepted, he becomes a 
Postulant, a beginner, one in whom is promise. 

Next is his acceptance as a Candidate for Holy 
Orders. This comes with the completion of his aca- 
demic training. He must be a graduate of a recog- 
nized College or University or have the equivalent 
in training and this equivalent must be established 
by examinations before his Diocesan Chaplains. His 
application, which bears Avitness to his fitness, must 
be signed by a clergyman and the representatives 
of a congregation — the members of a Vestry at a 
regular Vestry meeting. All this evidence must be 
presented to the Standing Committee of the Diocese 
for their consideration and approval, before the 
Bishop accepts and declares he has been admitted 
a Candidate for Holy Orders, and before he begins 
his theological training in a Seminary of 'the Church. 

Following this theological training, upon gradu- 
ation from the seminary, he must present himself 
for examination before the Examining Chaplains of 
his Diocese. The report of the Chaplains, 'together 
with other evidences of his fitness — mentally, spir- 
itually, physically, witnessed to by Clergy and peo- 
ple, are presented to the Bishop, and by him are sub- 
mitted to the Standing Committee of the Diocese 
for their consideration and approval — before he is 
made a Deacon. 

After a period of service in the Diaconate, this 
process with its examinations, declarations and wit- 
nessing is required before the Deacon is presented 
for ordination to the Order of the Priesthood. 

This is the barest outline of the preparation and 
work that has brought us to this moment. 

This moment that witnesses not only to the joy 
of accomplishment but to a great sense of responsi- 
bility. No man can answer the questions asked 
him in this service without feeling this sense of 
resnonsibilitv. and his own unworthiness. No man 
comes to this moment without thanksgiving in his 
heart to his Lord who hath enabled him. for that 
H" counted him faithful, THltHng him into this min- 
stry. And no peonle should witness this service 
without this sense of responsibilitv and thanksgiving. 
The success of this ministry depends upon the recog- 



FEBRUARY, .1036 



11 



nizing and the sharing of this responsibility and the 
showing forth of our thankfulness. We are going 
to make full use of this life, filled with the spirit of 
the living God, with a great love in his heart, and 
the desire to spend and to lose his life in the service 
of his Lord, or we are going to abuse it and dissipate 
it. The people share in the making of a minister 
and they are in a large measure responsible for the 
success of his ministry. This is the time and this is 
the occasion to face these facts. 

It is customary — the usual procedure at such a 
time as this — to direct our thoughts to the candidate. 
All the light is focused upon the man as he stands 
in the presence of his Lord and His representatives 
and yields his life, his all to the service of Christ. 
In the light of things as they are today in the Church 
it is well that we reverse this order. 

I have no fear, there is no question in my heart, 
regarding this man's devotion to Christ and His 
Church. It was born in him. I know his father 
and his mother. I have had personal contact with 
him all along the way, from the day he was accepted 
a Postulant to his examinations for the Priesthood, 
yes to this very moment. I know what is in his 
heart and mind this morning. His one prayer is 
expressed in the hymn used this morning — "Lord 
iise me, just as Thou wilt and when and where". 
Your knowledge of him sustains this estimate of his 
life. 

Let us therefore consider together what we must 
do to make his life fruitful. In the Office of In- 
struction in our Prayer Book, we have stated the 
duty of a membor of the Church. Let us consider 
this bounden duty as it relates itself to the work 
of the ministry in general and the ministry of this 
man in particular. 

We read in this instruction," My bounden duty 
(as a member of Christ's Church) is to follow Christ, 
to worship Cod every Sunday in His Church, and 
to work and pray and give for the spread of His 
kingdom " 

As Christians we march under one banner, Christ's 
banner, the glorious banner of the victorions cross. 
We take not the world's way, but Christ's. The 
minister is set apart in this service as a leader, he 
is an officer in Christ's army. He leads, but he 
must have the people with him if the army advances, 
and if there be accomplishment of the task com- 
mitted to it. 

Our first requirement and responsibility in fol- 
lowing Christ is "To worship God every Sunday in 
His Church." I heard a Roman Priest, during a 
Mission, say the first question Saint Peter asks a 
member of the Roman Catholic Church is this — 
"Were you a Mass Misser?." This seemed at the 
time a rather unusual suTiem?nt to me — I was a 



young man — today I know what he meant. People 
talk of their love for Christ and His Church, but 
they do not show it. They do not fulfill the first 
requirement. They neglect His worship. This fail- 
ure of our people to attend the services of worship 
breaks the heart and the spirit of the minister, more 
than we realize. Worship is giving to God the honor 
and glory due a loving Father. It expresses itself 
in praise, thanksgiving, prayer, and the willingness 
to receive instruction. A member of the Church 
cannot, be what he ought to be without worship, 
without partaking of the life of God in the Sacra- 
ment of the Altar. 

A minister called to see the members of a family 
to urge them to attend the services of worship. They 
had been very careless and indifferent. During his 
talk he took the tongs and lifted from the bed of 
coals in the grate one piece of burning coal and 
placed it on the brick of the fireplace. He con- 
tinued his talk and then one asked him why he did 
this thing. He said, "Look at the coal I placed 
there — when I picked it from the bed of coals it was 
burning, ablaze, but see it now, it has lost its light, 
fire, warmth, it has turned black." This demon- 
stration was enough, the members of the family 
understood. The excuses our people make for their 
neglect of worship do not excuse. They are not 
worthy of us. We try to justify ourselves. We 
blame the music and the preaching, but we make 
the music and we make the preaching. I am quite 
sure every clergyman in this chancel has at one 
time or another read or studied in course Doctor 
r.roadus' book on preaching, in one of the foot notes 
you read this warning — "The man who preaches to 
pews as though they were men will in a short time 
be preaching to men as though they were pews." 
Unless guarded against with all diligence this is the 
situation our people by their neglect create. The 
worship of the Church is our witness for Christ. 
The witness of the minister is not enough — it is 
not complete without your presence and your con- 
tribution. 

The second requirement is to work for the spread 
of Christ's Kingdom. Every man has his work to 
do, his contribution to make. He makes it or God's 
work suffers. One sure way to deaden, yes kill 
the spirit and effectiveness of a minister is to make 
him think his task is ministering to you. This con- 
gregation is not this man's field. His field is the 
world and every member of the Church is his helper, 
and to this end every member is either an asset or 
a liability. I have people in my parish I must go to 
see regularly if I get them out to worship. It seems 
to me at times they just return my call and then 
forget about it. This is no expression of member- 
ship at all. There is too much of this desire to be 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD 



ministered unto, rather than to minister, in the 
Church today. The success of this ministry depends 
upon your work and your cooperation. 

With work is linked prayer. There would be 
less criticism, more work, better results, if we had 
more prayer. Do we pray for the spread of Christ's 
Kingdom? It hurts when you hear men say the 
requirements of the Brotherhood of St. Andrew are 
too high, and one requirement is "to pray daily for 
the spread of Christ's Kingdom — " Take out the 
petitions we offer in prayer for ourselves and for 
our 0\vn and what is left of our prayers. I startled 
my people one Sunday morning by asking the ques- 
tion, "How many of you prayed for me this past 
week? How many asked God to bless and use me?" 
I wonder how many on Sunday pray for God's 
blessing on what is said and done that some soul 
be helped, some one brought to Christ. My friends 
it means so much. A minister was having trouble 
in his parish, one vestryman was pulling with all 
his might against the minister. The minister called 
to see him and asked him "Do you, or have you ever 
prayed for me?" The man admitted he had not 
and did not. They knelt in prayer — prayed for 
one another, now they are working together. Pray- 
er changes things. We begin this day praying for 
this man. let ns keep it up. Pray every day for 
your minister, your Bishop and the Clergy of the 
Church, we need it. Pray for the spread of Christ's 
Kingdom. 

To worship, work and prayer is added giving. We 
not only give of ourselves but of our substance. 
Your giving- -your money is essential to the success 
of this ministry and the spread of Christ's Kingdom. 
A man in the ministry may elect to follow the rule 
of poverty, but it is wrong for any people to subject 
him to it. When a boy I heard this story of a cer- 
tain minister, when he did not have money on Sat- 
urday night he borrowed a ten dollar bill from his 
Senior Warden, he said he could preach better with 
it in his pocket. Whether we like it or not, as the 
Church is constituted today, with all that we require 
of our ministers, it is asking much of any man to 
live and preach a hopeful gospel, when we keep him, 
yes bury him in the hopelessness of financial con- 
cern and burden. 

T am not stating what I think this morning. I am 
declaring what the Church requires of every member 
of the Church. The responsibility of the whole 
Church does not end with the making of a minister. 
This man is dedicating his life to Jesus Christ, and 
His Church. As we are responsible in part for his 
standing here today, we are responsible for the 
success of his ministry by doing what is required of 
us and what we promised to do. 

T know my dear brother this is a moment of great 



joy in your life. It has been said so many times in 
so many ways, this world does not lack an ideal, it 
needs men and women with courage, Willing to 
struggle up to the ideal. It does not lack standards, 
as one writer tells us, it stands in need of standard 
bearers. I know you want to give your all — that is 
why you are here this morning. 

I know and every one of your brothers in the 
ministry know something of what you must ex- 
perience, if you hold fast and make your contribu- 
tion to Christ and His Church. 

You have heard God's call and answered it. You 
feel this responsibility — you are thankful for having 
a part in this ministry. This thing is sure, and we 
your brothers in the ministry bear witness to it, He 
who called you will never leave you nor forsake you. 
There are days when you will feel the pull of the 
rope and realize the way is not always smooth. 1 
is good for you — you reach out and He is there. He 
is with you. Always reach out, you will never be 
disappointed. No effort made for God falls to the 
ground. There are times when this must be kept in 
mind. The Kingdom of God for which we work 
and pray and give will come — never doubt it, never 
grow weary, it is Cod's Kiiurdom, and it will come 
in God's time, your task and mine is to make our 
contribution. I know you are going to try. 

I earnestly pray for God's richest blessing upon 
you and your ministry. What a glorious thing it 
is to be entrusted with this gospel, how thankful 
we are for your part, and our part in this ministry. 
We follow Christ, we work and pray and give. 
Bishops. Clergy and the congregations committed to 
our charge, looking forward to the great day when 
we. the redeemed, shall gather round the great 
throne of God and join in the Coronation Service 
and crown Him our Redeemer, Lord of Lords and 
King of Kings. If I understand it, this is the mean- 
ing and the purpose, the beginning and the end of 
this great Service today. 



WORLD DAY OF PRAYER TO BE OBSERVED 



The approaching World Day of Prayer, observed 
annually on the First Fi-iday in Lent, falls this year 
on February 28. 

Knowing that the spiritual vitality and power of 
all Christian movements find their source in prayer, 
it is encouraging to know that Christians abound the 
world will unite on that day in prayer and in wait- 
ing in the silence in His presence for direction in 
cooperating with Him in His plans. 

Early preparation insures arrangements comnleted 
well in advance of the day. Material for its observ- 
ance may be obtained from The Book Store. 281 
Fourth Avenue. New York. N. Y. 



FEBRUARY, 1936 



L3 



RURAL WORK CONFERENCE ON 
CONFIRMATION 



By Rev. J. Leon Malone 



Due to considerable interest and the importance 
of the Rural Work of the Church in the Diocese the 
Department of Missions and Church Extension ap- 
pointed a Rural Work Committee 'last fall; thisi 
committee to make a study of this subject and re- 
port to the Department before the 1936 Diocesan 
Convention convenes. The committee has made its 
report, and has been continued by the Department 
of Missions and Church Extension. Its members 
are the Rev. William Latta, Windsor, the Rev. John 
W. Hardy. Columbia, the Rev. James D. Beckwith. 
Clinton, Mr. Oscar Hardy, Seven Springs, and the 
writer. 

One of the committee's recommendatons was that 
a survey be made to locate the unattached Episco- 
palians in the Diocese. Much of this work has 
been done and there are over ninety names on the 
list to date. Many of these people have lived in 
communities withoiit the Church for many years 
and have continued faithful to it all this time. Some 
kind of program will be worked out whereby these 
people can have at least some of the ministrations 
of the Church and can have part in its life. 

Another recommendation of the committee is that 
conferences of the rural clergy and representatives 
from all their parishes and missions be held each 
fifth Sunday. We believe the fellowship and in- 
spiration of these gatherings will aid tremendousl.v 
in increasing the vitality and efficiency of the rural 
work in the diocese. We have decided that the sub- 
ject of the first meeting should be Confirmation. 
Others such as Religious Education in the small 
Church, Christian Social Service, Community Sur- 
veys, Keeping Church Records, Duties of the Vestry, 
etc., may be discussed very profitably. 

First Conference 

The first of these meetings will be held on tho 
fifth Sunday in March in Holy Innocents' Church, 
Seven Springs. The program will be as follows: 

1. Morning Prayer and sermon, by Rev. James D, 
Beckwith, 11 :00 A. M.. (Clergy vested) 

2. Lunch, served by the entertaining congrega- 
tion. , , 

3. Afternoon session, 2 :00 P. M., as follows : 

a. Recruiting candidates for Confirmation. 
Leader to be announced later. 

b. Training 1 Candidates for Confirmation. 

Leader to be announced later. 

c. " A f t er Confirmation, What ? ' ' 

! Rev. John W. Hardy, Leader. 



Fifteen minutes will be given to each phase of this 
subject. The leader will make an address and give 
opportunity for questions. 

After these discussions the entire group will be 
divided into three Findings Committees and their 
conclusions will be made available in written form 
for all interested persons. Thus the views and ex- 
periences of the entire group, as well as that of the 
leader, can be conserved for our use. 

All the Clergy and Wardens in the Diocese, and 
especially the Missionary Clergy and the Wardens 
from their Parishes and Missions and all interested 
persons are invited and urged to attend. Since the 
Wardens are the right hand men of the Rectors it is 
especially fitting that they attend this conference 
on Confirmation. Other leaders in the congrega- 
tions will be expected to attend other conferences. 



PROVINCE ISSUES NEW BULLETIN GIVING 
INFORMATION ABOUT TRAINING SCHOOLS 



The Department of Religious Education of the 
Province of Sewanee has just published a new Bul- 
letin on Leadership Training Schools, prepared by 
Miss Annie Morton Stout, member of the Educational 
Staff. This bulletin gives complete directions con- 
cerning the management of Leadership Training 
Schools, including Schools of Religion, Schools of 
Methods, and Church Normal Schools. It will be 
indispensable for all educational leaders that may 
be responsible for the management of Leadership 
Training- Schools of every kind, Educational Insti- 
tutes or other educational gatherings. The pamph- 
let furnishes detailed directions under the following 
heads : 

1. Type of School. 2. Courses of Study. 3. Pub- 
licity. 4. Preparation. 5. Bookstore. 6. Instruct- 
ors. 7. Finances. 8. Responsibility. 9. Rules. 

The pi'ice of the pamphlet is 5c. Copies may be 
secured from Rev. Gf. L. Tucker, Houma, Louisiana 
or Miss Annie Morton Stout, 205 South Idlewild, 
Memphis, Tennessee. 

GARDNER L. TUCKER, 

Executive Secretary 



The Episcopal Church's work among Negroes is 
a matter of increasingly urgent concern to every- 
body, Northerner or Southerner, who cares for the 
fulfillment of the Church's mission and the welfare 
of the Negro. In conference with southern bishops 
whose dioceses include a population of over seven 
million Negroes, a Council committee has been study- 
ing the Church's work. Their report was referred 
to the Domestic Missions Department and the whole 
subject is to come up again in February. 



n 



THE MISSION HERALD 



NAG'S HEAD 

Our Nag's Head Church building was erected 
after years of religious services had been held at 
Mrs. Duncan Winston's and some other cottages, 
and when the need of such a special building had 
been felt and the propriety of having it had been 
generally conceded. Clergymen interested and ac- 
tive were the Rev. Messrs. George F. Hill and Robert 
B. Drane. They were well supported by a unani- 
mous Laity. There was no formal organization, but, 
with one mind and good will, many of the Brethren 
who were listed in various Parishes joined in pro- 
viding a Place of Worship. The Minister in charge 
was appointed by the Bishop of East Carolina. 

The question as to where the Church should be 
built was earnestly considered. As usual it was a 
case of "Many men of many minds"— and some 
women ; and no snap judgment was taken. It was 
decided that, in justice to all, the Church should 
lie mid-way between Sea and Sound. A good 
lot on the Lowe Hotel property was freely given 
and on it our Church was built, and all went well. 
]n the course of time the ravages of wind and rain 
changed the face of our property from the high and 
dry site on which we had built to an almost inac- 
cessible water-soaked depression, the habitat of mos- 
quitoes and such like pests, which too often fought, 
to repel all comers or to devour them. 

By this time, the Ocean side had become the more 
built up and thickly occupied by Cottagers and the 
choice of a site in that region was evidently advis- 
able. 

When Parson Drane landed there, last summer, 
he was met by a chorus of congratulations on the 
prospect of the removal of our Church to a better 
place. Every one seemed sure of it. so due notice 
was given for a Public Meeting of friends of the 
Church, and at that meeting, after free and full 
discussion, in which there was not apparent any 
difference of opinion, it was unanimously voted that 
the Church building ought to be removed to a bet- 
ter place and a Committee was elected to carry out 
that resolution. Messrs. Stick and Bell, Designers 
and Builders of the notable Roanoke Colonists Me- 
morial Chapel at Fort Raleigh have rendered sym- 
pathetic service. 

The Trustees of the Diocese, Bishop Darst being 
Chairman, had approved the movement. Nothing 
hindered but the lack of money: in the presence of 
such harmony and enthusiasm, it was no time nor 
place for balking. 

The Committee has met cordial treatment from 
the Cox Realty Co. of Nag's Head. A vacant lot 
on the Ocean side, owned by our Church, was ex- 
changed for four lots, more desirable, owned by the 



Cox Realty Co. and transfer of the titles has been 
made. 

We have not bargained for the work, but have 
learned that it will cost several hundred dollars. 

We ask for contributions from friends of the 
Church. Send to any of the following Committee- 
men : Rev. Robert B. Drane, chairman, Monroe, N. C. ; 
(Nag's Head, in August) Rev. Frederick B. Drane, 
Monroe, N. C. ; Rev. George F. Hill, Elizabeth City, 
N. C. 



IN MEMORIAM 



MRS. ELLA GREEN 



Entered into rest on January 25, 1936, the soul 
of Mrs. Ella Green, a most faithful servant of the 
Master, a regular attendant upon the services of this 
Church and its parish organizations throughout a 
long and useful life. 

The Auxiliary will miss her wise counsel and ad- 
vice, her words of encouragement. The Auxiliary, 
hereby, expresses its love and sympathy to her loved 
time and means to the various activities sponsored 
by the Auxiliary and the Church, and 

Whereas, as an unselfish hostess she made a home 
for the Rector of the Parish and visiting Clergy- 
men, and 

Whereas, her character expressed love and char- 
ity, especially for those in need. 

Therefore, be it resolved, that the Woman's Aux- 
iliary of St. Paul's Church, Clinton, express its deep 
gratitude for the life of Mrs. Butler, its deep sense 
of love by her removal from our midst, love and 
sympathy for her family and all who are bereft by 
her going. 

Be it Further Resolved, That a copy of these reso- 
ones and directs that a copy be sent to the family, 
one to The Mission Herald and that another be in- 
corporated in the minutes of the Auxiliary. 

MRS. F. C, HARDING 



RESOLUTIONS 



The following resolutions were adopted by the 
Woman's Auxiliary of St. Paul's Church, Clinton 
at its meeting January 20, 1936. 

The Woman's Auxiliary of St. Paul's Church hav- 
m<? learned of the entrance of Mrs Eva Lee Butler 
into life eternal offer the following resolutions: 

Whereas. Mrs Eva Lee Butler was a former mem- 
ber of the Woman's Auxiliary and all her life a 
loval member of St. Paul's Church, and 

Whereas, she contributed in a useful way of her 



FEBRUARY, 1936 



15 



lutions be sent to the family of Mrs. Butler, to the 
Newspaper of the town of Clinton, to The Mission 
Herald, and that they be included in the minutes 
of this meeting. 

MRS. H. I. MORRIS 
MRS. W. H. HERRING 
MRS. WALLACE A. SMITH 



JAMES HICKS BUNTING 



At the regular meeting of the vestry of St. John's 
Church, Wilmington, N. C, February 3rd, 1936, the 
following resolution was unanimously adopted: 

Whereas. Our Father in Heaven did call the soul 
of James Hicks Bunting to the rest and peace of 
Paradise on Sunday the second day of February, A. 
D. 1936. 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED : 

That we the Rector and the Vestry of St. John's 



Church, Wilmington, North Carolina, do hereby ex- 
press our profound regret and sorrow in the loss of 
our friend and brother who for a long period of years 
has been a faithful member of this body. 

We record this as representatives of our entire con- 
gregation, being mindful of his generosity and char- 
ity, his candor and wise counsel, and his unfailing de- 
votion to the well being, work and services of the 
Church. 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED : 
That a copy of this resolution be spread upon the 
minutes of this meeting, that it be printed in our Dio- 
cesan paper, and that a copy be sent to the bereaved 
family. 

VESTRY OF ST. JOHN'S CHURCH, 
E. W. HALLECK, Rector 
T. F. DARDEN, Junior Warden 
MONTROSE M. HINNANT, Secretary 
TROY B. ANDERSON, 

Resolution Committee. 



«TITEME\T OF THF. AMOUM'S PAID HY THE PARISHES AND MISSIONS FOB DIOCESAN AND GENERAL, 

CHURCH WORK, JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER SI, 1930. 



Parishes 

Atkinson, St. Thomas' 

Beaufort, St. Paul's 

Clinton, St. Paul's 

Fayetteville, St. John's 

Golclsboro, St. Stephen's 

Hope Mil'is, Christ Church 

Kinston, St. Mary's 

New Bern, Christ Church 

Red Springs, St. Stephen's 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' 

Southport, St. Philip's 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd... 

Wilmington. St. James" 

W'i'mington. St. John's 

Wilmington, St. Paul's 

Organized Missions 

Burgaw, St. Mary's 

Faison, St. Gabriel's 



Aurora, Holy Cross 

Ayden, St. James' 

Bath, St. Thomas' 

Belhaven, St James' 

Bonnerton, St. John's 

Choeowinity, Trinity 

Columbia, St. Andrew's 

Creswell, St. Dstvid's 

Eden ton, St. Paul's 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church. 

Farmville, Emmanuel 

Gatesville, St. Mary's 

Greeny Te, St. Paul's 

Grifton, St. John's 

Hand' ton, St. Martin's 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 

Jessams, Zion 

Lake Landing, St. George's... 

Plymouth, Grace Church 

Roper, St. Luke's 

Washington, St. Peter's 

Williamston, Advent 



CONVOCATION OF WILMINGTON 



Expec- 
tations 

10. on 

316.15 

110.00 

1,600.00 

860.40 

60.00 

1,000.00 

1,624.20 

75.00 

200.00 

160.60 

375.00 

8,280.00 

1,800.00 

1,200.00 



35.00 
23.00 



Paid to 
Feb. 17-30 



131.50 
45.70 



122.36 

8.15 

144.31 

3.36 



Lumberton, Trinity 

North West, All Soul's 

Pikeville, St. George's 

Trenton, Grace Church 

Vanceboro, St. Paul's 

Whiteville. Grace Church.. 
Wr : ghtsville, St. Andrew's. 



Unorganized Missions 

Jasper, St. Thomas' 

Pollocksville, Mission 

Wilmington, Delgado Mission. 



Paroehial 

Campbellton, St 



Missions 

Philip's . . 
Folar-Hart, Good Shepherd 



Total. 



CONVOCATION OF EDFNTON 



250.00 
300 00 
35.00 
250.00 
100.00 
100.00 
200.00 
250.00 

1.488.98 

1,008.76 
238.20 
100.00 

1,356.20 
200.00 
75.00 
317.20 
100.00 
200.00 
150.00 
65.00 

1,500.00 
100.00 



64.14 
25.00 



77.59 



125.00 
25.00 



W'ndsor, St. Thomas' 

Winton, St. John's 

Woodville, Grace Church. 



Organized Missions 

Ahoskie, St. Thomas' 

Fairfield. All Saints' 

Murfreesboro, St. Barnabas'. 

Roxobel, St. Mark's 

Sladesville, St. John's 

Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' 

Sun-bury, St. Peter's 

Swan Quarter, Calvary 

Winterville, St. Luke's 

Yeatesville, St. Matthew's'. . . 



Unorganized Missions 

Avoca, Holy Innocents' 

Camden, St. Joseph's 



Total. 



CONVOCATION OF COLORED CHURCH WORKERS 



Parishes 

Fayetteville, St. Joseph's. 
New Bern, St. Cyprian's... 
Wilmington, St. Mark's... 



Organized Missions 

rtBihnven, St Mary's 

Edenton, St. John-Evangelist. 
Elizabeth City, St Philip's . . . 

HoM'-iboro. St. Andrew's 

K"inston, St. Augustine's 

Washington, St. Paul's.. ;':". . 



243.60 
362. 0u 
140.00 



100.00 

110.00 

23 00 

65.00 

80.00 

120.00 



Unorganized Missions 

Aurora, St. Jude's 

Beaufort, St. Clement's 

Greenville, St. Andrew's 

Haddock's Cross Roads, St. Steph 

Roper, St. Ann's 

Wilmington, "Brooklyn" Missioi 
Wrightsville, St. Augustine's... 



Total . 



Grand Total. 



Expec- 


Paid to 


tations 


Feb. 17-30 


3 75 00 


14.00 


10.00 




20.00 




15.00 




30.00 




100.00 




25.00 




20.00 




20.00 




15.00 




10.00 




75.00 


7.32 






18,253.35 


% 476.69 


225.00 


16.80 


80.00 




150.00 


2.10 


50.00 




10.00 




30.00 




92.00 


30.00 


10.00 




100.00 




46.35 




20.00 




125.00 


20.00 


20.00 




50.00 




10.00 




$ 9,402.69 $ 


335.63 


36.00 




40.00 




30.00 


5.00 


35.00 




25.00 




IS. 00 




18.00 




$ 1,445.60 


$ 5.00 


$29,101.04 


$ 867.32 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD 



* . 



VIRGINIA EPISCOPAL 
SCHOOL 

LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 



i I 



j Prepares boys for College and University. Splen- J 

did environment and excellent corps of teachers. | 

I High standard in scholarship and athletics. Healthy j 

S and beautiful location in the mountains of Virginia. ! 

Charges exceptionally low. For catalog apply to: j 

j REV. OSCAR deWOLF RANDOLPH I 

I i 

I 

•jt iin mi— mi — 



RECTOR 



ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Conducted for Negro Youth under the auspices of the Epis- 
copal Church. 

A four year accredited College Course is offered, leading to 
degrees of B. A. and B. S., including Pre-Medical work and 
Teacher Training for State High School Teachers' certificates. 

A College Preparatory Department, Training School for Nurses 
and School for Religious and Social Workers are connected with 
the College. 

Thorough training, healthy environment. Christian influences. 
For Catalog and information write — 

The Registrar 
ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE, RALEIGH, N. C. 









McCONNELL & CAUSEY 

FOR SERVICE 

Good-Year Tires Exide Batteries 

Quaker State Lubrication 

Telephone 88 12th & Market Sts. 

Wilmington, N. C. 



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COMMUNION BREAD 

IN SHEETS OR WAFERS. MONTHLY 
SUPPLIES ARE BEST. Address Mrs. T. T. 
Walsh, Walterboro, South Carolina. 



Form of Bequest 



„- t 



I hereby, give, devise, and bequeath to 
the Trustees of the Protestant Episcopal 



Church in the Diocese of East Carolina. 



I 



to be held by them in trust for. 



PREVENT C0LD3 



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Flurene 



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Made in East Carolina, — Used Everywhere 



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50c PER POUND 

WRITE US FOR SPECIAL CLUB 
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TOLAR, HART & HOLT MILLS 

FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 

4. __., . , „_„„ , .. 4 



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815 Murchison Building 



WILMINGTON, N. C. 



I I 

i I 
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I l 



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! SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 
JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

1 

An Episcopal School for girls — Have your daughter 
receive her education in a church school. 

Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, B. S., 
Principal 

Saint Mary's offers 4 years' High School and 2 
years' College work all fully accredited by the South- 
ern Association. Also courses in Music, Art, Ex- 
pression, Home Economics, and Business. 

20-Acre Campus. Gym and Field Sports. Tennis. 
Indoor Tiled Swimming Pool. Horseback 
Riding, Golf 

A. W. TUCKER, Business Manager. 



<•_._._.. — 



5p^3,oV 



Jan. 37 u, 18 S* 

Library, U. H. C. 
Chapel Hill, H. C. 







THE MISSION HERALD 



THOMPSON ORPHANAGE NOTES 



Annual Meeting of the Board of Managers 



The 49th annual meeting of the Board of Managers 
of the Thompson Orphanage, was held at the Orphan- 
age. Tuesday, February 18th at 10 A. M. 
The following members were present : 
From the Diocese of North Carolina — Rt. Rev. Ed- 
win A. Peniek, D. D. ; Rev. R. B. Owens, Rev. Milton 

A. Barber. S. T. D. ; Francis 0. Clarkson, Francis J. 
Murdoch and Mrs. Ashby Bee Baker. 

From the Diocese of East Carolina — Rt. Rev. Tlios. 
C. Darst, D. D. 

From the Diocese of Western North Carolina — Rev. 
Samuel B.j Stroup. and Mr. William L. Balthis. 

In addition there were present from the Executive 
Committee — Rev. John L. Jackson, Rev. Willis 0. 
Clark, Dr. Myers Hunter, Hamilton C. Jones, William 
H. Wil'iamson. Jr., Mrs., Sam Maxwell and Mrs. 
Owen Fitzsimmons. 

Several visitors also attended the meeting, includ- 
ing Mrs. F. J. Murdoch of Salisbury, Mr. and Mrs. 
Shanks of Hickory and Rev. Henry Johnston of Char- 
lotte. 

Reports were made by the various officers of the 
Institution and by the chairmen of the several com- 
mittees. A budget for 1936 of $24,470.00 was adopt- 
ed for the first six months of the year. 

The report of the Superintendent showed 119 chil- 
dren cared for during the year for a total of 38,6 .)4 
days care. Twelve children were placed, 2 at college, 
1 at a preparatory school, 2 in C. C. O camps, 1 in a 
nurses training school, 1 in a beauty parlor shop, and 
, r ) with relatives. Twelve children were admitted. 
Ten were confirmed and P baptized in the past year. 

The attention of the members of the Board was 
called to the fact that the Orphanage would be 50 
years old next year and the suggeston was made that 
a commdtee from the three dioceses be appointed to 
plan for a fitting commemoration of the Golden Jubi- 
lee of the Orphanage. This suggestion was approved 
and the members of the committee are being selected. 

The Rev. Milton A. Barber, S. T. D., and the Rev. 
Henry Johnston were elected members of the Execu- 
tive Committee. 

Mr. Francis J. Murdoch was reelected Secretary. 
Dr. Myers Hunter, Orphanage Physician. Mr. Hanrl- 
ton C. Jones, Orphanage Attorney, Mr. Francis O. 
Cla?'kson, Treasurer of the En-lowment Find, and 
Rev. John L. Jackson. Treasurer of the Building 
Fund were all reelected. 

The Chairman appointed Rev. Willis Clark and W. 

B. Balthis to represent the Orphanage at the East 



Carolina Convention at Edenton, and Rev. E. W. Hal- 
leck and H. A. Bondon to attend the Convention of 
the Diocese of North Carolina at Warrenton. 

Luncheon was served at Baker Cottage upon the 
adjournment of the meeting. 



NOTES FROM FRIENDLY HALL 




Our Student Branch Auxiliary meeting for Febru- 
ary was one of the most interesting ones of the year. 
After the business meeting and a splendid report 
from the Annual Meeting in Wilmington, given by 
Mrs. Wicker, Mr. Wicker answered for us all the 
questions Avhich had accumulated in the Question 
Box. The questions were very good ones, touching 
upon subjects vital to us as Christian women; and 
the clear, direct, and interesting answers which the 
Rector gave were most satisfactory. The discussion 
continued while supper was being served. It was a 
pleasure to have the Wickers and Miss Bowen with 
us for this meeting. 

On Sunday, February 9th, a new course was be- 
gun in the Student Class. Tt is a discussion course 
called "The Teachings of Jesns for Youth." Each 
discussion is based on a direct quotation from the 
Bible. The first subject to be considered was "The 
Cost of being a follower of Jesus." Others will be 
"The Place of Pleasure in life," "Should we have 
Prohibition?," Our attitude toward other races," etc. 
All members of the Class seemed to be very inter- 
ested in this course and we think it should be very 
valuable to us in our daily lives. 

Sunday mornings will be very happy times for a 
group of us at Friendly Hall during Bent. About six 
or eight have made a Lenten resolution to attend the 
early service of Holy Communion each Sunday dur- 
ing Rent. The time between breakfast and class- 
time is spent reading a very lovely book called "By 
An Unknown Disciple". It is a series of imaginery 
stories woven about the life of our Bord. 

MARY TARRY, 
Publicity Chairman Student Branch. 



VOLUME L 



rhe Mission Herald 



WILMINGTON, N. C. MARCH, 1936 



NUMBER 3 



BISHOP'S LETTER 



On Sunday, February sixteenth, I preached and 
celebrated Holy Communion in St. Gabriel's, Faison 
at 11 :00 A. M. I was assisted in the service by the 
Rector, Rev. James O. Beckwith, who is making full 
proof of his ministry in the Clinton-Faison-Burgaw 
field. 

On Monday, the seventeenth, in St. Martin's 
Church, Charlotte, I spoke to the women of that fine, 
progressive parish. 

On Tuesday, the eighteenth) I attended the annual 
meeting of the Board of Managers of the Thomp- 
son Orphanage in Charlotte. As 1937 marks the 
fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the Orphan- 
age, it was decided to arrange for a jubilee celebra- 
tion at some time during the year and a Committee 
of seven persons, representing the three North Caro- 
lina dioceses, was appointed to make suitable ar- 
rangements in connection with the proposed cele- 
bration. 

The East Carolina members of the Committee are 
Mrs. W. N. Tillinghast of Fayetteville and the Rev. 
W. R. Noe. 

On Wednesday, the nineteenth. I made an address 
at the State Sunday School Convention in Winston- 
Salem. 

On Saturday, the twenty-second, I officiated, with 
the Rev. C. A. Ashby. at a wedding in Edenton. 

On Sunday morning, the twenty-third, I preached, 
confirmed eight persons presented by the Rev. Edwin 
F. Moseley and celebrated Holy Communion in the 
Church of the Advent, Williamston. 

On the evening of the same day, I preached in 
St. Martin's Church, Hamilton. 

From the afternoon of the twenty-fourth until 
the afternoon of the twenty-fifth, I had the blessed 
privilege of attending the Clergy Conference in 
Kinston. Jt was a fine helpful meeting and I am 
happy to feel that our clergy went back to their 
parishes and missions Avith renewed zeal and fresh 
courage. Bersonally, the conference meant more to 
me than I can well express and the Lenten season 
is proving to be a richer experience because of the 
loving fellowship during those twenty-four hours. 

On Thursday night, the twenty-seventh, accom- 
panied by the Rev. W. R. Noe, I went to Trinity 
Church, Lumberton, where I preached at the first 
of a series of Thursday night services which Mr. 
Noe has arranged for this Lent. 



On Sunday morning, March first, I preached, con- 
firmed eight persons presented by the Rev. W. H. R. 
Jackson and celebrated Holy Communion in the 
Church of the Holy Cross, Aurora. Thanks to the 
gracious courtesy of the Methodist minister, who 
attended the service with his people, I spoke to a 
crowded church. 

Tn the afternoon at 2:30 I preached and confirmed 
one person presented by Mr. Jackson in St, John's 
'Church, Bonnerton. 

Later in the afternoon I assisted Mr. Jackson in 
conducting the funeral of my dear friend, Mr. 
Charles Dixon, in the Church of the Holy Cross, 
Aurora. Mr. Dixon was a true Christian, a loyal 
Churchman and a great friend. He will be sadly 
missed by his many friends in the diocese. 

On the evening of the first, I preached and con- 
firmed three persons, presented by the Rev. John B. 
Brown, in St. Jude's, Aurora. 

On Wednesday the fourth, I made my annual 
visit to Grace Church, Charleston, where I preached 
to a large congregation at the special Lenten Com- 
munity Service. 

On Sunday morning, the eighth, I preached, con- 
firmed four persons presented by the Rev. Lawrence 
M. Fenwick, and celebrated Holy Communion in St. 
Paul's Church, Beaufort. 

Tn the afternoon I preached in St. Clement's 
Church, Beaufort. 

T trust that our people generally are making full 
use of this blessed Lenten season by using the For- 
ward Movement Manual daily, attending all of the 
Sunday and week-day services, giving special atten- 
tion to Bible study and earnest prayer, and above 
all by making an earnest effort to walk very close 
to our blessed Lord on the journey through Geth- 
semane and Calvary to the new and glorious life of 
Easter morning. 

Faithfully and affectionately 

Your friend and Bishop, 

THOMAS C. DARST 



MR. JOHN STERLING ARMFIELD TO ENTER 
SEMINARY 



Mr. John Sterling Armfield, of St. John's, Fay- 
etteville, who is a senior at the University of North 
Carolina, will enter the Virginia Seminary this fall. 
Mr. Armfield is the grandson of the late Rev. John 
S. Moody. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



THE MISSIONARY CRISIS 



The National Council in session in New York, Feb- 
ruary 11th, 12th and 13th, made drastic cuts affect- 
ing the whole misionary work of the Church and bal- 
anced the Budget for 1936. They offset this seeming 
disaster by presenting the total amount of the deficit, 
the apparently modest amount of $127,100, as a sum 
to be raised by special gifts to be made prior to 
March 31st next. 

The National Council believes that misionary loyal- 
ists will pay this sum over and above all present 
pledges and has inaugurated a Church-wide effort, 
declaring its belief that these cuts "will not have to 
be made." To vindicate this judgment in the time 
limit set there must be swift response. Council, aid- 
ed by a summary of the outlook from its President, 
Bishop Cook, presented the situation in this state- 
ment: 

The Situation 
Budget — Emergency Schedule___$2,313,115 
Specific Reductions— Net (Final). 36,351 
Basic Budget $2,276,764 

Less Estimated Lapsed Balances-- 45,000 
Estimated Expenditures $2,231,764 

Estimated Net Income as of February 

12, 1936 2,104,664 

Prospective Deficit $ 127,100 

To meet this deficit the following reductions will 
be made as of March 31, 1936, unless this money is 
raised. The reductions are for items totalling $158,- 
917 as expenditures will have been made on these 
items the first three months of this year. 

Under the advice of a special committee headed by 
the Bishop of Chicago the following- schedule of re- 
ductions was unanimously adopted : 
Domestic Missions 

Aided Dioceses $15,195 

Domestic Districts 33,488 $ 48,683 

Foreign Missions 

Foreign $47,577 

Extra Continental 19.744 

Latin America 12,513 79.834 

Departments 20,600 

American Church Institute for 

Negroes 3,800 

Cooperating Agencies 6,000 

Total $158,917 

National Council, reluctant to believe that any sueh 
further reductions should be imposed upon mission- 
ary work and workers already suffering from pro 



gressive annual slashes through the past five years, 
has uttered a ringing challenge to Churchmen to rise 
in missionary loyalty above the difficulties of a time 
when Christianity itself is challenged by a mounting 
paganism. 

March 3 1st next, when the first quarter of the year 
comes to an end. is the date when the answer to this 
call, must be made. 

The figures given here cannot possibly reveal the 
meaning of these tabulated statements. Earlier re- 
ductions have left in the budgets of Aided Dioceses, 
Domestic Districts and Foreign Fields little more 
than the salaries of American and foreign men and 
women workers, so that upon every Bishop now falls 
the well nigh impossible task to choose those workers 
who must be dropped, thus irreparably injuring 
causes to which they have given their lives. 

The National Council was reminded pointedly by 
its President, Bishop Cook, that "It is unfair to those 
who have gone out in the name of the Church with 
the assurance that the Church will uphold their 
hands and support their efforts, now to notify them 
that the work must be discontinued and that their 
services will no longer be required." 

Once the reductions had been made and the Bud- 
get balanced the National Council set itself to the 
task of devising plans to restore every worker and 
bit of work affected by the cuts. Obligation was 
placed upon Bishop Cook, President of the Council, 
and the other national officers of the Church to or- 
ganize and conduct an immediate Church-wide effort 
thoroughly to inform every Churchman and to ex- 
haust every possible means by which prompt giving 
may be insured. No particular plan is stressed. Any 
plan is satisfactory which provides that every indi- 
vidual within or friendly to the Church be reached. 

The National Council, in addition to its call for im- 
mediate giving, searches for the causes which chill 
loyalty to the missionary enterprise. 

"Very much deeper and very much larger," de- 
clares the Council, "is a further problem involving 
the life of the Church itself. We know that we are 
living- in a world where the tides are moving very 
swiftly and one of these is a resurgent tide of pagan- 
ism. The clash of forces at home and abroad is at 
bottom the old apocalyptic spiritual warfare between 
Christ and Caesar. We cannot escape strife ; we can 
escape the shame of coAvardice and apostasy. 

"Therefore, we feel that beyond this important 
and urgent and immediate need there is a needed 
call to the whole Church to reawaken and to every 
communicant of the Church to move up into the com- 
radeship of Christ. 

"We rejoice in the contribution being made by the 
Forward Movement Commission and its moving and 






MARCH, 1936 



stirring messages day by day. But there can be no 
advance of the Church unless it is expressed in mov- 
ing out into a world of doubt and darkness, bringing 
that radiance of redemption which Christ alone can 
create through His Church." 

March 31st, then, is the date by which gifts must 
be received at Church Missions House, designated 
"to prevent cuts." The total to be raised by this 
date is $127,100. 

the: national council, 

Church Missions House 
281 Fourth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 



$18,000 PLEDGED TO SAVE MISSION WORK 



CHICAGO LAUNCHES DRIVE FOR MISSIONARY 
FUNDS 



Chicago. — In response to the call from National 
Council for increased missionary funds, Dr. Edwin J. 
Randall, superintendent of city missons and secretary 
of the Diocesan Council, is launching a drive to raise 
$9,200. This amount represents the difference be- 
tween the $54,000 pledged to the National Council 
from the diocese for 1936 and the asking of $63,200 
from the Council. 

With the approval of the Bishop, Dr. Randall hopes 
in the course of the year to raise the amount as a 
means of helping in avoiding any further cuts in the 
missionary work of the Church. 



CHURCHMEN MOVE QUICKLY TO PREVENT 
BUDGET CUTS 



New York. -Gifts from prompt contributors in the 
diocese of Springfield, Colorado. Rochester and New 
York were received by the National Council treasu- 
rer February 29th. A check for $10 was sent "to 
help reduce the national (impending) debt." A 
check for $25 "to be used for the 1936 budget This 
came to me unexpectedly and I know of no better 
way to use it." A promise of $30 toward Bishop Col- 
more 's threatened cut of $3,862 came from a tourist 
just back from a West Indies cruise. Another giver 
Avrites : 

"I spent a part of yesterday afternoon in reading 
current mimbers of the Church papers. You know 
what I found. I am old-fashioned enough to "pay as 
T go" and do not believe in running into debt, but 
I also believe in carrying on and once we put a hand 
to the wheel not turning back — keep going! 

"Enclosed find my check for $100 to apply on the 
deficit for Foreign Missions. . . . 

"P S. — My daughter is sending a check also 
($50)." 



Council Reports Special Measures Used in Several 

Dioceses; Missionary Leaders Stress 

Urgent Need. 



New York.— Gifts and pledges totalling $18,000 
were received by the National Council within ten 
days after the Council meeting, as a result of the 
news reports of that meeting and before the printed 
statement of the situation had been distributed by the 
Council. 

These gifts represent the earliest results in the cur- 
rent undertaking to increase the Council's resources 
before March 31st and thus prevent the cuts which 
must otherwise become effective then. 

Fearing that a misapprehension exists in some peo- 
ple's minds that this is an effort to secure gifts from 
"rich" people only, the National Council's treasurer, 
Dr. Lewis B. Franklin, has urged that "every gift. 
large and small, is not only needed but welcome." 

On February 16th, two days after the Council had 
adjourned, one member of the Council, the Rev. Dr. 
George P. T. Sargent, rector of St. Bartholomew's 
Church,, New York, distributed to his congregation 
the Council's statement in printed form and preached 
on the necessity of strengthening the Church's mis- 
sion work. 

"If each member of St. Bartholomew's and of 
every parish," Dr. Sargent said, "would be a partner 
with Christ and systematically give as God has pros- 
pered him, then St. Bartholomew's and each parish 
and diocese would do its share and there would be 
enough and to spare. The result would be a con- 
sciousness of God's Presence and favor, of our part- 
nership with Him which would make life a great joy- 
ous adventure." 

Bishop Gravatt of West Virginia promptly called 
a meeting' of his clergy for a day in February and 
asked for specific projects to present to his diocese. 

Bishop Finlay of Upper South Carolina is empha- 
sizing the value of personal interviews in order to in- 
form Church people of the situation. 

Bishop Stires, also a Council member, met with 
some of his clergy the day the Council adjourned, 
and he and Bishop Cook, the council president, and 
Rev. Edmund L. Souder of China presented the prob- 
lem. Bishop Stires asked his clergy to deal with the 
matter in their pulpits the following Sunday and he 
is sending a letter to each parish and mission in his 
diocese asking a gift in addition to what they have 
pled«ed. Preaching to the great congregation in St. 
John's Cathedral. New York, at Bishop Kroll's con- 
secration on February 20th, Bishop Stires made the 



6 



THE MISSION HERALD 



most of that opportunity to emphasize the importance 
of every Church member's part in fulfilling the 
Church's mission. 

The other side of the shield, the desperate hardship 
which the cuts will cause if they are not prevented by 
March 31st, is indicated by a note from Bishop Green 
of Mississippi. The amount involved, $894, it was 
asserted, will seem small and negligible in its effects 
only to the uninformed person who has not realized 
on what a narrow margin the Church's domestic mis- 
sionary work is now operating and how year after 
year of reductions have undermined it. 

The Council appropriations to Mississippi are used 
for rural work, college work, and work among Neg- 
roes. The $894 is the amount applied on the salary 
of the Rev. Val H. Sessions whose rural work extends 
into three counties, with seven missions. His com- 
municant list, about 265. is constantly weakened by 
transfers to other parts of the country, but new con- 
firmations bring the total up again. His people paid 
in full all their apportionments and assessments for 
1935. 

Ten of Mississippi's mission clergy are receiving 
less than $1,200 a year, and eight are receiving less 
than $1,000. Even these salaries could not be main- 
tained without the aid of a special Whitsunday offer- 
ing whch for two years the diocese has used for this 
purpose. 

Bishop Schmuck of Wyoming writes: 

"I note that the proposed cut to Wyoming is 
$4,144. I don't know, if I have to take it out, where 
it can be without closing up or wrecking the Indian 
work." 



A CHANGE IN THE VESTRY 



Forward Movement has done something to our 
vestry. It used to be that we met once a quarter, 
and at that with reluctance on all hands. A perverse 
spirit seemed to settle down on us eleven men, who 
in almost any other situation were kindly fellows. 
Perhaps it was because we met only for business; 
that is. the dreary business of debt, interest pay- 
ments, the coal bill, and roof repairs. We left some 
of the payment of all this to the Woman's Auxiliary, 
and even sometimes to the Church school. Our rec- 
tor writhed through vestry meetings like a man on a 
rack— and T fear we took a grim pleasure in torment- 
ing him. He was afraid of us as a vestry 

That was the old rector. Our new rector came 
quite guiltless of any vestry complex. He looked 
upon us as his natural friends and helpers. A't our 
first meeting he made a prayer that was anything but 
perfunctory. The financial business was done with 
in fifteen minutes, and then the rector launched out 



and asked us what were our plans for the parish 
Forward Movement. 

Well, we had not so much as heard of the Forward 
Movement, so he gave us the gist of it then and there. 
That took a half hour which passed quickly, and then 
the rector came back with the question : what did 
we think our part coidd be? In short, he politely 
showed up our ignorance, got us to confess it and to 
agree to meet often and spend most of the vestry 
time learning what we ought to know. 

We meet monthly now and look forward Ito it. 
Each time one of us gives a prepared talk upon some 
assigned subject. We are covering the missions of the 
Church. My talk last week was on Puerto Rico. I 
feel I know Bishop Colmore personally. I certainly 
am ashamed that those native nurses had to be lot go. 

Next Saturday we are goin£>: to do an unheard of 
thing. We are to meet in the Church at 12 and begin 
a vestry retreat. The rector is calling in a mission 
priest, and promises that we shall have all the time 
we want to talk things out and think things out and 
pray things out. 

We are still plain fellows and not priggish about 
our new attitude. We've been reading Bishop An- 
derson's "Letters to Laymen" and have come to the 
conviction that being on the vestry of the Church can 
give more joy and offer more solid satisfaction than 
airy trusteeship or lodge office in the everyday world. 

— Living Church 



MRS. F. A. HABERSH*.M TO VISIT EAST 
CAROLINA 



The people of East Carolina are indeed fortunate 
to have the opportunity of hearing Mrs. F. A. Haber- 
sham lecture, and seeing the moving pictures she has 
made in the Mission Fields. She will visit only two 
places in the diocese. St. James', Wilmington, and 
St. Paul's, Greenville. 

Mrs. Habersham has traveled extensively in her 
missionary work, Philippine Islands, Honolulu, Ja 
pan, China, Alaska, and the Ho'ly Lands. In each 
country she has made moving pictures of the miss ; on- 
ary work of her own volition, not for any remunera- 
tion but for the joy she receives in doin? this work. 
However a s'lver offering is taken after her lecture 
to helr> defrav her expenses. 

In Greenville she will show pictures of the work 
in Jerusalem. St. Paul's Church, Greenville, extends 
a cordial invitation to people of all the surrounding 
churches to come, hear, see and join in this interest- 
ins? program, Thursday, March 27, 8 P. M. at the 
church. 

Department of Publicity 
of the Woman's Auxiliary 



MARCH. 1936 



RURAL CONFERENCE PROGRAM 



Rev. J. Leon Malone 



Following is the program of the Rural Workers' 

Conference on Confirmation to be held in Holy 
Innocents' Church, Seven Springs, N. C, on the 
fifth Sunday in March: 

11:00 A. M. Morning Prayer and sermon. (The 
Gtergy will please vest for this Service and sit with 
the choir. The Rev. James D. Bockwith. Clinton. 
N. G, the youngest Clergyman in the Diocese and 
member of the Rural Work Committee will preach 
the sermon.) 

12:00 Noon. Dinner., served by the congregation 
of Holy Innocents'. 

2:00 P. M. Afternoon Session, with the following 
and other discussions : 

1. Recruiting Candidates for Confirmation. 

Leader. Rev. W. R. Noe. (15 Minutes.) 

2. Training Candidates for Confirmation. 

Leader, Rev. A. H. Marshall. (15 Minutes.) 

3. "After Confirmation, What 1 ?" 

Leader, Rev. John W. I lardy. (15 Minutes.) 
The Rural Work Committee urges the cooperation 
in particular of the Missionary Clergy of the Diocese. 
Wc believe, and Bishop Darst has expressed his 
hearty approval, that their attendance at this Con- 
ference will mean far more to the life of the Church 
in the Diocese in the long run than the one or more 
Services they would hold that day. The Committee 
is not trying to make elaborate plans for the rural 
work, but it wants to get those interested in the 
work together, both Clergy and Laity, and get ideas 
from them. We especially appeal to the Missionary 
Clergy to be present and urge representatives from 
their parishes and missions to attend. 



HOW TO FIND HOLY INNOCENTS' CHURCH 



The members of Holy Innocents' Parish and the 
community are glad to welcome the meeting of the, 
missionary clergy of the Diocese, as well as the 
laymen who may come, to our parish on the fifth 
Sunday in this month as was arranged for at a 
recent meeting of the Special Committee on Rural 
Church Work. 

There has been so much confusion in the past as 
to the location of the Church that I am writing 
briefly the following information as to how to 
find it. 

The Church building is located five miles east of 
Seven Springs on the Kinston-Seven Springs road, 
Highway 55. Those coming by the way of Kenans- 



vide should follow highway 11 about eleven c 
twelve miles to Kornegay's (old store). There turn 
to left on dirt road i 1 1 to Lydell (P. G. Smith's 
store), then straight on about one mile to cross 
roads at Daily's Chapel. There turn to right and 
keep plain road for about two miles to the Church 
on the hill near the large water mill. 

rhose coming by Kinston, cross the river at Cas- 
well Street bridge and follow pavement four miles 
to Jackson's store, then turn to right (also paved; ; 
follow this to end of pavement, about four miles, 
then straight on dirt road about five miles to Church. 

Those coming by Seven Springs will follow Seven 
Springs-Kinston road five miles. This is dirt road 
55. 

Will ask all those expecting to attend this meeting 
to please write me, so that we may know how to 
prepare lunch. 

This is to be the first of these fifth Sunday meet- 
ings and as I have the honor of being a member of 
the above named Committee. I hope we may have 
a good attendance of those interested in the rural 
church work of the Diocese, whether Clergy or Lay- 
men. 

Very truly yours, 

OSCAR HARDY 
Seven Springs, N. C. 
March 10, 1936. 



DELGABO MISSION 



Lent 1936 — Speakers 



Thursdays 7 :30 P. M.— 

February 27th — Rev. Alexander Miller, Rector, 
St. Paul's P. E. Church. , 

March 5th — Rev. John Benners Gibble, retired, 
formerly rector, Church of the Good Shepherd. 

March 12th— Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst, D. D., 
Bishop, Diocese of Eas't Carolina. 

March 19th — Rev. Walter R, Noe, Executive Sec- 
retary, Diocese of East Carolina. 

March 26th— Rev. E. W. Ilalleck, Rector. St. 
John's P. E. Church. 

April 2nd — Rev. Edward C. McConnell, Rector, 
Church of the Good Shepherd. 

April 9th — Invited to unite with St. Paul's at 
their Church. 8 :00 P. M. 

Good Friday, April 10th— Ashley T. St. Amand, 
Lay-reader-in-charge. 

Delgado Mission invites you to come and hear 
these speakers. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



The Mission Herald 

ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 
Published Monthly except July and August at 

507 Southern Building 
WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor 

REV. WALTER R. NOE 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 

RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 

MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 
Advertising rates furnished on application. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to receive 
their papers, should promptly notify the Business Man- 
ager, giving when necessary, both the old and new ad- 
dress. 



ANOTHER CUT 



The Department of Domestic Missions of the 
National Council has notified East Carolina that 
unless the money necessary to balance the budget 
of the General Church is raised by March 31, 1936, 
another cut will have to be made, and that East 
Carolina's part will be $509.00. 

Our appropriation has been reduced from $5,700.00 
to $2,509.00 by former cuts and another cut of 
$509.00 will leave us only $2,000.00 for 1936. 

The appropriation is for 'the salaries of our colored 
clergy and teachers. 

After a careful study of our colored work by a 
representative of the National Council, we were 
notified that the Department of Domestic Missions 
would recommend to the National Council an in- 
crease of $1,900.00 in our appropriations for 1936. 

Instead of being able to give us this increase, 
which is needed, the National Council will have to 
give us another cut unless something is done about 
it at once. 

We cannot blame the National Council. It says 
that East Carolina should have a larger appropri- 
ation. It is willing to cooperate with us, if the 
people of the Church will make it possible by their 
gifts. 

We cannot expect other Dioceses to raise all of 
this money. They have some real financial problems 
of their own. 

The General Church is making its appeal to the 
people of East Carolina as well as to the people of 



the other dioceses and we are confident that all 
of our people will want to help. 

At the recent meeting of the clergy a great deal 
of interest was shown in the discussion of this mat- 
ter and several of the clergy stated that their par- 
ishes and missions would help. 

If other parish groups and individuals will write 
the Bishop or the Diocesan office that they want 
to have a part in this work we can easily raise in 
this special way. not only the $509.00, but the full 
amount needed for our work in 1936. 



DID YOU TAKE OR SEE THE MISSION HERALD 
IN 1888? 



^ The Mission Herald was first published in 1886, 
fifty years ago. 

If you were a subscriber at that time or saw the 
paper during that year, please write us. 

The next issue will be a special Anniversary num- 
ber and we would like to publish some messages 
from our friends who have enjoyed the paper for 
a number of years and from any who are now being 
helped by it. 

We are «lad to be able to announce that the Mis- 
sion Herald is now going recularly each month to 
every home in a large number of our parishes and 
missions. 

We hope that all the parishes and missions will 
help us to place it in every home in the Diocese by 
accepting our plan. 



THE CHURCH IN A CHANGING WORLD 

We would have to admit first that the world is 
changing. Whether the changes are for better or 
worse is yet to be determined, and since the function 
of the Church has been to proclaim a world that 
might be considered a place where the Kingdom of 
God might exist, it would seem that the function of 
the Church is to try and see that these changes which 
we are undergoing are for the better. 

The great majority of men who have taken these 
chanoes to heart and who are doing their best to 
see that the world is changing for better rather than 
for worse, are anxious to have a world that is fit 
for men to live in. Such a world will depend upon 
social justice, righteous dealings, fairness and eco- 
nomic distribution, so that abuses of the past, like 
starvation, hatred, greed, bad housing and working 
conditions, be abolished. To make a world fit for 
men to live in, is the hope of right-thinking men. 
Some of these champions are very conservative, some 
are very radical, but their ideal is the same. The 
conservative believes it will be a better world if 



MARCH, 1936 



business, honestly managed by private interests and 
with little interference from government, is allowed 
full sway. Others behove that only by complete 
regulation of all industry, even to the socializing of 
it all, will a proper world be built. In between 
these two schools of thought there are a thousand 
varying opinions. But 'the 'object is the same — the 
bu.lding of a world fit for men to live in. 

Now the Church in proclaiming righteousness, also 
strives for a world that is fit for men to live in, 
but her interests go deeper, for she is confident 
that no matter how fine a world is ever built up 
and no matter how fit it might be for men to live 
in, it still cannot be considered a world that is fit 
to be called the Kingdom of God, unless there arc 
men who are fit to live in it. We are working not 
only for a world that is fit for men to live in, but 
We must make men fit to live in a world. And that 
is the chief function of the Church in all of this 
changing world. 

A recent writer on Russia, who had unusual op- 
portunities for observation, says that if all the peo- 
ple of Russia were fed, clothed and shod and all 
the economic problems solved,, man would still be 
faced, in a world that science tells us will someday 
be a burnt-out cinder, with the questions of 'where 
did Ave come from, and why are we here, and where 
are we going?'' The Church as the agent of re- 
ligious tradition is constantly trying to answer such 
questions. 

Our ancestors lived in a rather simple world. It 
probably did not appear simple to them, but to us 
in a more complex world it seems, philosophically, 
such a nice, easy place to have lived in. 

With our expansion of science, this simple world 
has gone. Fortunately, the Theistic school, which 
is the dominant school of thought in the educated 
group of religious people has long since made its 
reconciliation to science. Our belief has grown in a, 
Cod who is a far greater God than our ancestors 
ever dreamed about. He is a God whose process 
of creation is constantly going on and who still is 
the Mind behind a greater universe. Only a great 
and tremendous God who is capable of creating 
such a universe could be understood. And while 
it is true that the average man's conception of this 
God is far behind the academic mind that is teaching 
about him, men are gradually grasping the idea 
theologically. 

Without such a God, the world revealed by science 
would be nothing but a heartless machine. It would 
lack purpose, and we can say, as perhaps just an 
average people interested in the role of 'the Church, 
this heartless machine would drive us either into a 
complete anarchism or a fatalistic idea that it did 



not make very much difference whether we or any- 
body else lived or not. It is all very easy to talk 
about loving one's neighbor, but, if there is not a 
Father in Heaven, and hence a human family, there 
is not a human relationship. We continue with the 
Church in spite of many fools who must be tolerated 
gladly, for in it we sec the one thought that the 
problems of the world at bottom are not what Karl 
Marx proclaims economic problems, but are pri- 
marily spiritual problems. 

The Church, therefore, calls us in the Lenten 
Season to make a serious effort to proclaim God in 
His majesty and greatness. We are asked to take 
Him seriously and let Him direct our lives and then 
He will direct our world. If we can bring men to 
the religious thought that alone it is impossible to 
face the changes of the changing world, and only 
through a power higher and greater than ourselves 
can we find a solution to our troubles, we will have 
proved that the Church today, as always, has the 
greatest work to do of any of the world's institu- 
tions. Serious effort on the part of Church mem- 
bers during Lent will help towards this desired end. 
— Editorial, Southern Churchman. 



BISHOP'S APPOINTMENTS FOR APRIL 



April 5th — Palm Sunday— St. James'. Wilmington, 

11 :00 A. M. 
6th to 10th — Noon-day Lenten Services, Garrick The- 
ater, Philadelphia. 
12th — Raster— Church of the Good Shepherd, 

Wilmington, 11:00 A. M. 
19th— St. John's, Wilmington, 11 :00 A. M. 

St. Paul's, Wilmington, 8:00 P. M. 
21st — Convention, Diocese of South Florida. 
25th — Executive Committee Camp Leach, St. 
Paul's Parish House, Greenville, 11 :00 
A. M. . 
26th— St. Barnabas', Snow Hill, 11:00 A. M. 
Colored Mission, Farmville, 3:30 P. M. 
Emmanuel Church, Farmville, 8 :00 P. M. 
29th — Department of Evangelism, Federal 
Council of Churches, East Orange, 
N. J. 



PLEASE WATCH YOUR EXPIRATION DATE 



If you will send us $1.00 when your subscription 
expires, it will save us the expense of sending you 
a statement. 

THE MISSION HERALDv 

507 Southern Building, 

Wilmington, N. C. 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD 



THE GATES OF HELL 



Sometimes we are likely to be a little too com- 
placent about our Lord's promises, as recorded in 
Holy Scripture, and to overlook the fact that every 
promise that He made was contingent upon very 
definite action on our own part. For example, He 
promised to be with His Church to the end of the 
world — presumably meaning both its most remote 
spot aeographically and also its terminus in time. 
But He made that promise only after giving His 
Church a definite command: "Go ye into all the 
world and preach the Gospel. ..." We may well 
believe that His promise was not an isolated and 
independent thing, but rather one definitely con- 
ditioned by our own fulfilment of the plain command 
that accompanied it. 

So also our Lord promised that the pates of hell 
should not prevail against His Church — but on what 
condition ^ "Thou art the "Rock," lie said to St. 
Peter, and through him to all of the faithful who 
acknowledge Christ as the Son of the Living God, 
"and upon this rock will I build my Church; and 
the gates of hell shall not prevail against it." Again 
the conditioned promise : the rock of faith must not 
crumble if the promise is to be fulfilled. 

These things have a very definite and important 
bearing on the situation of our own Church today. 
Our Lord did not promise that the Protestant Epis- 
copal Church in the U. S. A. would endure as a living 
element in Christendom until the end of time, nor 
did he guarantee that the gates of hell would not 
prevail against it. Other Christian Churches have 
been virtually wiped out in the past, and doubtless 
will be in future. One thinks naturally of the apos- 
tolic Jewish Church in Palestine, of the vigorous 
Church that flourished in North Africa in the time 
of St. Augustine, of the Nestorian Church in the 
Orient, and later the medieval Church in China and 
Japan. In our own day there is the great Russian 
Orthodox Church, not entirely destroyed but reduced 
to a shadow of its former self. 

In all of these and many other cases conditions 
both external and internal have combined to destroy 
a section of the Christian Church. It is notable that 
it lias always been this combination of external and 
internal forces that has wrought the havoc. Exter- 
nal causes alone have never been sufficient to ovcr- 
throAV the Church or any part of it. There is con- 
stant warfare between the Church and the world. 
The pates of hell are always yawning to engulf the 
Church, but never do they prevail except when the 
Church itself ncsdects to fulfil its part of the bar- 
gain upon which our Lord's promises are condi- 
tioned. Denial of essential elements of the Catholic 
Faith, loss of social vision, worldly greed, lack of 



missionary zeal — these are the devil's allies within 
the Church that betray our Lord anew and make 
it possible for the gates of hell to prevail in this or 
that faithless corner of the Kingdom of God. 

And how strong are these forces within our own 
Church today? Denial of the Faith? AVc see it on 
every side and in all degrees, from the priest who 
shamelessly repudiates the divinity of Christ, to the 
layman who regards the observance of Lent as hope- 
lessly old-fashioned and out-of-date. Loss of social 
vision? How widespread is the attitude that the 
Church should stick to the Gospel (sic!) and not 
concern itself witli such worldly matters as war. 
poverty, and social injustice. Worldly greed? Why 
does every vacancy in a metropolitan parish that 
pays a good salary draw scores of applications, while 
bishops of remote missionary districts plead for self- 
sacrificing missionaries, clerical and lay? 

But it is the lack of missionary zeal that particu- 
larly concerns us just now. The Church is operating- 
its general missionary work on an emergency sched- 
ule that is barely adequate to maintain it on a sub- 
sistence level. General business conditions have con- 
siderably improved during the past year, and many 
of our people have undoubtedly benefitted by that 
improvement. Yet the National Council has had to 
decree staggering cuts in all departments and co- 
operating agencies and in every aided diocese and 
missionary district, because the expectancies for 1938 
are far below even the emergency schedule. These 
cuts, as fatal to many of our missionary enterprises 
as Shylock's pound of flesh, will go into effect March 
31st unless new contributions and pledges to the 
amount of $150,000 can be secured by that time. 
The amount is not large by any means, but the need 
for it is urgent — how urgent only the missionaries 
in the field fully know. 

Is this Church of ours pomp to fall prey to the, 
insidious forces that bore from within and that alone 
can enable the gates of hell to prevail against it? 
The answer is up to you and me, and every faithful 
member of the Church. And the time for the answer- 
is — Now! — Editorial, Living Church. 



REV. A. H. MARSHALL IN HOSPITAL AT 
WILMINGTON 



The Rev. A. H. Marshall of Southport will have 
to spend a short time in the James Walker Memorial 
Hospital, Wilmington, for examination and treat- 
ment. 

Mr. Marshall is rector of St. Philip's, Southport; 
and St. Thomas', Atkinson, and M'inister-in-charge 
of Grace Church, Whiteville and All Souls', North 
West. 






MARCH. 1936 



11 



ZION PARISH, BEAUFORT COUNTY 



By M. H. Cutler 



The beginning of Church work in Zion Parish, 
Beaufort County, so far as can be learned, was by 
an ancient family by the name of Cutler — Robert 
and Lucy Cutler. Robert Cutler was born in Charles 
Town, New England, October 12. 1709. His wife, 
Lucy Easties, was born in Gloucester County, Vir- 
ginia, March 14, 1716. They were married in the 
town of Bath, February 2, 1733 by the Rev. John 
Geere. They settled on a plantation in Zion Parish. 
Robert Cutler was a lay-reader in the church but 
there is no record of the organization of a parish 
until the year 1823. During this year Zion Parish 
was organized and admitted into union with the dio- 
cese under the rectorship of Rev. Richard S. Mason, 
who, it appears, could give it only occasional ser- 
vices as he had charge of several other points in 
this section. He was aided in hills work, however, 
by the efficient services of Mr. Jarvis B. Buxton 
(lay reader). 

In his address to the Convention of 1824, Bishop 
Ravenscroft mentions visiting Zion Chapel on his 
way from Bath on January 29th, and baptizing 6 
adults and 12 infants, and confirming 24 persons. 

Zion Chapel, as it was then called, was built by 
all denominations — principally by Episcopalians and 
was about one and a half miles from the present site 
of Zion Church. It is known now as Beaver Dam 
Church and is used entirely by the Christian denomi- 
nation. 

From 1825 to 1856 the parish seems to have been 
served by the rectors of St. Peter's, Washington and 
occasionally by pastors Avho had charge of a group 
of churches. Bishop Ravenscroft jn his address to 
the Convention says, "Preached to a large and at- 
tentive congregation". Also, in his address to the 
Convention of 1826 he says "the congregation mani- 
fested great zeal." 

On the 6th day of August, 1855, Mr. Henry L. 
Harney donated a piece of land containing about 
two acres to the vestry of the Parish, which vestry- 
was composed of the following : Riley Eborn, 0. H. P. 
Tankard, Henry L. Harney, W. L. Harney, Giles 
A. Cutler. Marshall H. Cutler, Asa A. Cutler, Norman 
North and Caleb A. Cutler. The latter was a mem- 
ber of the vestry for forty-two years, most of that 
time as Senior Warden. 

This plat of land was given for the purpose of 
erecting a church more centrally located. 

In 1856 the present church building was erected, 
mninlv under the direction and supervision of Mr. 
Henry L. Harney. The building was consecrated 



by Bishop Thomas Atkinson on November 14th of 
the same year. 

Records of baptisms and confirmations date back 
to 1825. 

The records show that the Rev. N. C. Hughes offi- 
ciated in the parish from 1852 to 1856, the Rev. 
Israel Harding from 1856 to 1863 and from that date 
to 1870 the Rev. Luther Eborn served the parish. 
He also served it again from 1876 to 1882. Rev. Mr. 
Eborn was bom and reared in Zion Parish and began 
his long and useful life here as a servant of God. 
The parish for a short time was under the rectorship 
of the Rev. Horace G. Hilton. In the year 1883 the 
Rev. Robert B. Windley became rector of the parish 
and continued until his death in the winter of 1890. 
During the early part of this period, a large and 
comfortable rectory was built on a part of the church 
lot, which still stands there. 

In 1892 the Rev. Francis Joyner was called to the 
parish and for nine years did a wonderful work, 
bringing many into the church by baptism and con- 
firmation. Through his efforts a parish school was 
built and operated for many years. The christian 
training received in this school is much in evidence 
in this and other parishes today. 

For the past thirty-five years the parish has had 
no regular weekly services, except for short periods 
of time. The Rev. N. Harding, rector of St. Peter's, 
Washington, furnished semi-monthly services for a 
long time. Since then the services have been very 
irregular and the interest of the members has sadly 
declined. Yet, while this is true, we look back over 
the past and can thankfully say that this old parish 
has contributed to some of the other parishes of the 
diocese some faithful and devoted Church members, 
and out from its sacred influence have gone two con- 
secrated men of God to serve as His ministers — the 
Rev. Luther Eborn and the Rev. Howard Alligood, 
the latter still serving in the Diocese. 

And I should not fail to mention that there is a 
group of about fifteen noble and christian women 
composing the Woman's Auxiliary, who are doing a 
good work for the Church, being especially noted 
for their charitable gifts to the needy of this and 
other communities. 



APPLES FOR SALE 



Varieties: Old Virginia Winesaps, Staymen 
Winesaps. Albemarle Pippins, Mammoth Black 
Twigs. 

Price: Two dolars a basket, delivered. 

Address: Blue Ridge Industrial School, Bris, 
Greene County, Virginia. 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD 



SCATTERED EPISCOPALIANS IN EAST 
CAROLINA 



By Rev. J. Leon Malone, Chairman Rural Work 
Committee 



For some time we have believed that there was a 
goodly number of Episcopalians in the small towns 
and rural sections of East Carolina where we have 
no churches. We have felt that they should be 
shepherded by the Church, but in mos't instances 
no Clergyman in particular has been responsible 
for them. 

Recently we made a survey of about half of the 
Convocation of Wilmington to locate and get the 
names of as many of these people as possible. We 
found a total number of at least seventy people, in 
twenty towns and communities, a larger congrega- 
tion than many of our parishes and missions have. 
We believe there are others that we did not locate. 

Some of these people may we'll be connected with 
a nearby parish or mission, but in most cases there 
are genuine reasons*, such as distance, etc., why they 
cannot attend the services regularly and take an 
active part in the Church life and activities. 

In several places enough people were found to 
serve as a nucleus for beginning new work. Some 
of the towns in which they live are growing rapidly 
and should be watched closely by the Church, for 
opportunities for new work will certainly arise in 
them. 

Many of those people for many years, even in 
their isolation from the Church, have remained stead- 
fast in their faith in and loyalty to the Church. One 
lady told of her stay in the town for 32 years, of 
how she had to rear her children in another Church, 
and of how much she would like to have her Church 
now. She offers entertainment for the Clergymen, 
and her home to hold the services in if a mission is 
opened there. Every one in the town spoke very 
favorably of her exemplary life in the community. 

Her case and situation is typical of many of these 
scattered members of the Church in East Carolina. 



CALVARY CHURCH, SWAN QUARTER 



(By Mrs. Laura Brown) 

The lot on which Calvary Church is built was given 
by the late Bishop Strange in 1910. It remained 
vacant for several years. During that time who 
we had church services, which at times was at inter- 
vals of several months, they were held sometimes in 
the Court House, sometimes in the school building, or 
in the churches of other denominations. 



After the donation of the lot by Bishop Strange 
the few members of the church, about half a dozen 
organized a Woman's Auxiliary, and we began try- 
ing to raise funds to begin the building of a church. 
None of us can recall exactly the number of oyster 
suppers, salad suppers, turkey dinners or bazaars we 
had in our efforts to raise funds. 

Finally in 1923 our beloved Bishop Darst gave us 
$1,000 to begin the building of a church. We had at 
that time about $400 which had been raised by the 
Woman's Auxiliary, and each member of our church 
gave as much as he could, and members of other 
churches subscribed generously to our building fund. 

From 1922 to 1924 the Rev. Mr. Heyes was our 
rector, and it was his plan to build a parish house. 
However, before the building actually began Mr. 
Heyes had left and the majority of the members de- 
cided it would be better to build a small church. 

In the meantime Mr. Heyes had been followed by 
the Rev. Sidney Matthews, under whose supervision 
the church was built. The plans submitted were 
greatly enlarged upon, and so far we have been un- 
able to complete the building. Some of our best 
workers haA'e moved away and another discouraging 
thing we face so much of the time is the absence of a 
minister, as so much of the time Ave do not have reg- 
ular services, and interest and work in the church 
lags. 

However, Ave are hoping this year to do greater 
things. In January Bishop Darst gave us $400 Avith 
Avhich to complete the vestry room, and we are hop- 
in«- by our OAvn efforts to raise something toward the 
completion of the church soon. 

NOTE : Mrs. Laura BroAvn is the daughter of the 
late Rev. Samuel S. Barber. Avho was the first resident 
Episcopal minister to preach in Hyde County. 



LENTEN PLANS 



Grace Church, Plymouth. Lenten Study, "Re- 
ligion in the Home". 

St. AndreAv's, Columbia. Weekly Study Class; 
books ''Religion in Family Life", and the Prayer 
Book ; participated in the World Day of Prayer, 
February 28. 

St. David's. CresAvell. Ash Wednesday Service, 
Communion at 9:00 A. M. World Day of Prayer 
with other congregations. Every Tuesday, after- 
noon service, particularly for the children. Fridays, 
evening service. Special Lenten Study, "Religion 
in Family Life". 

Department of Publicity 
of the Woman's Auxiliary 



MARCH, 1936 



13 



ST. JOHN'S, FAYETTEVILLE 



Here's to St. John's Y. P. S. L., 
A notable record these four letters spell. 
"Y" is for youth, may we never suppress itt, 
Nor think the less of it when we do not possess it. 

Alert and alive, it can make its decisions 
While older minds haggle for worn-out opinions. 

It rides over mountains as if they were mole-hills, 
In ventures of faith and in quest of new thrills. 

"P" is for people, with life all before them, 
Let not some old grouch endeavor to floor them. 
They can see with a vision he's lost with the years, 
And can march on untrammeled by thoughts of 
his fears. 

"S" signifies service; the one thing they stand for; 
Whatever the task, they've a heart and a hand for; 
"L" represents leaguers; a right worthy factor 
In the life of the parish ; in the strength of each other. 

They're a rollicking crowd, full of spirit and fun, 
When they need not be serious, and the work is 

all done. 
They'll rig you and dig you and not mean a bit of it, 
That's part of the training; you'll have to submit 

to it. 

But when they get down to some real real situation, 
Believe it or not, there's a marked transformation. 
And best of all, in work, play or pleasure, 
They're never unmindful of God and their Saviour. 

, A. B. 

FOUR SCHOLARSHIPS TO CAMP LEACH 



In the following letter to Church School Superin- 
tendents of the Diocese, the Rev. George S. Gresham, 
Chairman, has announced that the Department of 
Religious Education will give four scholarships to 
Camp Leach to members of Church Schools for the 
best papers on some missionary subject or project : 

"This year the Department of Religious Education 
is offering four scholarships to Camp Leach for the 
best papers written by our boys and girls on a 
Missionary subject or project. The purpose of this 
contest is to stimulate 'interest in the Mite Box 
Offering. One scholarship will be given for each 
of the Camps. One scholarship to the Senior Camp 
to the boy or girl over fifteen, one to the Junior 
Boys' Camp to the boy between twelve and fifteen, 
one to the Junior Girls' Camp to the girl between 
twelve and fifteen, and one to the Midget Camp to 
the boy or girl between nine and twelve, who hand 
in the best papers. 

"Each Church School must hand in four papers, 
one for each scholarship, and the papers must be 



in the Diocesan office on or before March 25th. 

"The Department would like to hear from each 
Superintendent whether or not his school has set a 
goal for the Mite Box Offering and if the classes 
of his school have set class goals. Also please re- 
mind the members of your school of the importance 
of the Mite Box Offering. 

Faithfully yours, 

GEORGE S. GRESHAM 
.; . • Chairman of the Department 

of Religious Education." 



THE RECTOR AND CONGREGATION RECOVER 



The first Sunday in Lent the Rev. Worth Wicker 
was holding service in the church. The opening sen- 
tence of his sermon was a plea with the congregation 
to observe Lent. Every one settled down to listen to 
all the reasons why. Mr. Wicker turned toward the 
altar, ended his sermon and went out through the 
Chancel door. Consternation reigned. Mrs. Wicker 
hurried out the side door, this person hurried out, 
that person hurried out. a doctor hurried out. Breath- 
lessly the congregation waited. At last one of the 
vestrymen came out of the Chancel door and said, 
"Mr. Wicker is very ill", and hurried back. 

The choir sang one stanza of the last hymn as they 
marched out. The congregation lingered, every one 
asking every one else what was the trouble? The 
first report was angina pectoris, the second was indi- 
gestion, and in a day or two everyone knew that the 
Rev. Mr. Wicker had low blood pressure and had at- 
tempted to do too much too soon after having had the 
influenza. 

The Rector has recovered from the effects of the 
"flu", and the congregation has recovered from 
fright. 

Department of Publicity 
of the Woman's Auxiliary 



REV. A. C. D. NOE ACCEPTS CALL 



The Rev. A. C. D. Noe has accepted a call to St. 
Thomas'. Bath; Zion, Beaufort County and Trinity, 
Chocowinity. 

Mr. Noe will assist the Bishop in the preparation 
and presentation of some interesting plans for the 
restoration of the Church at Bath. 

Mr. Noe has spent practically all of his ministry 
in East Carolina and during the past few years has 
served St. James', Ayden; St. John's, Pitt County; 
Holy Innocents', Seven Springs, and St. Luke's, 
Winterville. 

Mr. Noe and his family will move to Bath the 
first of April. 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD 



IN MEMORIAM 



REQUIESCAT IN PACE 



Early Monday morning, the seventeenth of Febru- 
ary, 1936, the angel of destiny arrested the life-course 
of Thomas Davis Warren of New Bern, N. C, grand- 
son of Thomas Davis Warren, M. D. and Margaret, 
his wife, and son of the late William Young Warren, 
and Frances Roulhac (Badham), resident of Edenton, 
N. C. 

Mr Warren was born in Chowan County and 
passed most of his boyhood at "Becchwood", the 
family country seat, situated in a grove of lofty 
trees, about one mile from Edenton. 

Following his education at the Edenton Academy, 
Horner Military School and the University of North 
Carolina, he secured his decree in law and practiced a 
few years in various places until he made his home in 
New Bern, where his abilities expanded in service to 
his family, State and country. Like London, New 
Bern is a "man's town", so here his friendships ex- 
tended far and wide amon»' the members of the legal- 
profession and others. 

To mention a few of the many honors accorded him 
during his career he was appointed U. S. District At- 
torney by the late President Wilson, resigning the 
same a year later. He was State Chairman of the 
Democratic Executive Committee and during the 
eight years of leadership one of his colleagues stated 
on one occasion that Mr. Warren did not fail to 
"bring home the bacon". Going back to the days 
when he was a slender youth in college his reports 
showed a very high record of scholarship and Ids 
library now contains a series of volumes which he at- 
tained as the Creek Prize. About two years ago Mr. 
Warren's health failed and though he recovered par- 
tially and resumed his work another serious attack 
followed last summer, then another in December di- 
agnosed as Angina only to be followed by a final 
seizure which terminated his life last Monday. 

Mr. Warren was manned to Miss Mary Agnes 
Stevenson of Kinston, June 8th, 1904. 

■Surviving Mr. Warren are his widow, Mrs. Thomas 
D. Warren, his two children, Thomas D. Warren, Jr., 
and Elizabeth Stevenson Warren, New Bern; his 
mother, Mrs. William Y. Warren, two brothers, J. W. 
Wan-en, M. D„ Bethel; Julien K. Warren, Trenton; 
two sisters, Mary Alethea Warren, Elizabeth Alethea 
Warren, Edenton, nieces, nephews and other rela- 
tives Julien K. Warren was very closely associated 
with his brother Tom Warren as they were law part- 
ners in Trenton for a short while and afterwards by 



those social ties which existed between the two fami- 
lies residing only twenty miles apart. 

Though Mr. Warren had not rounded out the 
Psalmist's allotted life-span, being sixty-four years 
of age, yet his life so embraced those substantial 
achievements, those principles of integrity, those 
tender and admirable qualities that all who knew 
him must say, "This was a man." 

After the service in Christ Church, of which he 
was a member, the deceased was laid to rest in 
Cedar Grove Cemetery, with tin- comforting final 
words pronounced by his former rector, Dr. B. F. 
Huske. of Kinston, assisted by the Rev. Charles Wil- 
liams, present rector of the church. Here in the 
glorious sunshine, surrounded by flowers, symbols 
of the resurrection, the sorrowing relatives and 
friends left him in the care of his divine Protector. 
"Large was his bounty and his soul sincere 
Heav'n did recompense as largely send; 
He gave to Misery all he had a tear, 
He gained from ITcav (t'was all he wish'd) a 
friend." 

MARY ALETHEA WARREN. 



MRS. ELLA GREEN 



Entered into rest on January 25, 1936, the soul 
of Mrs. Ella Green, a most faithful servant of the 
Master, a regular attendant upon the services of this 
Church and its parish organizations throughout a 
long and useful life. 

The Auxiliary will miss her wise counsel and 
advice, her words of encouragement. The Auxili- 
ary, hereby, expresses its love and sympathy to her 
loved ones and directs that a copy be sent to the 
family, one to The Mission Herald and that another 
be incorporated in the minutes of the Auxiliary. 

MRS. F. C. Harding 



RESOLUTIONS 



The following resolutions were adopted by the 
Woman's Auxiliary of St. Paul's Church, Clinton, 
at its meeting January 20, 1936. 

The Woman's Auxiliary of St. Paul's Church 
having learned of the entrance of Mrs. Eva Lee 
Butler into life eternal offer the following reso- 
lutions : 

Whereas, Mrs. Eva Lee Butler was a former mem- 
ber of the Woman's Auxiliary and all her life a 
loyal member of St. Paul's Church, and 

Whereas, she contributed in a useful way of her 
time and means to the various activities sponsored 
bv the Auxiliary and the Church, and 



MARCH, 1936 



Jo 



Whereas, as an unselfish hostess she made a homo 
for the Rector of the Parish and visiting Clergymen, 
and 

Whereas her character expressed love and charity 
especially for those in need. 

Therefore he it Resolved, That the Woman's Aux- 
iliary of St. Paul's Church, Clinton, express its deep 
gratitude for the life of Mrs. Butler, its deep sense 
of loss by her removal from our midst, love and sym- 
pathy for her family and all who are bereft by her 
going. 

Be it further Resolved, That a copy of these reso- 
lutions be sent to the family of Mrs. Butler, to the 
Newspaper of the town of Clinton, to The Mission- 
Herald, and that they be included in the minutes of 
this meeting. 

MRS. H. I. MORRIS 
MRS. W. H. HERRING 
MRS. WALLACE A. SMITH 



HIGH AND LOW 



[f I were a high Churchman, there are certain defi- 
nite things I would be compelled to do because of the 
things I claimed to stand for. I would worship in the 
church at least once each Sunday. I would pray 
regularly daily. I would serve society to make it 
more Christ like. I would support my Church. I 
would read the Bible daily. I would be a Disciple 
and turn — follow — learn — pray- -serve — worship- — 
share. 

If I were a low Churchman, there are certain defi- 
nite things T would be compelled to do because of the 
things I claimed to stand for. I would worship in 
the church at least once each Sunday. I would pray 
regularly daily. I would read the Bible daily. I 
would serve society to make it more Christ-like. I 
would support my Church. I would be a Disciple 
and turn— follow — learn — pray — serve — worship — 
share. — Rev. Taylor Willis. Living Church. 



STATEMENT OF THE AMOUNTS PAIIJ BY THE PARISHES AND MISSIONS FOR DIOCESAN AND GENERAL 

CHURCH WORK, JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1930. 



Parishes 

Atkinson, St. Thomas' 

Beaufort, St. Paul's 

Clinton, St. Paul's 

Fayetteville, St John's 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 

Hope Mil's, Christ Church 

Kinston, St. Mary's 

New Bern, Chr st Church 

Red Springs, St. Stephen's 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' 

Southport, St. Philip's 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd... 

Wilmington. St. James' 

W'i mington. St. John's 

Wilmington, St. Paul's 

Organized M'ssions 

Burgaw, St. Mary's 

Faison, St. Gabriel's 



Aurora, Holy Cross 

Ayden, St. James' 

Bath, St. Thomas' 

Belhaven, St James' 

Bonnerton, St. John's 

Chocowinity, Trinity 

Columbia, St. Andrew's 

Creswell, St. Davids 

Edenton, St. Paul's 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church. 

Farmville, Emmanuel 

Gatesville, St. Mary's 

Greenv l'e, St. Paul's 

Grifton, St. John's. 

Hamilton, St. Martin's 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 

Jessama, Zion 

Lake Banding, St. George's... 

Plymouth, Grace Church 

Roper, St. Luke's 

Wa-'hington, St. Peter's 

Williamslon, Advent 



CONVOCATION OF WILMINGTON 



Expec- 


Paid to 


tations 


Mar. 11 


10.00 




31fi 15 




110.00 




1,600.00 


212.04 


860.40 


103.50 


60.00 




1,000.00 


.'5.00 


1,624.20 


122.35 


75.00 


20.00 


200.00 




169.60 


20.70 


375.00 




8,280.00 


488.43 


1,800.00 


."50.56 


1,200.00 


157.03 


35.00 


3.36 


23 00 




CONVOCATIO 


250.00 




3U0 00 




35.00 




250.00 


62.50 


100.00 


5.00 


100.00 




200.00 




250.00 




1,488.98 




1,008.76 


91.19 


238.20 


25.00 


100.00 




1,356.20 


10 4.59 


200.00 




75.00 




317.20 




100.00 




200.00 




150.00 




65.00 


1.60 


1,500.00 


250.00 


100.00 


25.00 



I.urnberton, Trinity 

North West, All Soul's 

Pikeville, St. George's 

Trentnn, Grace Church 

Vnnceboro, St. Paul's 

Whiteville, Grace Church . 
Wr'ghtsville, St. Andrew's. 



Unorganized Missions 

Jasper, St. Thomas' 

Pollocksville, Mission 

Wi'mington, Delgado Mission. 

Paroch'al Missions 

Cnmpbel'ton, St. Philip's ... 
Tolar-Hart, Good Shepherd . 



Total. 



W ndsor, St. Thomas' 

Winton, St. John's 

Wondville, Grace Church. 



Organized M'ssions 

.•' hoskie, St. Thomas' 

Fairfield. All Saints' 

Murfrec sboro, St. Barnabas' 

Roxobel, St. Mark's 

Sladesvillc, St. John's 

Snow Hill, St. Barnabas'.. . 

Sunbury, St. Peter's 

Swan Quarter, Calvary ... 
Winterville, st. Luke's . . . 
Yeatesville, St. Matthew's.. 



Unorganized Missions 

Avoca, Holy Innocents'.... 
Camden, St. Joseph's 



Total. 



CONVOCATION OF COLORED CHURCH WORKERS 



Parishes 

Fayetteville, St. Joseph's. 
New Bern, St. Cyprian's... 
Wilmington, St. Mark's... 



Organized M'ssions 

Belhaven, St Mary's 

Edenton, St. John -Evangelist . 

Elizabeth City, St. Philip's 

Goldsboro. St. Andrew's ,. 

Winston, St. Augustine's 

Washington, St. Paul's 



243.60 
362.00 
140.00 



100.00 

110.00 

23 00 

65.00 

80 on 

120.00 



Unorganized Missions 

Aurora, St. Jude's 

Beaufort, St. Clement's 

G-eenville, St. Andrew's 

Haddock's X Roads, St. Stephen's 

Roper, St. Ann's 

Wilmington, "Brooklyn" Mission 
Wrightsville, St. Augustine's... 



Expec- 


Paid to 


tations 


Mar. 11 


175 00 


28.00 


10.00 




20.00 




15.00 




30.00 




100.00 


1 


25.00 


, a 


20.00 


: , <-. 


20.00 




15.00 




10.00 




75.00 


l.i2 


18,253.35 


$ 1,488.29 


225.00 


3 2 08 


80.00 


4.30 


150.00 


2.10 


50.00 




10.00 




30.00 




92.00 


30.00 


10.00 




100.00 




46.35 


5.50 


20.00 




125.00 


30.00 


20.00 




50.00 




10.00 





$ 9,402.69 



Total 

Gnrnd Total. 



369. 45 



36.00 




40.00 


2.25 


30.00 


5.C9 


35.00 




25.00 


. 


IS. 00 




18.00 




$ 1,445.60 


$ 7.25 


$29,101.04 


$ 2,163.00 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD 



VIRGINIA EPISCOPAL 
SCHOOL 

LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 

Prepares boys for College and University. Splen- 
did environment and excellent corps of teachers. 
High standard in scholarship and athletics. Healthy 
and beautiful location in the mountains of Virginia. 
Charges exceptionally low. For catalog apply to: 

REV. OSCAR deWOLF RANDOLPH 

RECTOR 



McCONNELL & CAUSEY 

FOR SERVICE 

Good-Year Tires Exide Batteries 

Quaker State Lubrication 

Telephone 88 12th & Market Sts. 

Wilmington, N. C. 



Form of Bequest 



I hereby, give, devise, and bequeath to 
the Trustees of the Protestant Episcopal 



Church in the Diocese of East Carolina. 



COMMUNION BEEAD 
IN SHEETS OR WAFERS. MONTHLY 
SUPPLIES ARL BEST. Address Mrs. T. T. 
Walsh, WalterborOj South Carolina. 



i 



to be held by them in trust for. 



ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Conducted for Negro Youth under the auspices of the Epis- 
copal Church. 

A four year accredited College Course is offered, leading to 
degrees of B. A. and B. S., including Pre-Medical work and 
Teacher Training for State High School Teachers' certificates. 

A College Preparatory Department, Training School for Nurses 
and School for Religious and Social Workers are connected with 
the College. 

Thorough training, healthy environment. Christian influences. 
For Catalog and information write — 

The Registrar 
ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE, RALEIGH, N. C. 



i_.,.: 



PREVENT COLDS 



USE 



Flurene 



NOSE 
DROPS 



AND 



Flurene 



VAPOR 
SALVE 



Made in East Carolina — Used Everywhere 



*._.„_„, 



4-PLY CROCHET YARN 
50c PER POUND 

WRITE US FOR SPECIAL CLUB 
RATES IN 50-LB. LOTS 

TOLAR, HART & HOLT MILLS 

FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 






— «— + 



i I 
I I 



Meares Insurance Agency 

815 Murehison Building 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 
JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



j An Episcopal School for girls — Have your daughter 
I receive her education in a church school. 

Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, B. S., 
Principal 

Saint Mary's offers 4 years' High School and 2 
years' College work all fully accredited by the South- 
ern Association. Also courses in Music, Art, Ex- 
pression, Home Economics, and Business. 

20-Acre Campus. Gym and Field Sports. Tennis.- 
Indoor Tiled Swimming Pool. Horseback 
R'dmg. Golf 

A. W. TUCKER, Business Manager. 






CfiZttoX 



Ap 25 '36 

Jam. 37 

Library, Tj. IT. c. 

Chapel Hill, K. G, 



U jy q 



VOLUME L 



arije 

tSStDtl 

Jrralt 





TLf t- jpnttljat- §tnrt tfjsay- comr !RfU22:t7 



MEETING OF 

ANNUAL 
CONVENTION 

The fifty -third Annual Convention 
of the Diocese of East Carolina will 
be held in St. Paul's Church, Eden 
ton, May 13, 14, 1936. 



APRIL, 1936 






THE MISSION HERALD 



>3C&C833C&C833C^^ 



CAMP LEACH 



The Time of the Camps is as Follows: 

Senior Young People's Camp (Ages 15 to 24) June 15-June 28 
Junior Camp for Boys (Ages 12 to 15) June 28-July 12 

Junior Camp for Girls (Ages 12 to 15) July 12-July 26 

Midget Boys' and Girls' Camp (Ages 9 to 12) July 26-Aug. 2 

Directors: 

Senior Camp, The Rev. George S. Gresham 

Junior Boys' Gamp, The Rev. George S. Gresham 

Junior Girls' Camp, Miss Maxine Westphall 

Midget Camp, Rev. James Beckwith 

Bishop Darst will be Chaplain of the Senior Camp 



ft 



SOME OF THE TEACHERS 
WILL BE: 

TITO REV. W. R. NOE 

THE REV. ALEXANDER MILLER 

REV. EDWARD MOSELY 

REV. JOHN ERWTN 

MISS ANNIE MORTON STOUT 

REV. JAMES BECKWITH 



SOME OF THE STAFF OF THE 
SENIOR CAMP WILL BE: 

J. WESTON HODOES 
REV. JOHN HARDY 
REV. LAWRENCE PENWICK 
MRS. ELIZABETH PERKTNS 
MISS BESSIE BROWN 
MISS ESTELLE OREEN 
MISS ELIZABETH ANDREWS 
MRS. LAWRENCE PENWICK 
MR JOHN BECKWITH 
MISS SUE MARTIN CAPEHART 



C^X^3CH3t^C^^^ 



The Mission Herald 



VOLUME L 



WILMINGTON, N. C, APRIL, 1936 



NUMBER 4 



BISHOP'S LETTER 



In my letter in the March issue of the Mission 
Herald I gave an account of my activities up to 
and including the second Sunday in March. 

On Thursday evening, the twelfth, I preached 
and confirmed one person presented by Mr. Ashley 
T. St.Amand in the Delgado Mission. This inter- 
esting mission continues to go forward helpfully 
and hopefully under the fine, consecrated leadership 
of Mr. and Mrs. St.Amand. 

From Sunday, March fifteenth, through Sunday 
the twenty-second, I conducted a mission in Christ 
Church, Roanoke, Va. Splendid preparation for 
the mission had been made by the Rector, Rev. John 
F. W. Feild and, as a result of that careful prepa- 
ration, the mission was one of the best in interest 
and attendance that I have ever known. In addi- 
tion to the two services in the church each day, I 
had the privilege of visiting and making addresses 
in numerous local schools and colleges. 

On Wednesday evening, the twenty-fifth, I 
preached at a special Lenten service in St. John's, 
Fayetteville. 

On the morning of the twenty-sixth. I made an 
address at the Cumberland County Sunday Schooi 
Convention in Fayetteville. 

On the evening of the twenty-sixth I preached 
and confirmed four persons presented by the Rev. 
Howard Allisrood in Christ Church, Hope Mills. 

On Saturday morning, the twenty-eighth, I at- 
tended a meeting' of the Executive Committee of 
the Diocesan Y. P. S. I . in St. Paul's Parish House, 
Greenville. 

On the evening of the same day. I had the great 
privilege of being the "Guest of Honor" at the 
annual "Bishop's Supper" in Friendly Hall. Green- 
ville, and. as usual, I enjoyed being with the fine 
group of E. C. T. C. students who are doing un- 
lisually fine work this year under the leadership of 
Miss Elizabeth Andrews. 

On Sunday morning, the twenty-ninth, I preached 
in St. Paul's Church, Oreenville, and at night I 
preached and confirmed one person, presented by 
the Rev. Worth Wicker., in St. Andrew's Church, 
Greenville. 

The thirtieth and thirty-first were spent in rny 
old parish, St. Paul's. Newport News, Va., where I 
spoke to the men of the parish on Monday night 



and preached at a special Lenten service on Tuesday 
night. 

On Palm Sunday, April fifth, I preached, con- 
firmed nineteen persons presented by the Rev. Wm. 
H. Milton, D. I), and celebrated Holy Communion 
in St. James' Church, Wilmington. 

From Monday the sixth through Good Friday, 
I preached at the noonday services in the Garrick 
Theatre, Philadelphia to congregations numbering 
from seven hundred to one thousand each day. 

On Easter Day I assisted Dr. Milton in the early 
Communion service at St. James', Wilmington, and 
at eleven o'clock I preached, confirmed five persons 
presented by the Rev. E. C. McConnell and cele- 
brated Uoly Communion in the Church of the Good 
Shepherd, Wilmington. This was the twenty-first 
consecutive Easter that I have had the privilege of 
preaching and confirming in the Church of the Good 
Shepherd. 

This letter is being written on April 13th and in 
just one month from today the Fifty-third Annual 
Convention will be held in St. Paul's Church, Eden- 
ton. I trust that prayers for the Convention will 
be offered in all of our churches on the remaining 
Sundays and that every parish and mission will be 
represented at the Convention by one or more dele- 
gates. 

We are preparing an interesting program which 
will include a celebration of the two-hundredth an- 
niversary of the present St. Paul's Church. Edenton, 
and we hope and believe it will prove to be a great 
Convention. 

With loving greetings to our diocesan family, I 
am, 

Faithfully and affectionately, 

Your friend and Bishop, 

THOMAS C. DARST. 



ST. PAUL'S, GREENVILLE 



The Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst made his annual 
visit to St. Paul's parish, Greenville, Passion Sun- 
day. He preached to a large congregation at the 
eleven o'clock service. 

It is quite unnecessary to say the people always 
enjoy hearing- Bishop Darst preach. The fact that 
all the extra chairs in the parish house have to be 
brought into the Church to seat the people is ample 

proof. 

Department of Publicity 
of the Woman's Auxiliarv. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



BUDGET CUTS MET BY CHURCHWIDE EFFORT 



Hope That Attempt Will be Made to Increase Giving 
for Missions Beyond Emergency Schedule 

New York — "Disaster averted" was the message 
from Church Missions House at the deadline. March 
•Msti," cabled or telegraphed to missionary bishops 
everywhere to indicate that loyal, sacrificial effort 
had averted the missionary crisis for 1936. In- 
stantly there came from a score of sources reverent 
messages of thanksgiving that disaster to our work 
at home and abroad would not befall. 

The National Council at the close of 1935 faced 
a deficit of $250,000, reduced by the most earnest 
effort to $211,000 when the National Council met 
in February; further adjusted by that body to repre- 
sent an inescapable gap of $127,100 which became 
the basis of a crisis appeal and of one of the most 
heartening experiences in the record of our miss'on- 
ary leadership. It will be remembered that in every 
possible way the Church had been canvassed for 
support in parish, diocese, and for missions and that 
despite the most loyal effort everywhere there were 
discouraging signs of inability to give further to 
meet the needs of the Church. 

The National Council, following the advice of a 
distinguished committee, headed by Bishop Stewart 
of 'Chicago, decided on one more appeal and set 
March 31st as a deadline when further gifts might 
actually balance the Budget. Immediate effort was 
begun to inform the Church. There was instant 
response. It came from bishops everywhere, from 
the Woman's Auxil'ary and other organized groups 
and literally from thousands of individuals sending 
gifts that by the deadline amounted to well beyond 
a hundred thousand dollars in cash and pledges 
with many units still to be heard from so that it is 
possible to announce success of the effort. 

$60,000 in Pledges 

Approximately $60,000 of the amounts which have 
made up the necessary total is in the form of pledges. 
It is evident that many weeks, indeed months, of 
effort are still ahead of dioceses, and other units 
which made these pledges and that the final general 
thanksgiving and assnred rescue of our missionary 
work from disaster can only come when this effort: 
is ended and these pledges have been paid. 

It was termed impossible this early to give even 
an approximation of a detailed financial statement. 
The staff of the Finance Department at Church 
Missions House, beginning with the treasurer, Dr. 
Franklin, and the assistant treasnrer. Mr. Whitney, 
have faced an overwhelming task involving day and 



night work and reached the final day with acknow- 
ledgements complete but with analysis accounting 
and final tabulation, still confronting them. De- 
tailed financial reports will be reserved for the 
National Council meeting at Church Missions House, 
April 28th, 29th, and 30th. For the present, how- 
ever, the fact is assured that the Council's faith 
in the missionary loyalty of the Church was fully 
justified. 

Battle Ahead 

With the averting of the crisis of 1936, however, 
it was pointed out that the raising of a compara- 
tively small deficit in a given year represents only 
a skirmish in a battle that must now be fought. The 
National Council aided by the Church has merely 
realized what General Convention at Atlantic 'City 
called "The Emergency Schedule" of $2,313,115. 
The same General Convention declared that a Bud- 
get of $2,700,000 which it adopted as the real mini- 
mum was itself less than the sum actually needed. 

A problem confronting the National Council in 
the midst of rejoicing with respect to 1936 will be 
to hold what gains have been made and lay foun- 
dations for the immediate rehabilitation of our mis- 
sionary work upon the basis of the x\tlantic City 
Budget 



E.4ST CAROLINA RESPONDS TO APPEAL 07 
GENERAL CHURCH 

The following contributions were sent to the 
Treasurer of the Diocese to be forwarded to ti o 
National Treasurer: 
Rev. J. A. Vache, Greensboro, formerly r of this 

Diocese $ 5.00 

Mr. E. K. Bishop, Christ Church, New Bern 25.00 
Woman's Auxiliary) St. Paul's, Greenville 5.00 

St. Peter's Par's!), AYashin-ton 25.00 

St. Paul's Parish. Wilmington 2 00 

Woman's Auxiliary; St. Paul's, Beaufort 10 03 

Woman's Auxiliary, Ascension Chapel, Wilming- 
ton 1.00 

Holy Trinity Parish, Hertford 25 00 

Grace Church Parish. Woodvihe 1.00 

St. Luke's. Winterville '___ 20 00 

St. John's Parish, Favetteville 10.00 

Woman's Auxiliary. St. John's, Wilmington 32.00 

St Stephen's Parish, Goldsboro 25.00 

Mrs. Win. H. Lon<? and daughters, Greenville 20.00 
St. Mary's Auxiliary. St. Paul's Greenville 5.00 
St. Hilda's Auxiliary, St. John's Wilmington 1.00 

St. Jude's, Aurora 2.05 

St. Paul's. Washington .4.00 

Woman's Auxiliary, St. Mary's, Kinston 50 00 

St. John's Parish. Wilmington 36 00 



APRIL. 1936 



Woman's Auxiliary, St. George's., Lake Land- 
ing 2.00 

St. Andrew's. Columbia 1.10 

Woman's Auxiliary, St. Andrew's, Columbia 2.00 
Woman's Auxiliary, Christ Church. New Bern 15.00 
Sent direct to National Treasurer to March 31st, 
including $400.00 from St. James' Parish, 
Wilmington 533.00 



Total $857.15 



LETTER FROM THE NATIONAL COUNCIL 



April 7th, 1936 
The Rev. Walter Noe, 
507 Southern Building, 
Wilmington, North Carolina. 
Dear Mr. Noe: 

We are enclosing 'individual receipts covering the 
$268.05 received in your letter of April 2nd. We 
have made the receipts in this form thinking that it 
might be helpful to you in the acknowledgement to 
the individuals and organizations. We are asking 
that you convey to each of them our sincere appre- 
ciation for their support and for their share in mak- 
ing possible the saving of our missionary work. 

The volume of detail involved in this appeal has 
been more than our small staff has been able to keep 
up to date and we hope within a few days to be 
able to send you a list of all the contributions re- 
ceived from the Diocese of East Carolina. 

According to the memorandum I have before me, 
we have received $533 at the close of business on 
March 31st, 

Sincerely yours, 

J. E.WHITNEY, 

Assistant Treasurer 



THE FIFTY-THIRD ANNUAL CONVENTION 

OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA, 

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, EDENTON 

PROGRAM 



Tuesday, May 12th 

8:00 P. M. — Pre-Convention meeting with ad- 
dresses by Mr. George B. Elliott, Mr. 
Frederick A. Turner and a represen- 
tative of the Young People's Service 
League of the Diocese. 

9 :00 P. M.— Meeting of the Executive Council. 



Wednesday, May 13th 
7:30 A. M. — Celebration of the Holy Communion, 

St, Paul's Church. 

Celebration of the Holy Communion, 

Church of St. John-the-Evangelist. 
10:00 A. M. — Organization of the Convention. 
10:30 A. M.- -Annual Address of the Bishop. 
1 00 P. M.— Luncheon. 
2:00 P. M. — Business Session. (See Rules of Order) 

Committee on Elections. 

Committee on New Parishes. 

Standing Committee. 

Examining Chaplains. 

Treasurer. 

Department of Finance. 

Committee on Canons. 

Committee on Unfinished Business. 

Committee on the State of the Church. 

Trustees of the Diocese. 

Trustees of the University of the 
South. 

Other Special Committees. 

Other reports, including reports of St. 
Mary's School. Thompson Orphan- 
age, and Chaplain at University of 
North Carolina. 

Motions and Resolutions. 
8:00 P. M — Short service and address by Rev. 
Carleton Barnwell, D. D., Rector of 
St. Paul's Church, Lynchburg, Va., 
on "The Forward Movement." 



7:30 A. M. 
10:00 A. M, 
1 1 :00 A. M.- 



2:00 P. M.- 



Thursday, May 14th 

-Celebration of the Holy Communion. 

-Business Session. 

-Celebration of the two hundredth An- 
niversary of the present St. Paul's 
Church, Edenton. 

-Business Session or meeting of the 
Executive Council. 



Among the important things to come before the 
Convention are : 

1. The Annual Address of the Bishop. 2. Repot t 
of the Anniversary Committee on the results of the 
work for the first year. 3. The proposed change in 
Allele 4. section 3 of the Constitution. This is the 
Order of the Day for the first day of the Convention 
by action of the Convention of 1935. 4. Report of 
the Committee on The Laymen's League of the Epis- 
copal Church. This Committee was appointed at 
the 1935 Convention. 5. Report of Finance Depart- 
ment. 6. Report of Executive Council. 7. Recom- 
mendation of the Insurance Committee that all 
Church property in the Diocese be protected by 
insurance. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



LETTER FROM PRESIDENT OF WOMAN'S 

AUXILIARY OF THE CONVOCATION 

OF WILMINGTON 



The joyous news from the National Church that 
the necessary total of $127,100 to prevent further 
cuts in the National Church work seems assured, 
will not only relieve the anxiety of our Missionary 
Bishops and their workers in the fields, but will 
bring much happiness to them and to us during 
this glorious Eastertide. May this victorious news 
inspire us on to even greater effort in helping to 
bring Christ's Kingdom on Earth. 

The Get-Together meetings in the five Districts 
in the Convocation will be held the latter part of 
April and the first of May in the following places : 

District No. 1— St. Paul's, Beaufort, N. C, April 
22nd. Mrs. Frank N. Challen. New Bern, N. C. 
Chairman. 

District No. 2— St. Barnabas', Snow Hill, N. C, 
April 29th. Miss Mayme Whitfield, Route 4, Kin- 
ston, N. ft Chairman. 

District No. lO^St. Stephen's, C.oldsboro, N. C, 
April 23rd. Mrs. P. B. Johnson, Clinton, N. C. 
Chairman. 

District No. 11 — Trinity. Lumberton. N. ft, May 
6th. Mrs. S. L. Smith, Whiteville, N. ft, Chairman. 

District No. 12 — To be announced later. Mrs. 
William O. James, Wilmington, N. C. Chairman. 

These meetings will begin with a Celebration of 
the Holy Communion at 10:00 o'clock A. M. Fur- 
ther information concerning these meetings will be 
sent to you by the District Chairman. Let us make 
every effort to have a large representation from each 
Parish Branch to attend these District Meetings. 

Fellowship is the Greatest asset of our Auxiliary 
work, and a day spent together in study and closer 
fellowship, will greatly stimulate and strengthen us 
in our Master's service. 

The Good Friday Offering is celebrating its cen- 
tennial this year. On April 3. 1836, a hundred 
years ago, the Rev. Horatio Southgate was sent out 
to the Near East as a missionary of the Episcopal 
Church. Today the work in Jerusalem is being 
splendidly carried on by Canon Charles T. Bridge- 
man. The flood Friday Offering is the way in 
which we can express our approval of the very fine 
work that is being done. 

There is a fine article in the ''March" Spirit 
of Missions, by the Rev. C. T. Bridgeman. in which 
he describes the various phases of his work, and 
how it depends on the Cood Friday Offering. It 
would be splendid to have each Parish Branch to 
have a share in this most important work. 

I am hoping to have the pleasure of seeing many 
of you at our District Meetings. May the Blessed 



Eastertide bring joy and happiness to each one of 
us, and renewed courage and a larger vision in the 
Master's service. 
With love, I am 

Faithfully yours, 

ANN P. BECKWITH 
President of the Convocation of Wilmington 



SPIRITS 



The Woman's Auxiliary of St. Paul's Church, 
Vanceboro was reorganized the first of January 
with ten members, Mrs. Latt Purser, president. 
March 11. the President of the Woman's Auxiliary 
in the diocese, Mrs. Fred L. Outland, met with the 
auxiliary again. By that time the membership was 
twenty. 

Speakino- of spirits, there must be several kinds 
of spirits in that auxiliary, namely, the spirit of 
fellowship, the spirit of cooperation, the spirit of 
charity, and partieidary that spirit of, '"Co ye out 
and get another member." The people in the dio- 
cese are justly proud of the Woman's Auxiliary at 
Vanceboro, and will watch with keen interest the 
way the membership and interest are doubling. 

And while we arc writing about the church at 
Vanceboro. one might ask this question, "Did you 
know the church has one of the best Y. P. S. Leagues 
in the diocese?" It has. 

Department of Publicity 
of the Woman's Auxiliary. 



BISHOP'S APPOINTMENTS FOR MAY 



May 
May 
May 

May 
May 
Mav 



3—; 



^0- 

12- 
13-1 
17- 



May 24- 



May 
Mav 



25- 
31- 



St. John's, Fayette viille, at 11 :00 A. M. 

St. Joseph's. Fayettevillc, 8:00 P. M. 
-Annual Pilgrimage to St. Philip's, Bruns- 
wick. P. M. 
-Christ Church, New Bern, 11:00 A. M. 

District Meeting Y. P. S. L.. St. Paul's, 
Vanceboro, 2 :00 P. M. 

St. ( Vprian's Church, New Bern, 8 :00 P. M. 
-Pre-Convention meeting at St. Paul's, 

Edenton, 8 :00 P. M. 
4 — Diocesan Convention, St. Paul's Eden- 
ton. 
-Holy Innocents', Lenoir Comity, 11:00 
A. M. . 

St. Mark's Church, Wilmington, 8 :00 P. M. 
-St. Mary's, Gatesville. 

St. Peter's, Snnbury. 

St. John's, Winton. 
-St. Barnabas' Murfreesboro. 

St. Thomas', Ahoskie. 
-St. Thomas', Atkinson. 11 :00 A. M. 

St Phdip's, Southport 8:00 P M. 






HtPRffi. 1936 



HE IS RISEN 



1o ask thenlselves the question that if they do leave 
a Risen Lord, "to whom shall we go?" 

Editorial, Southern Churchman 



There is an old joke that after Easter the Epis- 
copalians lapse into paganism until the following 
winter. Like all humor there is a truth in this 
joke. There has always been a tendency to feel 
that Easter was the climax and end of real activity 
in the Church. 

Maybe it is the Forward Movement emphasis, or 
maybe we have lately had a little thinking on the 
subject, but The Oreat Fifty Days is now being 
emphasized and we have learned that When we come 
to a realization that Our Lord is Risen indeed, 
Easter;, instead of being the end of everything, 
becomes actually the beginning of real religious 
life. 

We ne^d the realization of The Risen Lord today. 
There have been fine thoughts expressed during the 
past lew years about the teaching and the ethics of 
Our Lord. Revelation has been subjected to com- 
plete indifference, and few sermons or lessons have 
been devoted to what the Archbishop of York calls 
the "centrality of Christ". When we realize that 
even many of the devoted followers have been upset 
and doubtful about the Living Lord, we can see 
where many of our people have become discouraged 
anrl wondered if truth could be found in religion. 

The Mary who went weeping to the tomb was- 
looking for a dead Christ. She could not recognize 
The Lord when she saw Him and mistook Him for 
someone else. That has been the attitude of many 
of our Church people in the present time. We have 
looked for a dead Christ. Often He has been a 
Christ that we had buried in our tradition and He 
was not recognizable in a modern world of many 
complex problems. 

The emphasis on the Creat Fifty Days brings us 
to the Spirit of Pentecost and reveals The Living 
Lord Who is still Lord of all our world. He is 
always ahead of us on the road of civilization 
beckoning us to follow Him to daring adventure 
in the Spirit of The Living Cod. but we have failed 
because we have left Him without the devotion and 
service and sharing that is needed to recognize Him 
as Living. 

Consequently men and women are following all 
types of leadership with all kinds of promises. Soc- 
ial justice, security, peace and happiness cannot 
come unless the Spirit of Life is present. Only 
a Risen Lord promises to be with us to the end of 
the world, and only those who know The Christ as 
a Living Lord can bring about the changes that a 
suffering world needs today. 

Is it not time we used more common sense about 
our religion, and is it not time for men and women 



BISHOP McKIM 



Scarcely had the joyous news of the meeting of 
the missionary deficit been received by the Church 
than it was followed by the sad news of the death 
of Bishop McKim, one of the Church's oldest and 
most beloved missionary veterans. Full of years 
and of honors. Bishop McKim entered into the life 
beyond just as the Church that he loved so well 
and served so faithfully was preparing to com- 
memorate the last week of the earthly life of Our 
Lord. Should there really be any sadness at the 
peaceful death of a great Churchman at such an 
appropriate time, especially when, with St. Paul, 
he might well cry triumphantly, "I have fought 
the good fight. 1 have kept the faith"? 

That Bishop McKim did fight a good fight and 
that he kept the faith no one can question. Never 
from his lips did one hear the watery heresy that 
one religion is as good as another and that the 
chief end of foreign missions is the helping of our 
Oriental brother to realize the best that is in his 
own tradition and culture. To Bishop McKim, as 
to every notable figure in the long line of mission- 
ary saints of all ages, even to the Apostles them- 
selves. Christianity was the unique good news of 
1 1 e incarnate-, crucified, risen Lord by whose name 
alone man might be saved. 

We have not lightly referred to Bishop McKim 
as a great missionary. We earnestly believe that 
his name >'s worthy to be ranked with those of such 
famous missionaries as St. Augustine and St. Boni- 
face, St Ansgarius and St. Francis Xavier — in our 
own communion, Bishop Patteson and Bishop Kem- 
per. All of these went into new and dangerous 
lands and preached the Cospel of the Risen Christ 
boldly, fearlessly, and with fervent zeal. Bishop 
McKim will find himself at home in the heavenly 
company of such immortals. 

Did we write that the news of Bishop McKim 's 
d^ath brought sadness to the Church? We were 
wrong. Not sadness but joy is ours as we record 
the nassing of this lnval servant of Christ, for he 
is indeed not dead but alive unto Ood through 
-lesus Christ Our Lord. As Ave say the words of 
the plorious Easter collect, "Almighty Cod, who 
through thine only begotten Son. Jesus Christ, hath 
overcome death and opened unto us the gate of 
everlasting Life . . ." let us remember with thanks- 
Hving the soul of John McKim and pray for Cod's 
blessmg upon him as he, having passed through 
death, enters the gate of that same Everlasting Life. 

Editorial, Living Church 



THE MISSION HERALD 



The Mission Herald 

ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 
Published Monthly except July and August at 

507 Southern Building 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF ~ ~~ 

Editor 
REV. WALTER R. NOE 
Wilmington, N. C. 
Contributing Editors 
RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. 

MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 
Advertising rates furnished on application. 



D. 



Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to receive 
their papers, should promptly notify the Business Man- 
ager, giving when necessary, both the old and new ad- 
dress. 

THE PROPOSED CHANGE IN THE 
CONSTITUTION 



At the meeting of the Convention in 1933, the 
following resolution of the Committee on Canons 
was passed on its first reading: 

Resolved, That Article TV. Section 3. of the Con- 
stitution, he amended by striking out the word male 
and the following words relating to the possible 
election of a delegate from another parish, and by 
adding the words "one of whom may be a woman". 

The amended section would then read as follows: 

"Each regularly organized parish within the Dio- 
cese shall be entitled to be represented by one or 
more Lay Delegates, not exceeding four, one of whom 
may be a woman, chosen by the Vestry from the 
communicants of the Parish. 

"No person, Clerical or Lay, under Ecclesiastical 
Censure, declared by a competent tribunal, shall be 
admissible to a :-eat in the Convention." 

This resolution was given consideration in the 
Conventions of 1934 and 1935. and has been made 
the order of the day for the first day of the Con- 
vention of 1936 wh'ch will meet in St. Paul's Church, 
Edenton May 13th and 14th. 

On account of this and other important matters 
to come before the Convention, every parish and 
mission should be represented. 



THE BISHOP'S MEMORIAL ANNIVERSARY 
FUND 



The Committee on the Bishop's Memorial Anni- 
versary bund will make a report to the Convention. 



Members of the Committee, who were requested 
to secure pledges for the four year period, have 
reported that those who have been seen have wil- 
lingly and gladly made their pledges. 

On account of weather and other conditions, many 
of the people have not been seen, and it is very im- 
portant for this to be done before the meeting of 
the Convention. 

For the Committee to be able to report to the 
Convention that the whole amount has been pledged 
a number of new pledges must be secured at once. 

We are confident that the people of the diocese 
will co-operate with the members of the Committee 
in every way. 






ANNIVERSARY NUMBER 



At the request of a number of friends, we have 
decided to make the May issue of the Mission Herald, 
the Anniversarv number. 



HAS ENJOYED THE MISSION HERALD 
FOR FIFTY YEARS 



One of our subscribers, Mrs. W. M. Butt of St. 
John's, Bonnerton, has written to the Mission Herald 
as follows : 

"I am writing to say that I am one who has en- 
joyed the Mission Herald in this home for fifty 
years. My mother, Mrs. M. V. Robason, was a 
subscriber at that time, and it has been a constant 
welcome visitor ever since. Our Church paper, be- 
fore the Mission Herald, was the Church Messenger, 
which also came to my home. I hope the Mission 
Herald may enjoy its fiftieth Anniversary." 



THERE MUST BE OTHERS WHO TOOK OR SAW 
THE MISSION HERALD FIFTY YEARS AGO 



If there are others in the Diocese or elsewhere 
who took or saw the Mission Herald, when it was 
first published we would like for them to write us 
before the publication of the Anniversary number. 



NOTICE 

A number of poets and lovers of poetry of the 
Episcopal Church are planning an Episcopal poetry 
society and a magazine to voice the same. A move- 
ment with the approbation of many of the reverend 
clergy. Will all who are interested in the move- 
ment write to the undersigned for particulars? 
JAMES GABELLE, 

76 Heights Road, 
Ridgewood, N. J. j 






APRIL, 1936 



RECTOR HONORED FOR LONG SERVICE 



ST. GEORGE'S CHURCH, LAKE LANDING 



Rev. Alex C. D. Noe Will Leave Church After Having- 
Served As Rector for Eight Years. 



A union service was held at St. James' Episcopal 
Church, Ayden, Sunday night, in appreciation of the 
eiaht years service of Rev. Alex C. D. Noe, rector of 
the church, who will leave this charge April first. 

Mr and Mrs. Noe have been active in church and 
community work here and the community took part 
in the farewell service. The speakers were : Rev. T. 
A. Sykes, pastor of the Methodist Church and Presi- 
dent of the Ministerial Association ; Rev. W. H. Bran- 
son, pastor of the Christian Church ; Rev. R. F. Pitt- 
man, pastor of the Free Will Baptist Church and 
Mayor J. B. Eure. All commended the departing 
minister and his family for the fine service rendered 
and for their cooperation in all worthwhile church 
and community programs. Mr. Noe responded by 
thanking h ; s fellow pastors and the community and 
stating that he and his family had received more from 
the town and its churches, in the way of friendship, 
cooperation and inspiration than could ever be re- 
paid. He commended the town for its splendid 
pastors, its fine organizations and progressive oper- 
ations and its community spirit. 

Rev. E. H. Cannady, pastor of the Baptist Church 
1 ad to be elsewhere for a service and appointed 
W. M. Jenkins, Superintendent of local schools, to 
represent their church. 

For the past eight years Mr. Noe has been Rector 
of St. James' Church, Ayden, St. Luke's. Winter- 
ville. St. Mark's. Griffon, St. John's. Pitt County, 
and Holy Innocents', Lenoir County, and during that 
period many members have been added to the va- 
rious units and in spite of the depression, many 
improvements have been made in the physical pro- 
perties of the churches in the way of repairs, paint 
and general internal and external repairs and beau- 
tification. 

After Apr ; l first Mr. Noe will be rector of St. 
Thomas' Church, Bath, the oldest church in the 
state, where he will assist Bishop Darst in restoring 
the old parish and making it a shrine for the whole 
State. He will also be rector of the churches at 
Zion and Chocowinity, the former a large and pro- 
gressive rural church in a town which was once the 
home of Trinity School and has done much for the 
work of education in the State. — Ayden Dispatch. 



In 1866 the Rev. Samuel Swans Barber (a deacon 
in the Episcopal Church) came to Hyde County and 
began missionary work. For several years he 
preached in school houses or private homes, but 
by his earnest efforts he finally founded St. George's 
Parish, and began to make plans to erect a church. 
Dr. Milton Selby generously contributed money to 
buy the lot. Funds were raised by contributions 
of the members of the Methodist and Baptist Church- 
es which were already established in the county. 

The corner stone was laid October 4, 1874. The 
windows were bought with contributions from nor- 
thern friends. 

Bishop Atkinson was the Bishop of North Caro- 
lina at the time and consecrated St. George's Church. 
It now has windows in memory of Bishops Atkinson, 
Lyman and Strange. Suitable memorials have been 
placed in memory of faithful members who have 
passed on. Repairs have been made from time to 
time whenever needed and at this time the church 
and grounds are in excellent condition. 

Note: The member of St. George's Church who 
wrote this history became a member of the Church 
over fifty years ago. 

Department of Publicity 
of the Woman's Auxiliary. 



THE STEADY SUBSCRIBER 



How dear to our hearts is the steady subscriber, 

Who pays in advance at the birth of each year. 
Who lays down the money and does it quite gladly. 

And easts round the office a halo of cheer. 
He never says : "Stop it : I cannot afford it, 

I'm getting more papers than now I can read." 
But always says: ''Send it; our people all like it — 

In fact, we all think it a help and a need." 
How welcome his check when it reaches our sanctum, 

How it makes our pulse throb; how it makes our 
heart dance. 
We outwardly thank him : we inwardly bless him-- 

The steady subscriber who pays in advance. 

— Source Unknown. 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD 



THE RURAL WORK COMMITTEE APPOINTED 
BY THE DEPARTMENT OF MISSIONS AND 
CHURCH EXTENSION OF THE DIOCESE OF 
EAST CAROLINA HELD ITS FIRST FIFTH 
SUNDAY CONFERENCE AT HOLY INNO- 
CENTS' CHURCH, SEVEN SPRINGS, MARCH 
29, 1936. 



By Rev. James D. Beckwith, Secretary 



At 11 :00 A. M. Morning Prayer was read by 
Rev. John Hardy, member of the Rural Work 
Committee, Rev. Leon Malone, Chairman of the 
Rural Work Committee, Rev. W. R. Noe, Ex- 
ecutive Secretary of the Diocese. Rev. A. C. D. Noe, 
Rector of the Holy Innocents' Chivrch of Seven. 
Springs, and the sermon was preached by Rev. 
James D. Beckwith, a member of the Rural Work 
Committee. 

After the service a very delightful dinner was 
served by the members of Holy Innocents' Church, 
which was enjoyed by everyone present. 

At 2 :00 P. M. the Rural Work Conference assem- 
bled for its evening session, in Holy Innocents' 
Church. Rev. Leon Malone, Chairman of the Rural 
Work Committee, conducted the worship serv'c 3 , 
which consisted of the opening hymn "() Zion Haste, 
Thy Mission I I'igh Fulfilling", followed with the 
creed and prayers. 

Mr. Oscar Hardy, member of the Rural Work Com- 
mittee made the address of welcome, and Rev. Leon 
Malone made response for the Conference. 

Rev. Leon Malone presided over the conference 
as Chairman of the Committee. In his introductory 
remarks he gave the history of the Rural Work Com- 
mittee. In his brief history lie read the findings 
of the Committee at its meeting in December, in 
Washington, N. C. a copy of these findings is incor- 
porated as a part of the minutes of this meeting. 
He further stated that the conference at Seven 
Springs was held for the benefit of the Clergy and 
Laity of the Rural Districts. He wanted everyone 
to feel that it was Iris conference, because the aim 
of the conference is to discuss the rural work in 
the Diocese. 

The subject of this Conference was "Confirma- 
tion". A subject chosen because church statist'ci 
show that there has been a decrease in the number 
of people brought to confirmation in the past year, 
which is direct evidence that something is wrong 
with the church. 

We also plan to have other subjects discussed at 



these Fifth Sunday meetings, such as, Religious 
Education, Christian Social Service, Church Book- 
keeping. Activities of Vestry, Rotation of Clergy, 
and special speakers on rural work, and other sub- 
jects that may arise during the conference. 

The Subject of Confirmation 

1. Recruiting candidates for Confirmation — Rev. 
W. R. Noe. 

Mr. Noe presented the subject as follows : 

(a) Use wisely, good literature. Mr. Noe impressed 
us with vivid illustrations of what we can do by wise 
use of literature. By wisely he meant not forcing 
our literature on others, or giving the extreme liter- 
ature of our Church to candidates. 

(b) Personal service. Mr. Noe said that this is 
the most important method. It is the method used 
by the Clergy, the only difficulty with it is that 
not enough of it is done. If we are to attract people 
to our Church we must attract them to ourselves. 
People are usually attracted to the minister tirst and 
then to his message. If the Clergy and Laity still have 
the conviction that the Church possesses the only sal- 
vation for man, they will sell the Church to others. 

After Mr. Noe's talk, Mr. Malone asked the con- 
ference if they had any questions to ask. Mr. J. Q. 
Beckwith asked Mr. Noe to explain how he brought 
150 people to confirmation in Wilmington. Mr. Noe 
< xplained that the foundation for that work was done 
by a layman. 

2. Training candidates for Confirmation — Rev. 
Harry Jackson. 

Mr. Jackson treated the subject in the following 
manner : 

(a) The Episcopal Church must go to the people, 
rather than making the people come to the Church. 

(b) The Church must train people for confirma- 
tion in its Church School. Under this point he im- 
pressed upon us the importance of laymen teaching 
the Church. 

(c) The Church must teach its comprehensiveness, 
in order that all of her members will be at home in 
any Episcopal Church. The Episcopal Church var- 
ies in ritual and ceremony but is one in spirit. 

(d) The Church must confirm first and teach 
afterwards. Mr. Jackson gave Bishop Maxon of 
Tennessee credit for this point of his discussion. 

After the talk Mr. Malone again asked for ques- 
tions. There being no questions the conference 
turned to the third phase of the subject. 

Z. After Confirmation, What?— Rev. John Hardy. 

Mr. Hardy began his discussion by introducing the 
book "After Confirmation, What?", by Bishop 
Thomas F. Dav ; s, published by Morehouse Publish- 
ing Company, New York City. N. Y., In his intro- 
ductorv remarks Mr, Hardv told the conference 



APRIL, 1936 



11 



that over fotxr thousand communicants had been 
lost after confirmation in the Diocese of East Caro- 
lina. This shows the need for a consideration of 
the subject "After Confirmation". 

(a) We must have a vision of Christ to impart 
to others. This can be done only by personal con- 
tact one with another and deepening our personal 
spiritual life. We must give people something th;;t 
is worth while. 

(b) The Church must be a part of the social life 
of our people. We must let the young people know 
that the Church is interested in their activities, and 
in our social life we must express the warmth of 
friendship and love, which is the real characteristic 
of christian living. 

(c) The Church deals with life. It must show to 
all its members that it is vitally interested in every 
thing they do, its very existence is based on abun- 
'dant life. 

(d) Mr. Hardy from his own experience explained 
how it was possible for members of the Church to 
bring confirmed members back into the Church by 
personal encouragement. 

(e) The Church must give all its members a 
job regardless of how small. A christian discipl o 
in order to live his religion must serve some way 
in the Church. If the members feel that something 
'is depending on them they will do it. If this is 
done the Church will go forward. We have some- 
thing to give the Church as well as the 'Church hav- 
ing' something to give us. 

Mr. Malone asked for any questions in regard to 
"After Confirmation, What?" There being no 
questions, the conference turned to the discussion 
of helpful plans for the rural work in the diocese. 

Mr. Herman Marsh, a layman of Belhaven, pre- 
sented the plan of having a central treasurer for each 
field. His plan would eliminate the minister's wor- 
ries, the method of having a central treasurer would 
be left to each field. The Rev. John Hardy moved 
that this plan be tried in one of the mission fields of 
the diocese. The motion passed. 

Mr. J. Q. Beckwith, of Lumberton. spoke to the 
conference on the subject of Rural Work Adminis- 
tration. In his discussion he brought out the fact 
that the present method must be revised in some 
way. He suggested that the Clergy have a more 
limited area in which to work. The speech of Mr. 
Beckwith has been incorporated in the minutes of 
this conference. 

Rev. Leon Malone asked the conference for a sub- 
ject to discuss at the next Fifth Sunday meeting. 
Rev. W. R. Noe, Executive Secretary of the Diocese, 
suggested that the subject of Mr. Beckwith 's speech 
be the subject for the next Fifth Sunday Conference. 



The Rev. A. C. D. Noe suggested that the subject be 
changed to Rural Work Administration. The sub- 
ject to be referred to the Rural Work Committee. 

The Rev. Leon Malone asked the conference to 
suggest a place for the next Fifth Sunday meeting. 
Rev. A. C. D. Noe invited the conference to meet in 
Bath. The invitation was accepted. 

The conference was then divided into three groups. 
These groups were to discuss the conference. The 
first group was led by Dr. Huske. Rector of St. 
Mary's Church, Kinston. The second group was led 
by Rev. Geo. Cresham, of Goldsboro. The third 
group was led by Rev. A. C D. Noe. 

Mr. Oscar Hardy asked all people present to regis- 
ter before they left the conference. 

The groups departed from the conference to dis- 
cuss their business. After fifteen minutes they 
were asked to return to the Church. 

After calling the meeting to order Mr. E. E. Seay 
of Clinton, N. C, reported the findings of the first 
group. The group decided that more work should 
be done by laymen. Their chief function would 
be to be more friendly and hospitable to strangers. 

Rev. George Gresham reported for the second 
group. The second group agreed with Mr. Jackson 
in toto except they disagreed with Mr. Jackson on 
his last point, that is, the question of confirming 
people before they are taught the Church. A dis- 
cussion followed : all agreed that there were two 
sides to the question. 

Rev. Mr. Jackson made another suggestion to the 
conference in regard to the Holy Communion ser- 
vice. The sup-^estions to be published and sent to 
all rural work rectors through out the diocese. 

"Rev. A. C. D. Noe reported for the third group. 
This group indorsed Rev. John Hardy's talk in toto. 
They appointed Mrs. J. Q. Beckwith to talk on the 
subject of confirmation. Mrs. Beckwith impressed 
the need of giving each member a definite thing to 
do in the Church. 

Rev. James Beckwith made the motion that the 
conference express to the members of Holy Inno- 
cents' Church at Seven Springs, their appreciation 
for the delightful dinner and wholesome hospitality 
enjoyed by ail. The motion Avas passed by a rising 
vote of thanks. 

Mr. Oscar Hardy made a closing remark as host 
of the conference. 

Rev. Leon Malone expressed his personal appre- 
ciation and the appreciation of the Rural Work Com- 
mittee for the splendid response shown by all to the 
conference. 

The Rev. A. C. D. Noe, Rector of Holy Innocents' 
Church. Seven Springs, closed the conference with 
the benediction. 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD 



Y. P. S. L. DISTRICT MEETINGS 



The District Meetings will convene at 2 o'clock 
in the afternoon at the following places on the' 
following- dates: 

District 1 — April 19th, Grace Church, Whiteville. 

District 2— May 10, St. Paul's, Vanceboro. 

District 3— April 26, St. Thomas', Bath. 

District 4— May 3, St. Thomas', Windsor. 

Program: Worship Service. Debate — Resolved, 
that the young people of today are more deeply 
religious than the young 1 people of previous gene- 
rations. 

District "I — Affirmative: St. Paul's, Clinton, and 
St. John's. Fayetteville. Negative: St. Paul's Wil- 
mington, and St. John's Wilmington. 

District 2 — Affirmative: St. Mary's, Kinston, and 
Holy Innocents', Seven Springs. Negative: Christ 
Church, New Bern, and St. Paul's Beaufort. 

District 3 — Affirmative: St. Peter's, Washington. 
Negative: Church of the Advent, Williamston. 

District 4 — Affirmative: Christ Church, Elizabeth 
City. Negative: St. Paul's, Edenton. 

Talks on Camp Leach. District 1--Rcverend 
James D. Beckwith. District 2 — Miss Ann Dawson. 
District 3 — Miss Katherine Harding. District 4 — 
Miss Sarah Sawyer and Mrs. Wm. Latta. 

Discussion — ''Where and how to develop and or- 
ganize new Leagues in this District". District Coun- 
sellor, 

Presentation of Thank Offering. Benediction. 

All young people, counselors, clergy, and inter- 
ested persons are cordially invited and urged to 
attend these meetings. 

We will have lunch immediately preceding the 
meeting. Everyone is asked to bring a picnic lunch. 

—The Searchlight. 



MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF 

Y. P. S. L. HELD MARCH 28TH, ST. PAUL'S, 

GREENVILLE 



The Diocesan Y. P. S. L. Executive Committee 
convened at 11 o'clock Saturday morning, March 28, 
in the Parish House of St. Paul's, Greenville. Those 
present were Billie Tillinghast Bessie Fay Hunt, 
Elinor Nelson, Gerard Hardy, Ann Dawson, Mrs. 
W. N. Tillinghast, the Rt. Rev Thomas C. Darst, 
the Rev. W. R. Noe, Miss Katherine Harding, John 
Bonner, and the Rev. James D. Beckwith. 

The year's work thus far was reviewed and many 
accomplishments noted. The making of plans for 
the District Meetings was perhaps the most impor- 
tant business taken up at this session. 



The president is urging every Leaguer to take 
part in the Poster Contest, the Provincial Program 
Contest, and the Bishop's Test 

The Rev. James Beckwith suggested that the 
Leagues conduct services in ways'ide communities. 
He stated that the Clinton League was planning to 
go to Salemburg in the near future and present the 
Episcopal Service. 

A delicious luncheon was served by the ladies ox 
the Parish. 

— The Searchlight. 



EAST CAROLINA RECEIVES CHALLENGE 
FROM SOUTHERN VIRGINIA TO DEBATE 



Our president announced at the Executive Com- 
mittee Meeting that the Young People's Fellowship 
of the Diocese of Southern Virginia had challenged 
us to a debate on the subject, Resolved, that the 
young people of today are more deeply religious 
than the young people of previous generations. The 
debate will probably take place some time in the 
late spring. 

At our District Meetings the Leagues are going 
to debate on the same subject and the best speakers 
will he chosen to represent East Carolina. 

—The Searchlight 



HOLY INNOCENTS', SEVEN SPRINGS 



As the League at Holy Innocents' is expected to 
furnish one of the debaters for the District Meeting 
to be held in Vanceboro., on the question: "Re- 
solved. That the young people of today are more 
religious than those of previous generations", we 
used this debate as our program at the League 
meeting Sunday evening, April 12. A large num- 
ber of members were present with a number of 
visitors, to hear the discussions which were very 
good, and well presented. 

In preparation for the debate the League was 
divided with half the members supporting each side, 
which had three debaters each. The judges were, 
Mrs. W. N. Davis, Mr. Oscar Hardy, and Mr. J. A. 
Williams. The affirmative side won. Taking pait 
were: Affirmative; Clyde Wessel Croom, Odell Bar- 
wick and Mildred Croom ; negative, Martha Rae 
Barwick, Bertha Newman, and Kathryn Croom. 

The League decorated the Church for the Easter 
morning service. The altar was banked with dog- 
wood, and jasmine, and urns with wild flowers 
were attractively arranged in the Church. Members 
assisted in the egg hunt, and they arranged an Eas- 
ter basket for a family living in the community, in 
which the league is helping. 

MILDRED CROOM 



APRIL. 1936 



13 



NOTES FROM FRIENDLY HALL 




Our March Auxiliary meeting was an unusually 
splendid one. The subject of it was "Christian Soc- 
ial Service". The meeting was opened with an 
appropriate hymn, scripture lesson, and prayers. 
After the business the Publicity Chairman gave a 
resume of the article by Dr. Nash in a copy of "The 
Spirit of Missions" entitled "the Parish as a Soc- 
ial instrument". The Social Service Chairman gave 
excerpts on Social Service from all the Forward 
Movement literature published so far. Elizabeth 
Wagner read t:,e poem "1 shall not pass this way 
again". The climax of the program was reached 
in a talk by the Rev. Mr. Jack Rountree of Kinston 
on "Practicing Jesus' Law of Love". His address 
was beautiful and inspiring, and at the same time 
very practical. We could not have had a more 
suitable talk for our meeting on "Christian Social 
Service", and we consider ourselves very fortunate 
to have had Mr. and Mrs. Rountree with us. 

We are glad to announce that when the L T n!ited 
Thank Offering for the women of the Parish was 
taken, on March 25th, eight dollars and sixty-five 
cents went in from the Student Branch. 

The greatest event of the month, and always the 
greatest of the year at Friendly Hall, was the Bish- 
op's Dinner, given on the evening of Saturday, 
March 28th. The spring color scheme of green and 
yellow was carried out in the profusion of daffodils, 
used throughout the banquet hall, in the table deco- . 
rations, and even in the delic'ous dinner served by 
the women of the senior Auxiliary. About twenty- 
five or thirty students were present, and we had as 
our guests Bishop Darst. Mr. and Mrs. Wicker, and 
other members of the Parish and College. After 
the s'nging of "Drink a toast to dear ol' Tom", 
and a solo "Fiddle and 1" by Miss Bessie Brown, 
we enjoyed an unusually delightful three-course din- 
ner, at the end of which Bishop Darst gave us his 
annual message. . He pointed out to us the Way 
alono- which we should direct our lives, and painted 



most vividly for us the' picture of the One Perfect 
Life which we, as young people, should use as a 
Pattern for our own — the Life of our Lord Jesus 
Christ. 

MARY TARRY 

Publicity Chairman of the Student 
Branch of the Woman's Auxiliary 



THOMPSON ORPHANAGE NOTES 



The Easter Monday Egg- Hunt 

On Easter Monday, as has been the custom for 
many years, St. Peter's Church Service League gave 
an Easter egg hunt on the Orphanage Campus. 
By a strange coincidence as the children were racing 
over the lawns in search of the eggs which had been 
carefully hidden, a large truck passed down the 
street in front of the Orphanage with a phonograph 
contained therein which was blaring forth the popu- 
lar song, "I'm putting al! my eggs in one basket". 
None of the children needed the stimulus of this 
song and it is very doubtful if any of them heard it, 
they certainly did not stop to listen. Prizes were 
given those finding the largest number of eggs and 
ice cream in Dixie Cups was served to all present. 
Mrs. H. P. Neblet't and Mrs. S. P. Hutchison, Jr., 
planned and directed the Hunt. It was a beautiful 
day and a happy one. 

The Prize- Winning Essays 

Frances Oatlin and Herbert Hobbs won the prizes 
this year for the. best essays on the subject, "What 
the Orphanage has meant to me". These prizes 
are awarded annually by Miss Emma Hall and many 
of the children submit essays. 

The Bird House Contest and the Flower Show 

Some unusually attractive bird houses have been 
built by the boys and on April 24th Mr. Harry Lucas 
will award prizes to the builders of the best houses. 
Then on May 8th and 9th at the Flower Show given 
by the Garden Club in the Armory Auditorium these 
houses will be displayed in a booth planned and 
decorated by the boys. At this time bird houses 
are sold and orders taken if there are not enough 
houses to meet the demand. 

The Easter Clothing Boxes 

We wish to take this opportunity to express our 
most grateful appreciation for the lovely Easter 
clothing boxes received by the children. This xevy 
generous and loving provision for their clothing 
needs helps to make their Easter a glad and joyous 
occasion. 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD 



MRS. HABERSHAM VISITS ST. PAUL'S PARISH, 
GREENVILLE 



IN MEMORIAM 



On March 27th the members of St. Paul's parish 
and a number of people from nearby parishes en- 
joyed seeing the moving pictures Mrs. Habersham 
has taken in Palestine. The pictures of the Bedouin 
people gave a clear idea of the way the peopel lived 
in the time of Christ. Particularly 'interesting was 
the picture of the mother sitting on the ground, 
wrapping her four day old baby in swaddling clothes. 

All the familiar places connected with Christ's 
thirty-three years on earth were shown on the screen, 
Bethlehem, Jerusalem, Dead Sea. Sea of Galilee, 
the river Jordan, the places of burial and many 
more, too numerous to mention. 

The most interesting part of the program was 
Mrs. Habersham's informal talk. She made the life 
of Christ so vivid and so real, one felt that it was 
almost unnecessary to see the pictures. 

On Hood Friday a special offering throughout 
the Church is taken to promote the work at Jeru- 
salem. Canon Bridgeman is in charge of the work. 
No doubt the offering this year will be larger, es- 
pecially where the work at Jerusalem has been 
shown by Mrs. Habersham. 

Th<> pictures of the Missionary work in China 
were interesting, especially the work at St. Hilda's 
School where one of our own East Carolina mis- 
sionaries. Miss Venetia Cox, is located. 

Department of Publicity 
of the Woman's Auxiliary-. 



CHURCH SCHOOL CONTEST 



Winners of the scholarships to Camp Leach, of- 
fered by the Department of Religious Education, for 
the best papers on a missionary subject or project, 
will be announced at an early date. This contest 
was in the interest of the Lenten Mite Box Offering 
and many papers were sent in by Church School 
members. 

SEMINARY STUDENTS TO SERVE CHURCHES 
IN THE DIOCESE DURING SUMMER MONTHS 



Mr. 0. Worth May and Mr. Frederic A. Turner 
of the Theological Seminary in Virginia, will serve 
churches in the Diocese during the summer months. 

Mr. May will serve St. James', Ayden ; St. John's, 
Pitt County; St. Mark's, Grifton ; Holy Innocents', 
Seven Springs; and St. Lukes, Winterville. 

Mr. Turner will serve the churches in Hyde Coun- 
ity: St. George's, Lake Landing; Calvary, Bwan 
Ounrter: All Saints' Fairfield; and St. John's, 
Sladesville. 



Mrs. Mary Bond Urquhart, widow of the late 
Burges Urquhart, died on March 29, 1936, at the 
home of her daughter, Mrs. Thomas W. Griffin, 
Woodville, N. C. 

Mrs. Urquhart was born October 13, 1846 in Bertie 
County, and was the daughter of Lewis and Mar- 
garet Clark Thompson. 

She is survived by five of her eight children, the 
living children are Mrs. C. A. Whitehead, Mrs. Thos. 
W. Griffin, Mrs. Charles B. Griffin, Burges and R. A. 
Urquhart. 

Lewis Thompson her oldest son, died in his 23rd 
year, Mary Norfleet in her 42nd year and Annie 
Whitmel in infancy. 

The crowning beauty of her life was her simple 
faith in Christ, and her love and loyalty to Him and 
His Church never waned. 

All calls for help to those less fortunate than her- 
self she gave generously. Her devotion and love 
in her own home circle shone supremely, always 
sharing the pleasures and sorrows that came. 

When we joined the Woman's Auxiliary in the 
1890's she was the moving spirit and set us the fine 
example of giving of her income in full proportion 
for the work of the Church at home and abroad. 

As president of our Woman's Auxiliary, I wish 
to express o\w appreciation for the help and in- 
spiration she has been to us. 

After our matchless service in Grace Episcopal 
Church, Woodville, conducted by her Rector, Rev. 
W. M. Latta, assisted by her former Rector and 
friend Rev. M. E. Bethea. her body was tenderly 
placed in the Church yard among her dear ones 
whence her lovely spirit had gone. 

Where loyal hearts and true 
Stand ever in the light. 
All rapture through and through, 
In God's most holy sight. 

HELEN WILLIAMS PHELPS 



MRS. LILLIE R. HORTON 



In loving memory of Mrs. Lillie R. Horton who 
departed this life May 5th, 1935. 

The Auxiliary of Emmanuel Church, Farmville, 
N. C wishes to pny tribute to one whose loyalty to 
the Church and the Auxiliary was a splendid in- 
spiration to all who knew her. We wish to express 
our deep sense of loss, our only consolation being 
that our loss is His gain. 






APRIL. 1936 



15 



CHARLES S. DIXON 

Whereas God, in His infinite wisdom, has called to 
his long rest, Charles S. Dixon, for many years an in- 
valuable member of the vestry of the Church of the 
Holy Cross, Aurora. 

Now, therefore, the rector and vestry of the 
Church of the Holy Cross, Aurora, in meeting assem- 
bled this ninth day of March, 1936, do hereby re- 
cord their profound sorrow at their loss, which is as 
well tiic loss of all those who were privileged to have 
come in contact with the man ; their deep sympathy 
with the members of his family; and their abiding 
belief that he has but marched onward to a merited 
and everlasting reward. 

Recorded this ninth day of March, 1936, and order- 
ed that copies hereof be forwarded to the family and 
to the diocesan organ, "The Mission Herald" for ap- 
propriate notice. 

JxNO. B. BONNER, 

(Clerk of the Vestry.) 



MRS. COTTIE C. CHESSON 



The gentle spirit of Mrs. Cottie C. Chesson passed 
from this life, into life everlasting, March 24, 1936. 

Prom her earliest years she was a faithful mem- 
ber of the Church. She was a devoted and loving 
wife and mother. 

By her serenity in trials, sorrow and pain, we 
know that she dwelt "in the secret, place of the 
Most High", "under the shadow of the Almighty". 

She was pleasant and gracious in her home, and a 
loyal friend. No unkind word was ever known 
to pass her lips. She truly spent her eighty-one 
years in ministering to all around her. 

She will be missed in the Church as well as the 
home, but we believe she has joined the Communion 
of Saints and is at rest. 



STATEMENT OF THE AMOIVTS PAID BY THE PARISHES AND MISSIONS FOR DIOCESAN AND GENERAL. 

CHURCH WORK, JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1930. 



Parishes 

Atkinson, St. Thomas' 

Beaufort, St. Paul's 

Clinton, St. Pauls 

Fayetteville, St John's 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 

Hope Mil'is, Christ Church.'.... 

Kinston, St. Mary's 

New Bern, Chr st Church 

Red Springs, St. Stephen's 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents* 

Sr>uthport, St. Philip's 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd... 

Wilmington. St. James' 

Wi mington. St. John's 

Wilmington, St. Paul's 



Organized M'ssions 

Burgaw, St. Mary's 

Faison, St. Gabriel's. 



Aurora, Holy Cross.... 

Ayden, St. James* 

Bfi f h, St. Thomas' 

Belhaven, St James'.... 
Bonnerton, St. John's.. 
Chocowinity, Trinity. . . 
Columbia, St Andrew's. 
Creswell, St. David's... 
Fdenton, St. Paul's. 



Elizabeth City, Christ Church.. 

Farmville, Emmanuel 

Gatesville, St. Mary's 

Greenv Te. St. Paul's 

Grif ton, St. John's 

Hampton, St. Martin's 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 

.Tessama, Zion 

Bake Banding, St. George's..., 

Plymouth, Grace Church 

Roper, St. Buke's 

Washington, St. Peter's 

Williamston, Advent 



CONVOCATION OF WILMINGTON 



Expec- 


Paid to 


tations 


April 17th 


10.00 




316 15 


40.00 


110.00 




1,600.00 


547 55 


860.40 


182.80 


60.00 


38.30 


1,000.00 


250.0(7 


1,624.20 


320.59 


75.00 


23.48' 


200.00 




lcn.eo 


54.35 


375.0(1 


38.57 


8,280.00 


1,522.37 


1,800.00 


385.51 


1,200.00 


366.35 


35.00 


3.36 


23 00 




CONVOCATIO 


250.00 




300 00 




35.00 




250.00 


62.50 


100.00 


10.75 


100.00 




200.00 




250.00 




1,488.98 


200. 00 


1,008.76 


176 89 


238 20 


25.00 


100.00 




1,356.20 


230.77 


200.00 




75.00 




317.20 


50 00 


100.00 


10.00 


200.00 


20.00 


150 00 




65.00 


7.20 


1,5^0.00 


489.51 


100.00 


25.00 



Bumberton, Trinity 

North West, All Soul's 

Pikeville, St. George's 

Trenton, Grace Church 

Vanceboro, St. Paul's 

Whiteville. Grace Church.. 
Wr ghtsville, St. Andrew's. 



Unorganized Missions 

Jasper, St. Thomas' 

Pollocksville, Mission. ...... 

Wi'mington, Delgado Mission. 

Parochial Missions 

Campbellton, St. Philip's ... 
Tolar-Hart, Good Shepherd... 



Total. 



W r.dsor. St. Thomas* 

Winion, St. John's 

Woodville, Grace Church. 



Organized Missions 

Ahoskie, St. Thomas' 

Fairfield. All Saints' 

Murfrff-sboro, St. Barnabas' 

P.oxobel, St. Mark's 

Sladesville, St. John's 

Snow Hill, St. Barnabas'.... 

Sunbury, St. Peter's 

Swan Quarter, Calvary .... 
Wi^terville, St. Buke's ... 
Yeatesville, St. Matthew's.. 



Unorganized Missions 

Avoea, Holy Innocents'.... 
Camden, St. Joseph's 



Total. 



Parishes 

Fayetteville, St. Joseph's. 
New Bern, St. Cyprian's... 
Wilmington, St. Mark's... 



Organized M'ssions 

Belhaven, St Mary's 

Fdenton, St. John -Evangelist . 

Elizabeth City, St. Philiip's 

Goldsboro. St. Andrew's.. 

Kinston, St. Augustine's 

Washington, St. Paul's 



CONVOCATION OF COLORED CHURCH WORKERS 

Unorganized Missions 

Aurora, St. Jude's 

Beaufort, St. Clement's 

Greenville, St. Andrew's 

Haddock's X Roads, St. Stephen's 
Roper, St. Ann's 

Wilmington, "Brooklyn" Mission 
Wrightsville, St. Augustine's... 



243.60 


25.00 


362.00 




140.00 




100.00 




110.00 




23 00 




65.00 




80.00 


13.50 


120.00 


10.00 



Total 

Gr;ind Total. 



Expec- 


Paid to 


tations 


April 17th 


175 00 


42.00 


10.00 




20.00 


20.00 


15.00 




30.00 




100.00 




25.00 


I: ■ ■ ! il 


20.00 


:...,(-■ 


20.00 




15.00 




10.00 




75.00 


7.32 


18,253.35 


3,843.35 


225.00 


32 68 


80.00 


4.30 


150.00 


28.98 


50.00 
10.00 


201.00 


. 30.00 


7.50 


92.00 


49.92 


10.00 




100.00 




46.35 


8.00 


20.00 




125.00 


40 00 


20.00 




50.00 




10.00 




$ 9,402 69 


1,499.00 


36.00 


3.00 


40.00 


11.73 


30.00 


5. CO 


35.00 




25.00 




is. 00 




18.00 




$ 1,445.60 


68.23 


$29,101.64 


5,410.58 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD 



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Walsh, Walterboro, South Carolina. 



Form of Bequest 



I hereby, give, devise, and bequeath to 



I 



the Trustees of the Protestant Episcopal s 



Church in the Diocese of East Carolina. 



to be held by them in trust for. 



ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

Conducted for Negro Youth under the auspices of the Epis- 
copal Church. 

A four year accredited College Course is offered, leading to 
degrees of B. A. and B. S., including Pre-Medical work and 
teacher Training for State High School Teachers' certificates. 

A College Preparatory Department, Training School for Nurses 
and School for Religious and Social Workers are connected with 
the College. 

Thorough training, healthy environment Christian influences. 
For Catalog and information write — 

The Registrar 
ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE, RALEIGH, N. C. 



+ ., 



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Fliirene 



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Made in East Carolina — Usad Everywhere 



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4-PLY CROCKET YARN 
50c PER POUND 

WRITE US FOR SPECIAL CLUB 
RATES IN 50 LB. LOTS 

TOLAR, HART & HOLT MILLS 

FAYETTEVILLE, N. C 






Meares Insurance Agency 

815 Murchison Building 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



— + 



I SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 
I JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

An Episcopal School for girls — Have your daughter 
receive her education in a church school. 

Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, B. S., 
Principal 

Saint Mary's offers 4 years' High School and 2 
years' College work all fully accredited by the South- 
ern Association. Also courses in Music, Art, Ex- 
pression, Home Economics, and Business. 

20-Acre Campus. Gym and Field Sports. Tennis. 
Indoor Tiled Swimming Pool. Horseback 
R'ding. Golf 

A. W. TUCKER, Business Manager. 



► — 



S.'$3,<rt» 



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kibraary. U. IT. C. 
Chapel Hill, N. C, 



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MAY, 1936 






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THE MISSION HERALD 



CAMP LEACH 

The Time of the Camps is as Follows: 

Senior Young People's Camp (Ages 15 to 24) June 15-June 28 
Junior Camp for Boys (Ages 12 to 15) June 28-July 12 

Junior Camp for Girls (Ages 12 to 15) July 12-July 26 

Midget Boys' and Girls' Camp (Ages 9 to 12) July 26-Aug. 2 



Directors: 



Senior Camp, The Rev. George S. Gresham 

Junior Boys' Camp, The Rev. George S. Gresham 
Junior Girls' Camp, Miss Maxine Westphall 
Midget Camp, Rev. James Beckwith 

Bishop Darst will be Chaplain of the Senior Camp 



SOME OF THE TEACHERS 
WILL BE: 

THE REV. W. R. NOE 
THE REV. ALEXANDER MILLER 
REV. EDWARD MOSELY 
REV. JOHN ERWIN 
MISS ANNIE MORTON STOUT 
REV. JAMES BECKWITH 






SOME OF THE STAFF OF THE 
SENIOR CAMP WILL BE: 

J. WESTON HODGES 
REV. JOHN HARDY 
REV. LAWRENCE FENWICK 
MRS. ELIZABETH PERKINS 
MISS BESSIE BROWN 
MISS ESTELLE GREEN 
MISS ELIZ \BETH ANDREWS 
MRS. LAWRENCE PENWICK 
MR. JOHN BECKWITH 
MISS SUE MARTIN CAPEHART 



For Further Information, Write 

REV. STEPHEN GARDNER, Manager 

Washington, North Carolina 



*&&&p8&^ $$&£%8&^^ 



The Mission Herald 



VOLUME L 



WILMINGTON, N. C. Mav. 19:56 



NUMBER 5 



BISHOP'S ANNUAL ADDRESS 



Brethren of the Clergy and Laity 
of the Dioeese of East Carolina — 

"Grace be unto you and peace from God our 
Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ." 

We meet together for our fifty-third Annual Con- 
vention in this historic Church which has stood in 
this community as a witness for Christ and His 
cause for two hundred fruitful years. 

We are indeed encompassed about by a noble, 
crowd of witnesses, including those hardy pioneers 
who found within these walls the inspiration and 
courage and faith to build a new nation upon the 
eternal principles laid down by a God in Whom 
they believed. 

May some measure of their faith and courage 
and loyalty to noble ideals come into our hearts 
today as we go forward with Christ to win new 
frontiers for Him and His Church. 

Thankful to Cod for His continued protection 
and blessing, I am happy to report that our Diocese 
recovered much lost ground during the past year, 
and through the sacrificial generosity of many of 
our people,, was able to meet its missionary obli- 
gations to the General Church in full, and to close 
the year without a deficit. 

The Bishop's Twentieth Anniversary Fund 

So wisely conceived and intelligently planned, has 
met with a generous response in every place where 
'it was adequately presented, and if this fine move- 
ment is not allowed to flag, I am confident that 
we will be freed from our burden of debt in four 
years, thus releasing us for new and constructive 
service in places too long neglected. 

The Negro Work 

The work in our Negro Churches and Missions 
while sadly crippled by the repeated cuts in our 
appropriation, has shown marvelous vigor and life 
during the past year, the Confirmations for that 
period representing ten per cent of our total Negro 
Communicant strength. 

I believe the time has come when we should at 
least seriously consider the possibility of taking 
over the support of our own Negro work, and if 
plans can be carried out for securing a larger meas- 
ure of self-support from our Negro Communicants, 
I am satisfied that East Carolina may be able to 



withdraw all requests for outside assistance in the 
not far distant future. 

This greatly desired result can never be attained, 
however, until we are able to make some very neces- 
sary adjustments in our 

Aided Parishes and Missions 

In my Annual Address to the Convention in Beau- 
fort last year, 1 said: "We must increase the num- 
ber of self-supporting parishes and fields in order 
that our resources may be used in the extension of 
His Kingdom — for an advance movement into those 
fields of real need that have waited for us so long." 

I still stand by that statement, but the problem 
is far greater than the mere question of releasing 
diocesan funds for use in other places. It is a 
question of the spiritual health and vitality of the 
places which have been aided so long that their 
people have lost much of the joy and thrill of sacri- 
ficial giving. 

We have made appropriations year after year, 
not chiefly to Mission stations in our mill towns 
and rural neighborhoods, but to staid old parishes 
in many of which there has been no growth during 
the past twenty-five years. 

We have done this in order to keep them alive, 
and I am afraid that, in some instances, we have 
harmed our patients far more than we have helped 
them. 

This is not the time nor place to examine the needs 
and resources of the various aided fields, but I must 
emphasize the fact that we are carrying a diocesan 
missionary budget far out of proportion to the 
size of our Diocese and the results obtalined in 
Baptisms and Confirmations. 

The whole question of diocesan appropriations to 
aided fields should engage the intelligent interest, 
not only of the members of the Executive Council, 
but of this largei- and more representative gathering 
as well. 

I am not unmindful of the serious financial situ- 
ation in many of our aided fields, and I know that 
several of the old parishes receiving aid can never 
become self-supporting units, but there must be a 
regrouping of fields to the end that the Clergyman 
in charge may receive the greater part, if not ail, 
of his salary from the points served by him. 

Woman's Work 

As usual, we are able to sound a heartening and 
encouraging note as we report on the organized 
activities of the women of the Diocese during' the 



THE MISSION HERALD 



past year. Under the intelligent and consecrated 
leadership of their Diocesan and Parochial officers, 
the women of East Caolina have not only continued 
to maintain their own high standards, but have, 
through their helpful and constructive programs, 
made a real contribution to other dioceses through- 
out the Church. It is a significant tribute to the 
leadership of our women that one of our former 
Diocesan presidents, Mrs. Henry J. MacMillan, is 
the President of the Woman's Auxiliary of the 
Provtince of Sewanee. and our present President, 
Mrs. Pred L. Outland, is Chairman of the National 
Committee on Women's work in the Forward Move- 
ment. 

Young- People's Work 

The work for and among our young people is 
rich in possibilities, but is not developing as rapidly 
as it should for several reasons : one being the diffi- 
culty of securing wise and understanding men and 
women to serve as cousellors in our parish leagues 
and as teachers in our Church schools; and, another, 
our failure, because of lack of funds, to secure a 
full time Field Secretary for Religious Education 
and young people's work. If the proper person 
for this important post could be secured. I am con- 
fident that we would be able to make real progress 
in training our young people for intelligent leader- 
ship in the Church of tomorrow. 

Plans have been completed for our usual young 
people's conferences at Camp Leach this summer, 
and we ask the continued interest of our people in 
this most hopeful phase of our diocesan life. 

The Missionary Crisis 

In a recent letter from Bishop Cook, President 
of the National Council, he thanked the Diocese of 
East Carolina for our part in making up the serious 
deficit which threatened disaster to the Church's 
work at the beginning of the year, and went on 
to say: "The fact that the budget has been bal- 
anced is a credit to the Church, and another ex- 
perience which confirms my conviction that when 
we are frank and let the Church's needs be known, 
we can depend upon our people to respond." 

We agree, of course, with this general statement, 
and while the balancing of the budget was "a credit 
to the Church", there is something seriously wrong 
with the missionary spirit of the Church when our 
National Council is forced to send out such an alarm- 
ing message as came to us a few months ago. 

We must not only be frank and let the Church's 
needs be known, but must so revitalize the entire 
missionary program that it will cease to be looked 
upon as something related to dreary budgets and 
annual quotas, but as the spirit of the living, ad- 
venturous Christ at work in human society. We 



must present the needs of the Church, not simply in 
terms of paying the salaries of faithful workers in 
China or Japan or Alaska, but as an opportunity 
to share WJth Christ in His blessed work of re- 
demption. 

We must go forward with Christ, not only along 
roads of communion and fellowship, but as joyful, 
enthusiastic co-workers in His glorious plans for 
the making of a new world in which righteousness 
and peace shall be supreme. 

We cannot with-hold our resources — spiritual or 
material if we expect to play our part in His plans 
for the transformation of a broken and disillusioned 
world. 

Money is coined human energy and in giving that 
which represents the fruit of our hands, or our 
brains, we are in a real sense giving ourselves. In 
our small feeble way, we are really offering our- 
selves for the sins of the world. We are taking a 
symbol of barter and exchange and making it a 
sacrament of loving service. 

When the offering of self and substance becomes 
sacramental in the Church, we need not worry about 
deficits or curtailments, for we will have at least 
reached that stage of spiritual development in which 
the oft repeated words of the noble Communion 
Office will become so real that we will gladly offer 
and present ourselves, our souls and bodies to be a 
"reasonable, holy and living sacrifice." 

The Call of the Hour 

Surely the call of the hour can be nothing less 
stirring or compelling than the call of our Master 
Christ to go forward with Him to certain victory. 
The clouds of war are gathering on' every horizon. 
The voices of hate and fear and cruel poverty sound 
their discordant notes in every quarter of the world. 
Man's inhumanity to man still fills the world with 
bewildered souls who cry out for justice. Greed, 
sensuality and soul destroying vice still show their 
brazen faces in the streets where men and women 
and children wander aimlessly in their search for 
the peace and purity which is their heritage. 

The battles between purity and foulness, truth 
and falsehood, honor and dishonor, the powers ot 
heaven and the powers of hell are being fought 
today in human souls, in the homes of our people, 
in the Church and state and nation, and if we have 
the faintest spark of the Divine light within us, 
if we carry in our souls even the dimmest image 
of our Lord, we must go forward and join our 
Master Christ as He throws His life once more 
into the very center of the world's unrest and agony. 

The future of the civilization that our fathers 
died to establish, the peace of the world for which 
the Son of God became Incarnate, the mission of 



MAY, 1936 



the Church for which He died, are all at stake 
today, and if we be Christ's men we must join 
forces with Him in that struggle which must not end 
until the purpose of God dominates the world, and 
the mind of Jesus controls in loving power the 
hearts and minds of all men everywhere. 

In a recent address on "The Christian Task To- 
day", the Hon. Francis B. Sayre, Assistant Secre- 
tary of State closed his ringing message with these 
words : 

"If our civilization cannot be brought to under- 
stand more clearly and to believe more strongly 
in the fundamental teachings of Jesus Christ, and 
the principles upon which He staked His life, our 
civilization cannot survive. I mean that men must 
of their own consciousness come 'to perceive the 
utter folly of trying to build a civilization on ma- 
terialism and brute force, and come to realize, per- 
haps through suffering, that the enduring values 
that humanity will always crave, grow out of un- 
derstanding and love and self sacrifice. There is 
only one way to make men realize that. 

We must go back to the living Christ, to the 
audacious, thrilling, winsome figure that actually 
lived. 

Unless men learn to love Him, they will not follow 
Him. Neither will they come to understand how 
to master life. 

That is the mission of Christianity to the present 
world, as I see it. As one catches the vision of all 
that hangs upon the outcome, the call of Christ be- 
comes the most exciting challenge in the world 
today." 

Above the noise and tumult, the voice of Christ 
is heard today — "I am the way, follow Me". 

In utter loyalty to Him, in absolute confidence 
that His way is the way to victory and to peace, 
may we, the Clergy and laity of this Diocese dedi- 
cate ourselves wholly and joyfully to His service. 



RETIREMENT OF REV. WILLIAM H. 
MILTON, D. D. 



WHITSUNTIDE 



Srririt of mercy, truth, and love, 
Oh. shed thine influence from above; 
And still from ace to age convey 
The wonders of this sacred day. 

In every clime, by every tongue, 
Be God's surpassing glory sung: 
Let all the listening earth be taught 
The deeds our great Redeemer wrought. 

Unfailing Comfort, heavenly Guide, 
Still o'er Thy holy Church preside; 
Still let mankind Thy blessings prove ; 
Spirit of mercy, truth, and love. 



By the Bishop of the Diocese 

It is with a feeling of profound regret that I an- 
nounce the decision of the Rev. William H. Milton, 
D. D., to retire from active service on November I, 
1936. 

For more than twenty-seven years Dr. Milton has 
exercised an inspiring and helpful ministry, not only 
in St. James', Wilmington, but in the Diocese and 
National Church, and his going from us will leave a 
gap in our Diocesan life that it will be hard to fill. 
He has ever placed first things first, and, with 
beautiful self-forgetfulness, has always emphasized 
'the importance of loyalty and sacrificial generosity 
to Christ and His Church. 

Under his leadership, St. James', Wilmington, has 
become one of the great missionary-minded parishes 
in the American Church, erecting and maintaining 
standards of service and stewardship that have in- 
spired countless other parishes to move upward to 
higher planes of devotion and generosity. 

It is safe to say that during the past seventeen 
years, or since the inauguration of the Nation-Wide 
Campaign, in which Dr. Milton played such a fine 
part, his parish has contributed more than two hun- 
dred thousand dollars to the work of the Diocese and 
General Church, and made it possible for East Caro- 
ina to stand very near the top in its response to the 
call of Christ for the extension of this work through- 
out the world. 

But it is not only in ability to inspire his people to 
generous giving that has made his ministry so out- 
standing in East Carolina. As a great preacher of 
the Gospel of Christ, as a beloved and faithful pastor 
and friend,, as a wise and understanding counsellor 
and leader in Diocesan affairs, he has left a lasting 
memorial in the hearts of the people of his parish and 
Diocese. 

We shall miss him from the active ranks of our 
Diocese, but we are happy to know that he will con- 
tinue as a non-parochial clergyman of East Carolina 
and we will hope to have his interest and counsel 
during the coming years. 

Our prayers and affection will go with him as he 
continues, with larger liberty of time, to make his 
splendid contribution to the life of the Church to 
which he has given so many blessed, faithful years. 
As his Bishop and friend, to whom he has given 
such loyal and understanding cooperation, I desire 
that this inadequate tribute be recorded in the min- 
utes of the Convention. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



MEETING OF THE CONVENTION 



The 53rd meeting of the Convention of the Diocese 
of East Carolina was held in St. Paul's Church, 
Edenton, May 13, 14 1936. . 

The Holy Communion was celebrated at 7 :30 A. 
M. by the Bishop, assisted by the Rev. Stephen Gard- 
ner, President of the Standing Committee and the 
Rev. Walter R. Noe, Secretary of the Convention. 

At 10:00 A. M., May 13th, the Convention was or- 
ganized by the reelection of the Rev. Robert Brent 
Drane, D. D., President and the Rev. Water R. Noe, 
Secretary. 

After the appointment of Committees and consid- 
eration of the report of the Committee on Canons, 
the Bishop delivered his Annual Address. 

This was followed by the Annual Address of the 
President of the Woman's Auxiliary and an address 
by Miss Eliazabeth Andrews of the Student Center 
at Greenville. 

Most of the day was given to the business session 
of the Convention, when the reports of Committees 
and matters of importance were given careful con- 
sideration. 

In the evening, after a short service by the Bishop, 
an address on the Forward Movement was made by 
Rev. W. H. Milton, D. D., Rector of St. James', Wil- 
mington. 

On the second day the Holy Communion was cele- 
brated at 7 :30 A. M. by the Rev. John W. Hardy, as- 
sisted by the Rev. E, C. McConnell. 

The business session began at ten o'clock and 
lasted for about an hour. 



THE REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF 
FINANCE TO THE ANNUAL CONVENTION 



The report of this department will be very brief. 
Although receipts from parishes and missions for the 
year ending December 31st, were only $26,000.00 in- 
stead of $32,000.00 as promised, the Diocese was able 
to close its books for the year with all bills paid, and 
with no increase in our debt. For this we are grate- 
ful, and we congratulate the Bishop and the Diocesan 
Office for the way they handled available funds to 
accomplish this result. 

The Department' is recommending no change in the 
Budget under which we worked last year. If the 
returns from parishes and misisons approximate re- 
ported expectations we will again close the year with 
all our obligations met. While this is in happy con- 
trast to the deficits we have had to report during the 
past few years, even the present financial status is 
far from satisfactory. 

Last year our accomplishment was a purely ne<ra- 
tive one. We did not go further into debt. We fail- 



ed, however, to provide funds for the much needed 
restoration in the stipends of the Missionary Clergy 
and Lay Workers!, and no funds were available for 
expansion of Diocesan work. The outlook for the 
current year shows no improvement in this situation, 
which unless changed for the better, will inevitably 
. change for the worse. 

We cannot continue to ask our clergy and lay 
workers to continue indefinitely the sacrifices cheer- 
fully accepted in the depths of the depression, and if 
the Diocese is to do the work it was created to do, 
we cannot continue to refuse to enter fields long wait- 
ing for us, nor can we continue to neglect important 
work necessary for our future well being, notably 
the building up of our Church Schools and the train- 
ing of our Church School teachers. The salary of 
a secretary for this work should be a part of our 
budget, but no funds are available. 

What is the answer to this situation this year with 
our Every Member Canvass behind us? There are 
two answers : 

First, and most important ; a determined effort in 
every parish and mission in the Diocese to meet re- 
ported expectancies 100%. 

Second, the development of the Pence Plan to its 
easily realized possibilities by the interested active 
cooperation of the clergy of the Diocese in presentng 
the Plan to their respective fields independent and 
missionary. A Pence Can in active use in every 
home would materially increase our financial re- 
sources and would not the resultant spiritual reac- 
tion be equally great because of the offering made 
three times daily in thanksgiving to Cod for His 
watchful care over us? 



PROPOSED CHANGE IN THE CONSTITUTION 



The following report was made to the Convention 
by the Committee on Canons: 

Convention at Edenton, N. C. 
1 ' May 13, 14, 1936. 

The Committee on Revision of Canons re-intro- 
duces the following resolution : 

RESOLVED: That Article IV, Section 3, of the 
Constitution be amended by striking out the word 
"male", and the following words relating to the pos- 
sible electing of a delegate from another parish, and 
by adding the words "one of whom may be a wom- 
an." 

The amended section would then read as follows: 

"Each regularly organized parish or mission within 
the Diocese shall be entitled to be represented by one 
or more Lay Delegates not exceeding four, one of 
whom may be a woman, chosen by the Vestry from 
the Communicants of the Parish, or by the Congrega- 



MAY, 1936 



tion of the Mission from the Communicants of the 
Mission. No person, Clerical or Lay, under Ecclesi- 
astical censure, publicly declared by a competent 
tribunal, shall be admissible to a seat in the Conven- 
tion." 

REASON for Re-introduction. This resolution was 
passed on its first reading on May 17, 1933 at the Fif- 
tieth Annual Convention at New Bern, N. C. 

Under and by force of Article XV of the Constitu- 
tion any proposition to change the Constitution must 
be in writing and if approved by a majority of the 
Convention, it shall be submitted to the NEXT Con- 
vention and if approved by a majority of the two 
Orders present i't shall become a part of this Consti- 
tution. 

The word "shall" in its legal and constitutional 
meaning is interpreted as MUST and the word NEXT 
means nearest in time. As this proposition was not 
submitted to the 1934 Convention or was submitted 
and a majority of the two orders were not present 
and did not approve it. same is herewith reintroduc- 
ed to be acted upon and finally to be approved at the 
Convention of 1937. 

After discussion, the resolution was passed on its 
first reading, and will be given consideration at the 
Convention to be held in Goldsboro in 1937. 



RESOLUTION OF CONVENTION ON RETIRE. 
MENT OF DR. MILTON 



DELEGATES TO THE PROVINCIAL SYNOD 



The Convention elected delegates and alternate 
delegates to the meeting of the Provincial Synod to 
be held in New Orleans in the fall, as follows: 

Delegates 

Clerical- Rev. Walter R. Noe. Wilmington; Rev. 
W. H. Milton. D. D., Wilmington; Rev. Stephen 
Gardner Washington ; Rev. Alexander Miller, Wil- 
mington: Rev. E. F. Moseley. Williamston ; Rev. B. 

F. Huske. D. D., Kinston. 

Lay: Mr. Ashley T. St.Amand. Wilmington; Mr. 
George B. Ell'ott, Wilmington; Mr. John G. Bragaw, 
Washington; Mr. John R. Tolar, Fayetteville ; Mr. 
George C. Royall, Goldsboro; Mr. E. K. Bishop, New 
Bern. 

Alternate Delegates 

Clerical: Rev. C. E. Williams, New Bern; Rev. 

G. S. Gresham, Goldsboro: Rev. Worth Wicker, 
Greenville: Rev. E. C. McConnell, Wilmington; Rev. 
E. W. Halleck, Wilmington; Rev. L. M. Fenwick, 
Beaufort. 

Lay: Major Vernon L. Nash, Lumberton; Mr. 
Dal F. Wooten. Kinston ; Mr. Stanley Woodland, 
MoreVad City; Mr. C. R. Wheatley. Beaufort; Mr. 
H. E. Rodwrs, Wilmington. 



Resolved, that the announced purpose of Dr. Wm. 
H. Milton, to retire from active service as Rector of 
St. James' Parish, Wilmington,, is received by this 
'Convention with real regret. 

For twenty-seven years he has participated in the 
deliberations of the Annual Conventions of this Dio- 
cese. Always he has stood for those things which 
would aid in the advancement of the real mission of 
the Church, the just and efficient management of 
both its temporal and its spiritual interests, and the 
spread of its influence through the Diocese, the State 
and the world. 

His service in all of the greater movements of the 
General Church, and as a member of its National 
Council gave him a comprehensive knowledge of the 
affairs, the needs and ambitions of the 'Church as a 
whole. This knowledge has enabled him to aid our 
deliberations with wise and informed counsel, and to 
help us in the solution of many problems. 

His leadership in his own Parish, and in its partici- 
pation in support of the Diocesan work has been out- 
standing, and has made him and his people one of 
the principal factors supporting that work. That he 
now feels it proper to retire from further active par- 
ticipation in the work is greatly regretted, but in 
leaving our ranks he will take with him the affec- 
tionate regard of the members of this Convention 
and of those who have served with him in the past ; 
our deep appreciation of his generous and whole- 
hearted efforts in behalf of God's work in our midst, 
and our prayers for his continued success in the 
service of his Master in such fields as he may labor 
unto his life's end. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. A. ASHBY 
GEORCE B. ELLIOTT 



CELEBRATION OF THE TWO HUNDREDTH 

ANNIVERSARY OF PRESENT ST. PAUL'S 

CHURCH, EDENTON 



On the second day of the Convention, at 11 :00 
A. M., the two hundredth Anniversary of the pres- 
ent St. Paul's Church, Edenton, was celebrated. 

After a short service by the Bishop, addresses 
were made by Mr. John Washington Graham and 
Mrs. C. P. Wales of St. Paul's Parish. Mr. Graham 
told of the organization of the Parish, the building 
of the present Church, and the work of each Rector 
preceding Dr. Drane, and Mrs. Wales told of the 
work of Dr. Drane, who was Rector of the Parish 
for 56 years. 

The benediction was pronounced by Dr. Drane. 



TH3 MISSION HERALD 



The Mission Herald 

ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 
Published Monthly except July and August at 

507 Southern Building 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 

Single Copies 10 Cents 
______________ 

Editor 

REV. WALTER R. NOB 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 

RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 

MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 

Advertising rates furnished on application. 



Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to receive 
their papers, should promptly notify the Business Man- 
ager, giving when necessary, both the old and new ad- 
dress. 



THE ANNIVERSARY NUMBER 



On account of so much Convention material that 
must be used this month, we must wait until June 
for our Anniversary Number, but we are using this 
month the following letters from our readers, which 
should be of interest to all of the people of th© 
Diocese : 

400 Van Houten St., 
Patterson, N. J., 
May 4, 1936. 
Rev. Walter R. Noe, 
Editor of the Mission Herald, 
507 Southern Building, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

Dear Mr. Noe : 

My brother. Rev. Francis Joyner, of Littleton, 
N. C. sends me the Mission Herald — that all these 
nearly fifty years, I have had a very personal and 
living interest in the good work it has done and is 
doing for the Diocese. A request in the April num- 
ber attracted my attention. I think I am the only 
person who can give you the origin of the Mission 
Herald. 

My husband, Rev. Hardy H. Phelps, started a 
four page journal for his scattered country parish. 
I did the addressing for mailing and we called it 
The Mission Herald, and later when it was enlarged 
to an eifdrt page paper, he gave it that name. When 
in 1890 he accepted the work of Evangelist iin the 
Convocation of Edenton, Dr. N. C. Hughes the Dean, 
he used his paper in that work, and found it very 
useful. When in 1893 he accepted parish work, on 



leaving East Carolina he bequeathed the Mission 
Herald to the Diocese or perhaps to the Convocation 
but it was very soon the Diocesan paper with its 
name unchanged. I hope you will find this bit of 
history of interest in your Anniversary Number. 
We were both natives of Eastern North Carolina; 
and kept in touch with the work through the Church 
papers of the three dioceses, and your fine Bishops 
are known far and wide. I will anticipate your next 
number with great interest. 

With cordial wishes for the very best blessings 
on the Convention. I am, 

Sincerely. 

HARRIETTS JOYNER PHELPS 



Aurora, N. C, 
April 27, 1936. 
Dear Mr. Noe : 

It is a great pleasure to tell you I have been n 
subscriber to The Mission Herald all my married 
life, fifty yearsi ever since it was published, and I 
do not remember having missed a copy. 
With all my good wishes, 
Sincerely, 

MRS. CHARLIE S. WATSON 



WILL YOU HELP US TO PLACE THE MISSION 
HERALD IN EVERY HOME? 



As the Editor and Business Manager stated at 
the meeting of the Convention, a large number of 
the parishes and missions are helping us to place 
the Mission Herald in every home. It is the hope 
that the other parishes and missions will accept our 
special offer. It can be done by putting the small 
cost in either the parish budget or the budget of 
one of the parish organizations. To cover this cost 
enough subscriptions at the regular price of $1.00 
a year might easily be secured in any parish or 
mission. We believe that it will be one of the best 
investments that any parish or mission can make 
at this time. We arc told that the best way to 
awaken the conscience is to inform the mind. Reg- 
ular readers of The Mission Herald will be kept in 
toitch with the work of the Church at home and 
abroad. 



CONVENTION WILL MEET IN GOLDSBORO 
IN 1937 



The invitation of St. Stephen's. Goldsboro, for the 
Convention to meet there in 1937 was unanimously 
accepted. 



MAY, 1936 



9 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE STATE 
OF THE CHURCH 



According to the statistics for the year 1935, our 
Diocese has been able not only to hold its own but to 
make some progress. 

The parishes and missions report improvement in 
both their financial and spiritual life. 

The Bishop's report shows an increase of twenty 
in confirmations. 

The Treasurer reports that for the first time since 
]929 all budget requirements, including the full Gen- 
eral Church Quota, were met promptly. 

At the Convention last year, steps were taken to 
pay off the Diocesan debt of $23,000.00 over a per- 
iod of four years and to start an Endowment Fund 
for the support of the Episcopate. A Committee was 
appointed to solicit subscriptions from a selected list 
of individuals and preparation was made for the 
Epiphany offering. While the work of the Commit- 
tee has not been completed, there has been a generous 
response from many of our people. It seems now 
that the full amount for the first year will be raised 
by early fall. 

This report would be incomplete without some 
mention of the Forward Movement. A larger num- 
ber of our parishes and missions have used the litera- 
ture and cooperated in other ways with the National 
Commission. The President of the Woman's Aux- 
iliary has given much of her time to this work as a 
member of the National Commission and as Chair- 
man of the Woman's Department of the Commission. 

We do not feel that the Diocese, as a whole, has 
made full use of this movement and would recom- 
mend that the program presented to the clergy at 
their recent Conference be carried out in every 
parish and mission. 

As the years of our financial difficulties pass and 
brighter days greet us, let us not forget our partner- 
ship and give or share as Cod gives; freely, liberally, 
constantly. 

CHARLES E. WILLIAMS, Chairman. 
WALTER R. NOE 
J. LEON MALONE 
P. H. KASEY. 



A DIOCESAN LAYMEN'S LEAGUE 



The Com^ention approved a report of the Commit- 
tee on the Formation of a Diocesan Laymen's League, 
and provided by resolution for a meeting of laymen 
at Camp Leach for a discussion of the whole matter. 

In its report the Committee states that the first 
essential is that at least five parish leagues be formed 
as this number is necessarv for the formation of a 



Diocesan League and recommends that the parishes 
be requested to consider and act upon the formation 
of parish leagues. 



ELECTIONS AT THE CONVENTION 



Chancellor of the Diocese: Mr. George B. Elliott, 
Wilmington. 

Registrar and Treasurer: Rev. Walter R. Noe, 
Wilmington. 

Members of the Executive Council for three years : 
Rev. George S. Gresham, Goldsboro;.Rev. E. F. Mose- 
ley, Williamston; Mr. George C. Royall, Goldsboro ; 
Mr. George B. Elliott, Wilmington; Mrs. Fred L. 
Outland, Washington. 

Members of the Standing Committee: Rev. Ste- 
phen Gardner, Washington; Rev. A. C. D. Noe, Bath; 
Rev. C. A. Ashby, Edenton ; Mr. E. R. Conger, Eden- 
ton : Mi - . Harvey L. Myers, Washington. 

Trustees of the Diocese : Mr. J. V. Grainger, Wil- 
mington; Mr. T. F. Darden, Wilmington. 

Editor and Business Manager of the Mission Her- 
ald : Rev. Walter R. Noe, Wilmington. 



REPORT OF THE BISHOP'S MEMORIAL 
ANNIVERSARY FUND COMMITTEE 



After reports by Rev. W. H. Milton, D. D., Chair- 
man and Rev. J. B. Gibble, Secretary and Treasurer, 
showing that people generally have responded and 
that others will when seen, the following resolution 
was adopted by the Convention. 

Resolved, That the Convention approves the meth- 
od adopted by the last Convention of the Diocese for 
cancelling the debt of $23,000.00 and further author- 
izes the solicitation of $5,000.00 for the coming year 
ending at the next Convention from a selected list 
of subscribers within the Diocese and the continuance 
of an Annual Epiphany Offering until the whole debt 
is cancelled. 

The report of the Treasurer will be published in 
the June Issue of the Mission Herald. 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY ASKED TO MEET AT 
TIME OF THE CONVENTION 



By resolution of the Convention the members of the 
Woman's Auxiliary were asked to hold their annual 
meetings at the time of the meeting of the Annual 
Convention of the Diocese and in the same place. 
This request will have to be considered by the next 
annual meeting of the Woman's Auxiliary. 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD 



DISTRICT MEETINGS OF THE WOMAN'S 

AUXILIARY IN THE CONVOCATION 

OF EDENTON 



The Get-Together District Meetings in the Con- 
vocation of Edenton will be held in May and June 
this year in the following places : 

District No. 3 — Ayden, Farmville, Greenville, 
Grifton, Winterville, Mrs. G. S. Vought, president — 
Grifton, May 22. 

District No. 4 — Aurora, Bath, Bonnerton, Choco- 
winity. Edward, Washington, Zion, Mrs. Edgard 
Douglas, president — Zion, May 20. 

District No. 5 — Belhaven, Fairfield, Lake Landing, 
Sladesville. Swan Quarter, Yeatesville, Mrs. George 
Selby, president — Belhaven, June 10. 

District No. 6 — Columbia, Creswell, Lake Phelps, 
Plymouth, Roper, Miss Tda Peacock, president — Ply- 
mouth, May 21. 

District No. 7 — Camden. Edenton, Elizabeth City, 
Hertford, Nag's Head, Weeksville, Winfall ; Mrs. 
W. E. White, president— Elizabeth City— May 28. 

District No. 8 — Avoca, Bear Grass, Hamilton, Rob- 
ersonville, Roxobel, Williamston, Windsor, Wood- 
ville; Miss Effie Waldo, president- — Woodville, 
May 26. 

District No. 9 — Ahoskie, Gatesville, Murfreesboro, 
Sunbury, Winton ; Mrs. Maud Newsome, president— 
Sunbury, June 12. 

The meetings will begin with a Celebration of the 
Holy Communion at 10:00 A. M. At each of these 
meetings there will be group conferences for all 
auxiliary officers and chairmen. Each group will 
meet separately and will make a special study of 
the Woman's Auxiliary Annual Report and Diocesan 
Program. There will be a discussion period on the 
most effective way to carry on the work of the dif- 
ferent offices and in the departments. Any person 
who is not an officer or chairman will be invited 
to meet with any group she thinks will be most 
helpful. Programs will be mailed to 'the local Aux- 
iliaries by the District Presidents. All Auxiliary 
presidents in these districts are urged to see that 
every woman in each parish has a way to attend 
these meetings. 

MAY CAHOON CARAWAN, President 



MEETING OF ELEVENTH DISTRICT OF THE 
WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 



The fourth Get-Together meeting of the eleventh 
district of the Wilmington Convocation was held 
at Trinity Church, Lumberton. N. C. on Mav 6, 1936. 

The meeting was opened at 10:00 o'clock with a 
celebration of the Holy Communion, followed by a 
business sesson. Due to illness. Mrs. S. L. Smith, 



Chairman, could not attend, so Mrs. J. Q. Beckwith 
was acting Chairman. The meeting was opened 
with the singing of the hymn — "Go Forward Chris- 
tian Soldiers". 

Greetings from Lumberton parish were given by 
Mrs. J. C. Johnston. Response by Mrs. J. W. Tolar, 
Fayettville, N. C. 

Mesdames J. C. Pope, Thomas M. Wooten, Howard 
Alligood, of Fayetteville, were appointed as a Nomi- 
nating Committee to select a chairman for the Con- 
vocation. Mrs. W. N. Tillinghast and Mrs. John R. 
Tolar were named on the Courtesy Committee. 

Mrs. Beckwith gave a very inspiring address on 
Fellowship, pointing out that fellowship is the great- 
est asset of our Auxiliary work. That we must 
strengthen our fellowship in our homes, churches, 
and community which will greatly stimulate and 
strengthen us in our Master's service and that by 
indifference and selfishness we will break down 
His work. 

A report was given by the Auxiliaries of the'r 
various activities. Mrs. J. C. Pope of the Woman's 
Auxiliary of St. John's Fayetteville ; reported the 
clothing of an orphan at Thompson Orphanage at 
Charlotte, N. C, study classes during Lent, visiting 
the sick, services at Confederate Woman's Home. 

St. Mary's Chapter, Fayetteville. Mrs. C. B. Til- 
linghast reported eight new members this year, 
clothing of ten year old twins at Thompson Orphan- 
age, distribution of magazines and books to County 
Hospital, Jail, Mission Church, services at Confed- 
erate Woman's Home, furnishing milk for under- 
nourished school children and work at Community 
center. 

Lumberton reported that their number was very 
small, but they had had an educational program, 
altar guild work, and played Santa Claus to a fam- 
ily of nine. 

In an address given by Mrs. W. N. Till : nghast 
she mentioned the three activities our Church has 
had and is having: first, evangelism, which brought 
results: second, the chnrch-wide endeavor to arouso 
enthusiasm ; and another activity called the For- 
ward Movement to get the members to respond to 
the financial needs of the Church's work not only 
in this eountry bat all over the world. She also 
stressed the fact that we as Auxiliary women must 
try to influence women of the Church who are in- 
different to the work of the Church as there are 
only one-third of the women who are active. 

Miss Caroline Myers, of Wilmington, N. C, Cus- 
todian of the United Thank Offering, gave a talk 
on what the United Thank Offering means, and 
urg^d the women to use the "Little Blue Box" 
more. She stated that to date the 1936 U. T. O. 
was i^200.00 less than in 1935. but hoped more con- 



MAY, 1936 



11 



tributions would come in. Mrs. Beck with an- 
nounced that the Woman's Auxiliary is giving three 
prizes for the best poster on the United Thank 
Offering, ages from first year in high school or 
over. First; prize is $25.00; second prize, $15.00, 
and third prize, $10.00. Information may be se- 
cured from 281 Fourth Avenue, New York City. 

Rev. Walter Noe gave a short talk on the Forward 
Movement. He stated that we also needed a for- 
ward movement in the district to get more members. 
There are two counties' in this district without 
Episcopal Churches. . •" 

After the singing of a hymn, Bishop Darst gave 
the noon day prayer and a short address. He es- 
pecially stressed that ;the Church must arouse the 
youth and middle aged to a value of a Standard, 
that by influence we must change the attitude from 
wrong to right. 

Mrs. Adams, former President of the Wilmington 
Convocation, gave a short talk on what the Woman's 
Auxiliary is, and asked that we never lose sight 
of the fact that the parish is first a part of the 
National Church. 

Mrs. Beckwith urged all Auxiliaries to continue 
their meetings through the summer months, and 
to study the requirements for getting on the honor 
roll and to send in reports not later than June 15. 
She also stated that she had no information on the 
summer work but would send it out by the 1st 
of June. 

Reverend James Beckwith talked on Camp Leach, 
telling how the activities at the camp fi'tted every 
part of life. He also urged that every boy and 
girl possible be sent. 

The meeting adjourned for lunch and a social 
hour, at the home of Mrs. Beckwith, which was a 
delightful affair. 

At 2 :00 P. M. the Conference assembled for its 
afternoon session in Trinity Church. After the 
singing of the opening hymn, "Co, Labor On", 
B ; llie Tillinghast, of the Senior League of St. John's, 
Fayetteville, spoke on Camp Leach, giving the dates 
of the various camps to be held during the summer, 
the programs, and leaders. 

The Nominating Committee reported that Mrs. 
Stephen O. Worth, of Fayetteville, was selected 
as chairman of the 11th district. 

Mrs. W. N. Tillinghast, chairman of the Courtesy 
Committee, expressed to the members of Trinity 
Church, Lumbertoni. appreciation for the delightful 
dinner and wholesome hospitality enjoyed by all. 

The offering amounted to $5.00. 

After the singing of a hymn. Bishop Thomas C. 
Darst closed the meeting with the benediction. 

MRS. STEPHEN C. W T ORTH, Secretary. 



OUR MISSIONARIES 



We send our love to our missionaries across the 
wide waters. They are the servants of the Church 
and bond servants of Christ. They have left home 
and friends and native land and followed the gleam 
in a supreme adventure of the spirit. They are 
soldiers in the militant army of the Great Captain, 
who commanded them to go into all the world and 
preach and teach in His name. He promised to go 
with them, for He called them to no easy task. And 
His presence is absolutely necessary to their success. 
But upon us rests a threefold responsibility — the 
responsibility of intercession, of passionate interest, 
and of providing the means whereby our gallant 
and dedicated missionaries can carry on in the name 
of Him who took upon Himself the form of a servant 
and became obedient unto death, even the death 
of the cross. — Southern Christian Advocate. 



ST. ANDREW'S-BY-THE SEA, NAG'S HEAD 



To Friends of the Church — 

Especially friends of the Nag's Head Church, 
St. Andrew 's-by J the-Sea. 

The location of this Church building was care- 
fully chosen on a good, high, sandy place, midway 
between the Sound and the Ocean. Gradually and 
unexpectedly the storms of wind and rain changed 
the face of nature and reduced the good dry site 
to a bad, wet, mosquito-infested depression, repel- 
lent to many and inaccessible to some who would 
go to the Church. 

It was unanimously determined that the building 
must be abandoned or removed. The Trustees of 
the Diocese of East Carolina approved. The Com- 
mittee appointed to carry out the removal made 
contract with L. B. Perry, Building Contractor, for 
the removal and the satisfactory adjustment of 
everything, including laying of concrete pavement 
from the highway to the Church. 

To avoid delays, the Committee in charge arranged 
financially and now asks all who will, to contribute 
for the payment of this obligation. The Rev. George 
F. Hill, Elizabeth City, is Treasurer. Rev. Messrs. 
Frederick B. Drane and Robert B. Drane are the 
other members in charge. 

The removal is expected to be done now any day, 
and paid for. 



At the pre-Convention meeting, held on Tuesday 
evening. May 12th, addresses were made by Mr. 
George B. Elliott, Wilmington, Mr. Billy Daniels, 
Wilmington, and Mr. Frederick A. Turner, Theo- 
logical Seminary, in Virginia. 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD 



PENTECOST 

HOME 

■ 

"And when the day of Pentecost was fully come, 
they were all with one accord in one place 

And suddenly there came a sound from heaven as 
of a rushing mighty wind, and filled all the house 
where they were sitting." Acts 2 :l-2. 

Where did the Spirit come from? The Spirit 
came upon the group while they were in an Upper 
Room, a home. The home, according to tradition, 
was that of Mary, the mother of John Mark. Trie 
significance lies in the fact that the Spirit came 
upon them, not when they were in the Temple or 
in any specially sacred place, but in a home. 

Religion then is to center not in a temple, but in 
the home. The gift of the Spirit is not to be asso- 
ciated particularly with sermons and services, but 
with power to live radiantly every day in every 
way, and to make our bodies the temples of the 
Spirit and our homes the home of God. The home 
is the hope of our race. Unless religion can be at 
home, in the home, no amount of religion in the 
temple can save us. Christ was born in a manger, 
the Church was born in a home. 

The Spirit came, not upon the twelve alone, but 
upon the whole body of the followers of Christ. 
Of the five hundred who saw Jesus after his resur- 
rection only one hundred and twenty were at Pen- 
tecost, so that three hundred and eighty believers 
did not elect to receive God's highest gift. The 
coming of the Spirit was not for the purposes of 
the twelve alone. Had the Spirit been given to 
the twelve alone, there would have been built up 
in Christianity a spiritual hierarchy that would 
have killed the essential spirit. 

At Pentecost the highest gift was open to a per- 
son as a person, and Peter and James and John 
stood in a position not one whit different from the 
humblest of seekers and believers. At Pentecost 
the one hundred and twenty were there with the 
women. Mary the mother of Jesus was also there. 
Mary, and Peter and John received the Spirit along- 
side of the others, and in that decisive noment all 
superiorities were cancelled or lost sight of. At 
Pentecost all life is gathered into a common center, 
Christ, and then it goes out from that common cen- 
ter to tell, each in its own language, the wonderful 
works of Cod. 

LILA M. ADAMS 



Come as the Dew and refresh, 
Correct, Convert and Consecrate 
Many hearts and lives to our great 

and Thy greater glory, 
And this we ask for Jesus Christ's sake." Amen. 



FIFTH SUNDAY RURAL WORK CONFERENCE 
AT BATH 



The Diocesan Rural Work Committee will sponsor 
a Rural Workers' Conference in St. Thomas' Church, 
Bath, N. C, on Sunday, May 31st, 1936. The Mis- 
sionary Clergy and at least one representative from 
each of their parishes and missions are urged to at- 
tend. All other interested persons are cordially in- 
vited. 

The congregation of St. Thomas' Church, Bath, 
will serve lunch to all who attend. Those planning 
to attend should write the Rev. A. C. D. Noe, Bath, 
N. O, so that he may know how many to expect for 
lunch. I would suggest that you either be sure to 
write Mr. Noe or take your own lunch, as it would 
not be quite fair to our friends in Bath to do other- 
wise. 

The subject for discussion at this conference will 
be "Rural Church Administration", as suggested by 
our last Conference. Four of the leading Laymen 
in the diocese have been asked to make ten minute 
addresses on different phases of this subject. There 
will be a five minute period for open discussion fol- 
lowing each of the addresses. 

The Program 

1. Morning Prayer, (Clergy vested), and sermon 
by the Rev. A. J. Mackiei, 11 A. M. 

2. Luncheon. 

3. Afternoon Session, beginning at 2:00 P. M. 

a. Does our Diocesan Missionary Work need 
closer supervision ? — By Mr. H. E. Rodgers, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

b. A standard Salary Scale for the Mission- 
ary Clergy.— By Mr. John R. Tolar, Fay- 
etteville, N. C. 

c. Where We Should Concentrate on our 
Missionary Work, and Why. — By Mr. J. 
Q. Beckwith. Lumberton, N. C. 

d. Tested Methods in Rural Work.— By Mr. 
Oscar Hardy, Seven Springs, N. C. 



MEMBERS OF THE CONVENTION COME TO AID 
OF THE THOMPSON ORPHANAGE 



"Oh Cod. the Holy Chost, 
Come to us, and among us, 
Come as the Fire and burn, 



After a statement by the Rev. W. H. Wheeler, Su- 
perintendent of the Thompson Orphanage, that ad- 
ditional funds were needed for this year. East Caro- 
lina 's part of the whole, amounting to about $400.00. 
was piven or pledged by members of the Convent'on. 



MAY, 1936 



13 



LAKE KANUGA CONFERENCES 



Several new features have been added to the 
summer schedule at Kanuga Lake, conference cen- 
ter of the Episcopal Church, near Hendersonville, 
which will be initiated with a Retreat for. Women 
beginning on June 9th. A Midgets' camp for girls 
has been added, to be held simultaneously with the 
period of the Adult Conference. July 11th to 25th. 
This camp will be open 'to girls between the ages 
of 10 and 12 years and will be held at the boys' 
camp, situated a quarter of a mile from the Inn 
and Lake. Miss Alice Boney, Columbia, will be in 
charge of the girls, with Mrs. Shubad Beasley, 
Memphis, Tenn. directing the classes in Bible stor- 
ies, symbols, and other subjects interesting to girls 
of that age. 

A conference for college age has also been made 
a feature of the adult conference, to fill the need 
felt by young members of the staff and conference 
for classes of their own. No one except college 
age students, or those planning to enter college 
next year will be permitted to join these classes 
which will be under the leadership of the Rt. Rev. 
Thos. C. Darst, D. D. Bishop of East Carolina, on 
"The Meanimr and Purpose of the Christian Life", 
and the Rev. T. O. Wedel. Ph. D. Secretary of 
College Work for the National Council, who will 
conduct a course on "What is Christianity?" "Youth 
at the Cross Roads", will be the subject of a class 
for one week led by Mrs. James W. Griffith, worker 
from the Diocese of Georgia, and "Spiritual Prepa- 
ration for Marriage" during the second week, led 
by the Rt. Rev. R. E. Gribbin. D. D., Bishop of 
Western North Carolina. Miss Louise Starr, student 
worker at the University of Georgia will conduct a 
course also on "Church Work Among Students." 

Outstanding among members of the faculty for 
the Adult Conference will be: the Rev. Arthur M. 
Sherman, S. T. D., Associate Secretary for